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Posts Tagged ‘CPUs’

CPUs Do Affect Gaming Performance, After All

August 23rd, 2012 08:55 admin View Comments

Graphics

crookedvulture writes “For years, PC hardware sites have maintained that CPUs have little impact on gaming performance; all you need is a decent graphics card. That position is largely supported by FPS averages, but the FPS metric doesn’t tell the whole story. Examining individual frame latencies better exposes the brief moments of stuttering that can disrupt otherwise smooth gameplay. Those methods have now been used to quantify the gaming performance of 18 CPUs spanning three generations. The results illustrate a clear advantage for Intel, whose CPUs enjoy lower frame latencies than comparable offerings from AMD. While the newer Intel processors perform better than their predecessors, the opposite tends to be true for the latest AMD chips. Turns out AMD’s Phenom II X4 980, which is over a year old, offers lower frame latencies than the most recent FX processors.”

Source: CPUs Do Affect Gaming Performance, After All

Flash Memory, Not Networks, Hamper Smartphones Most

February 18th, 2012 02:45 admin View Comments

Cellphones

Lucas123 writes “New research shows that far more than wireless network or CPUs, the NAND flash memory in cell phones, and in particular smartphones, affects the device’s performance when it comes to loading apps, surfing the web and loading and reading documents. In tests with top-selling 16GB smartphones, NAND flash memory slowed mobile app performance from two to three times with one exception, Kingston’s embedded memory card; that card slowed app performance 20X. At the bottom of the bottleneck is the fact that while network and CPUs speeds have kept pace with mobile app development, flash throughput hasn’t. The researchers from Georgia Tech and NEC Corp. are working on methods to improve flash performance (PDF), including using a PRAM buffer to stage writes or be used as the final location for the SQLite databases.”

Source: Flash Memory, Not Networks, Hamper Smartphones Most

WPA/WPA2 Cracking With CPUs, GPUs, and the Cloud

August 15th, 2011 08:33 admin View Comments

Security

wintertargeter writes “Yeah, it’s another article on security, but this time we finally get a complete picture. Tom’s Hardware looks at WPA/WPA2 brute-force cracking with CPUs, GPUs, and Amazon’s Nvidia Tesla-based EC2 cloud servers. Verdict? WPA/WPA2 is pretty damn secure. Now to wait for a side-channel attack. Sigh….”

Source: WPA/WPA2 Cracking With CPUs, GPUs, and the Cloud

Bitcoin Mining Tests On 16 NVIDIA and AMD GPUs

July 13th, 2011 07:00 admin View Comments

Bitcoin

Vigile writes “For users that have known about the process of bitcoin mining the obvious tool for the job has been the GPU. Miners have been buying up graphics cards during sales across the web but which GPUs offer the most dollar efficient, power efficient and quickest payoff for the bitcoin currency? A series of tests over at PC Perspective goes through 16 different GPU configurations including older high-end cards through modern low-cost options and even a $1700+ collection with multiple dual-GPU cards installed. The article gives details on how the mining programs work, why GPUs are faster than CPUs inherently and why AMD seems to be so much faster than NVIDIA.”

Source: Bitcoin Mining Tests On 16 NVIDIA and AMD GPUs

Hard Drive Overclocking Competition From Secau

June 30th, 2011 06:42 admin View Comments

Data Storage

Blittzed writes “We were reminiscing about the good old days of overclocking CPUs and memory, and the subject of hard drive overcloking came up. The discussion / argument we were having in the research lab ended up in a bet which now has to be settled. So, we are putting our money where our mouth is, and putting up $10,000 to anyone who can read a 500GB drive in under an hour. We will also consider other attempts with a smaller amount of money in the event that the one hour is not possible. There are a few rules (e.g. the drive still needs to work afterwards), but otherwise nothing is ruled out. Specific details can be found on the URL. Go let the white smoke out!”

