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Posts Tagged ‘power’

Info On Intel Bay Trail 22nm Atom Platform Shows Out-of-Order Design

January 5th, 2013 01:16 admin View Comments

Intel

MojoKid writes “New leaked info from Intel sheds light on how the company’s 2014 platforms will challenge ARM products in the ultra light, low power market. At present, the company’s efforts in the segment are anchored by Cedar Trail, the 32nm dual-core platform that launched a year ago. To date, all of Intel’s platform updates for Atom have focused on lowering power consumption and ramping SoC integration rather than focusing on performance — but Bay Trail will change that. Bay Trail moves Atom to a quad-core, 22nm, out-of-order design. It significantly accelerates the CPU core with burst modes of up to 2.7GHz, and it’ll be the first Atom to feature Intel’s own graphics processor instead of a licensed core from Imagination Technologies.”

Source: Info On Intel Bay Trail 22nm Atom Platform Shows Out-of-Order Design

Intel To Debut Limited-Run Ivy Bridge Processor

January 3rd, 2013 01:11 admin View Comments

Intel

abhatt writes “Intel is set to debut the most power efficient chip in the world — a limited edition ‘Ivy Bridge’ processor in the upcoming annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. Only a select group of tablet and ultrabook vendors will receive the limited Ivy Bridge chips. From the article: ‘Intel did not say how far below 10 watts these special “Y” series Ivy Bridge processors will go, though Intel vice president Kirk Skaugen is expected to talk about the processors at CES. These Ivy Bridge chips were first mentioned at Intel’s annual developer conference last year but it wasn’t clear at that time if Intel and its partners would go forward with designs. But it appears that some PC vendors will have select models in the coming months, according to Intel.’”

Source: Intel To Debut Limited-Run Ivy Bridge Processor

Cree Introduces 200 Lumen/Watt Production Power LEDs

December 29th, 2012 12:48 admin View Comments

News

ndverdo writes “Cree just announced production power LEDs reaching 200 lumen/watt. Approximately doubling the previous peak LED light efficiency, the new LEDs will require less cooling. This should enable the MK-R series to finally provide direct no-hassle replacements to popular form-factors such as MR-16 spots and incandescent lighting in general. The LEDs are sampling and it is stated that ‘production quantities are available with standard lead times.’”

Source: Cree Introduces 200 Lumen/Watt Production Power LEDs

Intel Challenges ARM On Power Consumption… And Ties

December 24th, 2012 12:55 admin View Comments

Intel

GhostX9 writes “Tom’s Hardware just published a detailed look at the Intel Atom Z2760 in the Acer Iconia W510 and compared it to the NVIDIA Tegra 3 in the Microsoft Surface. They break it down and demonstrate how the full Windows 8 tablet outperforms the Windows RT machine in power consumption. They break down power consumption to include the role of the CPU, GPU, memory controller and display. Anandtech is also reporting similar findings, but only reports CPU and GPU utilization.” Despite repeated claims that x86 is beating ARM here, they look neck in neck. Assuming you can make a meaningful comparison.

Source: Intel Challenges ARM On Power Consumption… And Ties

Book Review: Burdens of Proof

December 24th, 2012 12:11 admin View Comments

Books

benrothke writes “When the IBM PC first came out 31 years ago, it supported a maximum of 256KB RAM. You can buy an equivalent computer today with substantially more CPU power at a fraction of the price. But in those 31 years, the information security functionality in which the PC operates has not progressed accordingly. In Burdens of Proof: Cryptographic Culture and Evidence Law in the Age of Electronic Documents, author Jean-François Blanchette observes that the move to a paperless society means that paper-based evidence needs to be recreated in the digital world. It also requires an underlying security functionality to flow seamlessly across organizations, government agencies and the like. While the computing power is there, the ability to create a seamless cryptographic culture is much slower in coming.” Keep reading for the rest of Ben’s review.

Burdens of Proof: Cryptographic Culture and Evidence Law in the Age of Electronic Documents
author Jean-François Blanchette
pages 288
publisher MIT Press
rating 9/10
reviewer Ben Rothke
ISBN 978-0262017510
summary Excellent overview and history of using cryptography to build a trust framework

Source: Book Review: Burdens of Proof

First Radeon HD 8000M GPU Benchmarked

December 21st, 2012 12:39 admin View Comments

AMD

J. Dzhugashvili writes “As Slashdot noted earlier this week, AMD has a new line of mid-range Radeon GPUs aimed at notebooks. The chips are based on the Graphics Core Next microarchitecture, and they’re slated to show up in systems early next year. While the initial report was limited to specification details, the first review of the Radeon HD 8790M is now out, complete with benchmark data from the latest games. The 8790M is about 35% smaller than its 7690M predecessor but offers substantially better gaming performance across the board. Impressively, the new chip has similar power draw as the outgoing model under load, and its idle power consumption is slightly lower. Notebook makers should have no problems making the switch. However, it is worth noting that this new mobile GPU exhibits some of the same frame latency spikes observed on desktop Radeons, including in games that AMD itself has sponsored.”

