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Posts Tagged ‘average’

2012 Set Record For Most Expensive Gas In US

January 1st, 2013 01:50 admin View Comments

Transportation

An anonymous reader writes “According to data from the American Automobile Association, the average price for a gallon of gas in the U.S. was higher in 2012 than in any year before it. Nationwide, gas averaged $3.60/gallon, up from $3.51/gallon in 2011. ‘The states with the most expensive annual averages for 2012 included Hawaii ($4.31), Alaska ($4.09), California ($4.03), New York ($3.90) and Connecticut ($3.90). The states with the least-expensive annual averages included South Carolina ($3.35), Missouri ($3.38), Mississippi ($3.39), Tennessee ($3.40) and Oklahoma ($3.41). The highest daily statewide average of the year was $4.67 in Calif. on Oct. 9, while the lowest daily statewide average was $2.91 a gallon in South Carolina on July 3.’ Bloomberg reports that fuel consumption is down 3.6% compared to last year, while U.S. oil production reached almost 7 million barrels a day recently, a level that hasn’t been reached since 1993. AAA predicts gas prices will be cheaper in 2013.”

Source: 2012 Set Record For Most Expensive Gas In US

Just Your Average Infestation: Despite Fears, No More NYC Street Rats Than Normal Since Sandy

November 1st, 2012 11:53 admin View Comments

Hackers’ ‘Zero-Day’ Exploits Stay Secret For Ten Months On Average

October 17th, 2012 10:21 admin View Comments

Security

Sparrowvsrevolution writes “Maybe instead of zero-day vulnerabilities, we should call them -312-day vulnerabilities. That’s how long it takes, on average, for software vendors to become aware of new vulnerabilities in their software after hackers begin to exploit them, according to a study presented by Symantec at an Association of Computing Machinery conference in Raleigh, NC this week. The researchers used data collected from 11 million PCs to correlate a catalogue of zero-day attacks with malware signatures taken from those machines. Using that retrospective analysis, they found 18 attacks that represented zero-day exploits between February 2008 and March of 2010, seven of which weren’t previously known to have been zero-days. And most disturbingly, they found that those attacks continued more than 10 months on average – up to 2.5 years in some cases – before the security community became aware of them. ‘In fact, 60% of the zero-day vulnerabilities we identify in our study were not known before, which suggests that there are many more zero-day attacks than previously thought — perhaps more than twice as many,’ the researchers write.”

Source: Hackers’ ‘Zero-Day’ Exploits Stay Secret For Ten Months On Average

Algorithm Finds Thousands of Unknown Drug Interaction Side Effects

March 15th, 2012 03:38 admin View Comments

Medicine

ananyo writes “An algorithm designed by U.S. scientists to trawl through a plethora of drug interactions has yielded thousands of previously unknown side effects caused by taking drugs in combination (abstract). The work provides a way to sort through the hundreds of thousands of ‘adverse events’ reported to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration each year. The researchers developed an algorithm that would match data from each drug-exposed patient to a nonexposed control patient with the same condition. The approach automatically corrected for several known sources of bias, including those linked to gender, age and disease. The team then used this method to compile a database of 1,332 drugs and possible side effects that were not listed on the labels for those drugs. The algorithm came up with an average of 329 previously unknown adverse events for each drug — far surpassing the average of 69 side effects listed on most drug labels.”

Source: Algorithm Finds Thousands of Unknown Drug Interaction Side Effects

Why People Don’t Live Past 114

February 16th, 2012 02:48 admin View Comments

Medicine

kkleiner writes “Average life expectancy has nearly doubled in developed countries over the 20th century. But a puzzling part to the equation has emerged. While humans are in fact living longer lives on average, the oldest age that the oldest people reach seems to be stubbornly and oddly precisely cemented right at 114. What will it takes for humans to live beyond this limit?”

Source: Why People Don’t Live Past 114

Do You Really Need a Smart Phone?

December 22nd, 2011 12:48 admin View Comments

The Almighty Buck

Roblimo writes “My phone is as stupid as a phone can be, but you can drop it or get it wet and it will still work. My cellular cost per month is about $4, on average. I’ve had a cellular phone longer than most people, and I assure you that a smart phone would not improve my life one bit. You, too, might find that you are just as happy with a stupid phone as with a smart one. If nothing else, you’ll save money by dumbing down your phone.” I stuck with a dumb phone for a long time, but I admit to loving the versatility of my Android phone, for all its imperfections.

Source: Do You Really Need a Smart Phone?

The Average Human Has 60 New Genetic Mutations

June 17th, 2011 06:49 admin View Comments

Biotech

mcgrew pointed out a story about a new study that found the average person is born with 60 genetic mutations, very few of which involve weather manipulation or an amazing healing factor. This number was less than expected, leading the researchers to believe human evolution happens more slowly than previously thought. From the article: “Sixty mutations may sound like a lot, but according to the international team of geneticists behind the new research, it is actually fewer than expected. ‘We had previously estimated that parents would contribute an average of 100 to 200 mistakes to their child,’ Philip Awadalla, a geneticist at the University of Montreal who co-led the project, said in a press release. ‘Our genetic study, the first of its kind, shows that actually much fewer mistakes, or mutations, are made.’

Source: The Average Human Has 60 New Genetic Mutations

Education Incubator Imagine K12 Picks Ten Startups For Its First Class

June 16th, 2011 06:50 admin View Comments

In March we wrote about the launch of Imagine K12, a new startup incubator modeled on Y Combinator that is focused on the education space. It was founded by startup veterans Geoff Ralston, Tim Brady and Alan Louie.

The company sorted through some 200 applications, interviewed 36 startups and made offers to ten startups for the first class this summer. All accepted, took an average of $20,000 in funding for an average of 6% of their equity, and moved to Silicon Valley.

Those startups are now hard at work to launch by the first Imagine K12 demo day in September. They’re also getting lots of attention and mentoring via a weekly dinner and office hours.

The largest team is four people, say Ralston. There are a total of 24 founders among the ten startups.

Source: Education Incubator Imagine K12 Picks Ten Startups For Its First Class

Netflix Compares ISP Streaming Performance

January 28th, 2011 01:50 admin View Comments

Networking boustrophedon writes “The Netflix blog compared streaming performance among 20 top ISPs for the past three months. A Netflix HD stream can provide up to 4800 kbps, but the fastest American ISP, Charter, could sustain only 2667 kbps on average. Most Canadian ISPs beat that, with champ Rogers providing an average of 3020 kbps. Clearwire, Frontier, and CenturyTel were in the doghouse with under 1600 kbps.”

Source: Netflix Compares ISP Streaming Performance

Netflix Compares ISP Streaming Performance

January 28th, 2011 01:50 admin View Comments

Networking

boustrophedon writes “The Netflix blog compared streaming performance among 20 top ISPs for the past three months. A Netflix HD stream can provide up to 4800 kbps, but the fastest American ISP, Charter, could sustain only 2667 kbps on average. Most Canadian ISPs beat that, with champ Rogers providing an average of 3020 kbps. Clearwire, Frontier, and CenturyTel were in the doghouse with under 1600 kbps.”

Source: Netflix Compares ISP Streaming Performance