Source: Hard Drive Overclocking Competition From Secau

AMD’s Fusion APU Pitted Against 21 Desktop CPUs

February 25th, 2011 02:38 admin View Comments

AMD

crookedvulture writes “When AMD unveiled the Bobcat CPU architecture behind its first Fusion APUs, the company claimed its Atom-killer would achieve 90% of the performance of mainstream desktop processors. But does it? This article compares the AMD E-350′s performance to more than 20 desktop CPUs between $87 and $999 to find out, and the results aren’t particularly encouraging. Although Fusion offers much better integrated graphics than Intel’s latest Atom, neither stands much chance of keeping up with even low-end desktop CPUs. The E-350 does offer very low power consumption and impressive platform integration, making it a good choice for home-theater PCs and mobile systems. Desktop users are better off waiting for Llano, a Fusion iteration due out this spring.”

Source: AMD’s Fusion APU Pitted Against 21 Desktop CPUs

Sandy Bridge Motherboards Dissected, Compared

January 7th, 2011 01:07 admin View Comments

crookedvulture writes As we’ve learned, Intel’s Sandy Bridge CPUs are pretty impressive. If you’re going to build yourself a system with one, you’ll need a new motherboard with an 1155-pin socket. The Tech Report has an in-depth look at four such boards based on Intel’s P67 Express chipset. Although the boards offer identical application performance, there are notable differences between their power consumption and the speed of onboard peripherals like USB 3.0 and Serial ATA ports. Some implement the new UEFI BIOS framework while others do not, and the quality of those implementations varies quite a bit. Recommended reading for anyone thinking about rolling their own desktop with one of Intel’s latest CPUs.”

Source: Sandy Bridge Motherboards Dissected, Compared

AMD Releases Three New Low-Cost CPUs

December 7th, 2010 12:25 admin View Comments

WesternActor writes “With its new Fusion APUs coming out in about a month, you wouldn’t think AMD would still be tweaking its processor lineup. But it released three new processors today—the Phenom II X6 1100T Black Edition, the Phenom II X2 565 Black Edition, and the Athlon II X3 455—to balance out its price-performance offerings. The Black Edition CPUs with their unlocked multipliers are probably the most interesting, particularly the Phenom II X6 1100T Black Edition which has six cores, runs at 3.3 GHz, and costs only $265. As the name implies, the 1100T represents only a minute increase in clock speed over the 1090T. It even has the same amount of L2 and L3 cache (3MB and 6MB, respectively), is based on the same 45nm production process, and is designed for the currently standard AM3 socket. Given that 1090T got the downward nudge in price to $235, however, the 1100T offers slightly better performance for less money.”

Source: AMD Releases Three New Low-Cost CPUs

Extreme Memory Oversubscription For VMs

August 10th, 2010 08:03 admin View Comments

Laxitive writes “Virtualization systems currently have a pretty easy time oversubscribing CPUs (running lots of VMs on a few CPUs), but have had a very hard time oversubscribing memory. GridCentric, a virtualization startup, just posted on their blog a video demoing the creation of 16 one-gigabyte desktop VMs (running X) on a computer with just 5 gigs of RAM. The blog post includes a good explanation of how this is accomplished, along with a description of how it’s different from the major approaches being used today (memory ballooning, VMWare’s page sharing, etc.). Their method is based on a combination of lightweight VM cloning (sort of like fork() for VMs) and on-demand paging. Seems like the ‘other half’ of resource oversubscription for VMs might finally be here.”

Source: Extreme Memory Oversubscription For VMs

SeaMicro Unveils 512 Atom-Based Server

June 14th, 2010 06:00 admin View Comments

1sockchuck writes “Stealthy startup SeaMicro has unveiled its new low-power server, which incorporates 512 Intel Atom CPUs, a load balancer and interconnection fabric into a 10u server. SeaMicro, which received a $9.3 million government grant from DOE to develop its technology, says its server uses less than 2 kilowatts of energy — suggesting that a single rack with four SeaMicro units and 2,048 CPUs could draw just 8 kilowatts of power. Check out the technical overview, plus additional coverage from Wired, GigaOm and VentureBeat.”

Source: SeaMicro Unveils 512 Atom-Based Server