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Posts Tagged ‘Internet’

IE Flaw Lets Sites Track Your Mouse Cursor, Even When You Aren’t Browsing

December 12th, 2012 12:42 admin View Comments

Internet Explorer

An anonymous reader writes “A new Internet Explorer vulnerability has been discovered that allows an attacker to track your mouse cursor anywhere on the screen, even if the browser isn’t being actively used. ‘Whilst the Microsoft Security Research Center has acknowledged the vulnerability in Internet Explorer, they have also stated that there are no immediate plans to patch this vulnerability in existing versions of the browser. It is important for users of Internet Explorer to be made aware of this vulnerability and its implications. The vulnerability is already being exploited by at least two display ad analytics companies across billions of page impressions per month.’ All supported versions of Microsoft’s browser are reportedly affected: IE6, IE7, IE8, IE9, and IE10.”

Source: IE Flaw Lets Sites Track Your Mouse Cursor, Even When You Aren’t Browsing

Russia and China Withdraw Bid For Internet Control

December 10th, 2012 12:50 admin View Comments

China

judgecorp writes “Russia, China and other nations have withdrawn proposals to take control over the Internet within their borders. The proposals, handed to the World Conference on International Telecommunications (WCIT) on Friday, caused widespread dismay and protest. The WCIT event in Dubai, run by the UN agency ITU, is working on new International Telecommunications Regulations (ITRs) which are due for their first revision since the emergence of the mass Internet. The line-up of nations wanting to formalize their power to restrict the Internet included Russia, China, UAE, Saudi Arabia, Algeria, Sudan and Egypt. Their proposal has been withdrawn without explanation, an ITU spokesperson confirmed.”

Source: Russia and China Withdraw Bid For Internet Control

Russia, China, and Others Seek Greater Control Over Internet

December 9th, 2012 12:23 admin View Comments

The Internet

kodiaktau writes “A proposal put forth by Russia, China, Saudi Arabia, Algeria, Sudan and the United Arab Emirates seeks greater international control and government of internet addressing. ‘A leaked draft (PDF) of the Russia-led proposals would give countries “equal rights to manage the Internet including in regard to the allotment, assignment and reclamation of Internet numbering.” This could allow governments to render websites within their borders inaccessible, even via proxy servers or other countries. It also could allow for multinational pacts in which countries could terminate access to websites at each others’ request.’ The move would basically undermine ICANN and decentralize control of internet addressing: ‘The revision would give nations the explicit right to “implement policy” on net governance and “regulate the national Internet segment,” the draft says.’”

Source: Russia, China, and Others Seek Greater Control Over Internet

Nationwide Google Fiber Deployment Would Cost $140 Billion

December 8th, 2012 12:41 admin View Comments

Businesses

An anonymous reader writes “For a lot of U.S. internet users, Google Fiber sounds too good to be true — 1Gbps speeds for prices similar to much slower plans from current providers. Google is testing the service now in Kansas City, but what would it take for them to roll it out to the rest of the country? Well, according to a new report from Goldman Sachs, the price tag would be over $140 billion. Not even Google has that kind of cash laying around. From the report: ‘… if Google devoted 25% of its $4.5bn annual capex to this project, it could equip 830K homes per year, or 0.7% of US households. As such, even a 50mn household build out, which would represent less than half of all U.S. homes, could cost as much as $70bn. We note that Jason Armstrong estimates Verizon has spent roughly $15bn to date building out its FiOS fiber network covering an area of approximately 17mn homes.’ Meanwhile, ISPs like Time Warner aren’t sure the demand exists for 1Gbps internet, so it’s unlikely they’ll leap to invest in their own build-out.”

Source: Nationwide Google Fiber Deployment Would Cost $140 Billion

US House Votes 397-0 To Oppose UN Control of the Internet

December 5th, 2012 12:32 admin View Comments

The Internet

An anonymous reader writes “The U.S. House of Representatives voted 397-0 today on a resolution to oppose U.N. control of the internet. ‘The 397-0 vote is meant to send a signal to countries meeting at a U.N. conference on telecommunications this week. Participants are meeting to update an international telecom treaty, but critics warn that many countries’ proposals could allow U.N. regulation of the Internet.’ The European Parliament passed a similar resolution a couple weeks ago, and the U.N. telecom chief has gone on record saying that freedom on the internet won’t be curbed. However, that wasn’t enough for U.S. lawmakers, who were quite proud of themselves for actually getting bipartisan support for the resolution (PDF). Rep Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) said, ‘We need to send a strong message to the world that the Internet has thrived under a decentralized, bottom-up, multi-stakeholder governance model.’”