Source: First Radeon HD 8000M GPU Benchmarked

Is Safe, Green Thorium Power Finally Ready For Prime Time?

December 19th, 2012 12:38 admin View Comments

Power

MrSeb writes “If you’ve not been tracking the thorium hype, you might be interested to learn that the benefits liquid fluoride thorium reactors (LFTRs) have over light water uranium reactors (LWRs) are compelling. Alvin Weinberg, who invented both, favored the LFTR for civilian power since its failures (when they happened) were considerably less dramatic — a catastrophic depressurization of radioactive steam, like occurred at Chernobyl in 1986, simply wouldn’t be possible. Since the technical hurdles to building LFTRs and handling their byproducts are in theory no more challenging, one might ask — where are they? It turns out that a bunch of U.S. startups are investigating the modern-day viability of thorium power, and countries like India and China have serious, governmental efforts to use LFTRs. Is thorium power finally ready for prime time?”

Source: Is Safe, Green Thorium Power Finally Ready For Prime Time?

Perl Turns 25

December 18th, 2012 12:25 admin View Comments

Perl

Several readers sent word that the Perl programming language turned 25 today. In his commemorative post at the Perl Foundation’s website, mdk wrote, “So what does the future hold for Perl? Well I don’t have a crystal ball but I cannot see the language fading from usage in the next quarter century, the truth of the matter is that even though there are languages that can do some of the things that Perl does, some of them do some things better, others do things Perl wasn’t designed for, there is no language that has been designed to do the things that Perl is very good at doing. No language in the current scripting languages seems to have the flexibility, maturity and extensibility of Perl. The main power of Perl has always been its ability to quickly adapt, and be adapted, to suit purposes. … The greatest challenges we will face for Perl is a shifting end-user base that will become more reliant on devices that are feature focused but crippled in application choice, the rise in mobile devices will continue and Perl will need to evolve to work with that. A better challenge for us to face would be the integration with electronically aware, and connected devices and systems, the apocryphal internet of things, in this Perl could be a powerful tool. I also believe that the more we see a divergence of language uses in the other scripting languages the more they will face issues in their core designs, issues that Perl avoids due to its malleable nature, what some believe is the crippling factor for Perl is likely to be its saving grace as it has the power and flexibility to cope with the shifting goalposts of an increasingly technologically reliant world.”

Source: Perl Turns 25

Will Japan’s New Government Restart the Nuclear Power Program?

December 17th, 2012 12:08 admin View Comments

Japan

An anonymous reader writes in with a story about speculation that Japan might restart its nuclear power program. “Japan’s newly-elected Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), a strong supporter of atomic energy use in the past, should restart plants shut after the world’s worst nuclear crisis in 25 years, said the CEO of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd . The LDP, headed by Japan’s next prime minister Shinzo Abe, won a landslide victory on Sunday, fueling speculation that the new coalition government would take a softer stance on nuclear power. Public opinion remains divided on the role of atomic energy after natural disasters last year triggered a radiation crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi plant.”

Source: Will Japan’s New Government Restart the Nuclear Power Program?

Solar Panels For Every Home?

December 14th, 2012 12:10 admin View Comments

Power

Hugh Pickens writes “David Crane and Robert F.Kennedy Jr. write in the NY Times that with residents of New Jersey and New York living through three major storms in the past 16 months and suffering sustained blackouts, we need to ask whether it is really sensible to power the 21st century by using an antiquated and vulnerable system of copper wires and wooden poles. Some have taken matters into their own hands, purchasing portable gas-powered generators to give themselves varying degrees of grid independence. But these dirty, noisy and expensive devices have no value outside of a power failure and there is a better way to secure grid independence for our homes and businesses: electricity-producing photovoltaic panels installed on houses, warehouses and over parking lots, wired so that they deliver power when the grid fails. ‘Solar panels have dropped in price by 80 percent in the past five years and can provide electricity at a cost that is at or below the current retail cost of grid power in 20 states, including many of the Northeast states,’ write Crane and Kennedy. ‘So why isn’t there more of a push for this clean, affordable, safe and inexhaustible source of electricity?’ First, the investor-owned utilities that depend on the existing system for their profits have little economic interest in promoting a technology that empowers customers to generate their own power. Second, state regulatory agencies and local governments impose burdensome permitting and siting requirements that unnecessarily raise installation costs. While it can take as little as eight days to license and install a solar system on a house in Germany, in the United States, depending on your state, the average ranges from 120 to 180 days.”

Source: Solar Panels For Every Home?