Source: US House Votes 397-0 To Oppose UN Control of the Internet

Report Warns That Censorship Will Not Stop Terrorism

December 5th, 2012 12:10 admin View Comments

Censorship

concealment writes “The report evaluates the challenge of curbing online radicalization from the perspective of supply and demand. It concludes that efforts to shut down websites that could serve as incubators for would-be terrorists — going after the supply — will ultimately be self-defeating, and that ‘filtering of Internet content is impractical in a free and open society.’ ‘Approaches aimed at restricting freedom of speech and removing content from the Internet are not only the least desirable strategies, they are also the least effective,’ writes Peter Neumann, founding director of the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation at King’s College London and the author of the report.”

Source: Report Warns That Censorship Will Not Stop Terrorism

ITU Approves Deep Packet Inspection

December 4th, 2012 12:19 admin View Comments

Privacy

dsinc sends this quote from Techdirt about the International Telecommunications Union’s ongoing conference in Dubai that will have an effect on the internet everywhere: “One of the concerns is that decisions taken there may make the Internet less a medium that can be used to enhance personal freedom than a tool for state surveillance and oppression. The new Y.2770 standard is entitled ‘Requirements for deep packet inspection in Next Generation Networks’, and seeks to define an international standard for deep packet inspection (DPI). As the Center for Democracy & Technology points out, it is thoroughgoing in its desire to specify technologies that can be used to spy on people. One of the big issues surrounding WCIT and the ITU has been the lack of transparency — or even understanding what real transparency might be. So it will comes as no surprise that the new DPI standard was negotiated behind closed doors, with no drafts being made available.”

Source: ITU Approves Deep Packet Inspection

Internet Freedom Won’t Be Controlled, Says UN Telcom Chief

December 3rd, 2012 12:45 admin View Comments

Censorship

wiredmikey writes “The head of the UN telecommunications body, Hamadoun Toure, told an audience at the World Conference on International Telecommunications (WCIT-12) in Dubai on Monday that Internet freedom will not be curbed or controlled. ‘Nothing can stop the freedom of expression in the world today, and nothing in this conference will be about it,’ he said. Such claims are ‘completely (unfounded),’ Toure, secretary general of the International Telecommunication Union, told AFP. ‘We must continue to work together and find a consensus on how to most effectively keep cyberspace open, accessible, affordable and secure,’ UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon said. Google has been vocal in warning of serious repercussions, saying that ‘Some proposals could permit governments to censor legitimate speech — or even cut off Internet access,’ noted Google’s Vint Cerf in a blog post.”

Source: Internet Freedom Won’t Be Controlled, Says UN Telcom Chief

The Countries Most Vulnerable To an Internet Shutdown

December 3rd, 2012 12:30 admin View Comments

Censorship

Sparrowvsrevolution writes “In the wake of Syria’s 52-hour digital blackout last week, the networking firm Renesys performed an analysis of which countries are most susceptible to an Internet shutdown, based simply on how many distinct entities control the connections between the country’s networks and those of the outside world. It found that for 61 countries and territories, just one or two Internet service providers maintain all external connections–a situation that could make possible a quick cutoff from the world with a well-placed government order or physical attack.”

Source: The Countries Most Vulnerable To an Internet Shutdown

Interviews: Ask What You Will of Eugene Kaspersky

December 3rd, 2012 12:21 admin View Comments

Security

Eugene Kaspersky probably hates malware just as much as you do on his own machines, but as the head of Kaspersky Labs, the world’s largest privately held security software company, he might have a different perspective — the existence of malware and other forms of online malice drives the need for security software of all kinds, and not just on personal desktops or typical internet servers. The SCADA software vulnerabilities of the last few years have led him to announce work on an operating system for industrial control systems of the kind affected by Flame and Stuxnet. But Kaspersky is not just toiling away in the computer equivalent of the CDC: He’s been outspoken in his opinions — some of which have drawn ire on Slashdot, like calling for mandatory “Internet ID” and an “Internet Interpol”. He’s also come out in favor of Internet voting, and against SOPA, even pulling his company out of the BSA over it. More recently, he’s been criticized for ties to the current Russian government. (With regard to that Wired article, though, read Kaspersky’s detailed response to its claims.) Now, he’s agreed to answer Slashdot readers’ questions. As usual, you’re encouraged to ask all the question you’d like, but please confine your questions to one per post. We’ll pass on the best of these for Kaspersky’s answers.

Source: Interviews: Ask What You Will of Eugene Kaspersky