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Posts Tagged ‘wiretap’

Wiretap Requests From Federal and State Authorities Fell 14% In 2011

July 1st, 2012 07:26 admin View Comments

Crime

coondoggie writes “Federal and state court orders approving the interception of wire, oral or electronic communications dropped 14% in 2011, compared to the number reported in 2010. According to a report issued by the Administrative Office of the United States Courts a total of 2,732 wiretap applications were authorized in 2011 by federal and state courts, with 792 applications by federal authorities and 1,940 applications by 25 states that provide reports. The reduction in wiretaps resulted primarily from a drop in applications for intercepts in narcotics offenses, the report noted.”

Source: Wiretap Requests From Federal and State Authorities Fell 14% In 2011

Canada: Police Do Not Have Power To Wiretap Without Warrant

April 13th, 2012 04:46 admin View Comments

Canada

omega6 sends this excerpt from The Star: “The Supreme Court of Canada struck down Friday warrantless wiretap powers that police have in cases of emergency. … Ruling in a 2006 British Columbia kidnapping case, the country’s top court said a 1993 provision of the Criminal Code is unconstitutional because there is no accountability or oversight for the warrantless searches, either to the person wiretapped or in reports to Parliament. The unanimous ruling was written by rookie judges Michael Moldaver and Andromache Karakatsanis. The case revolves around police intercepting the calls of the family of Peter Li, the kidnap victim.”

Source: Canada: Police Do Not Have Power To Wiretap Without Warrant

Facebook Sued For Violating Wiretap Laws

October 16th, 2011 10:46 admin View Comments

Cloud

An anonymous reader writes “Facebook is being sued in multiple states for tracking its users even after they logged out of the service. All the lawsuits allege the company violated federal wiretap laws. The most recent lawsuit, filed by a Mississippi woman, says: ‘Leading up to September 23, 2011, Facebook tracked, collected, and stored its users’ wire or electronic communications, including but not limited to portions of their internet browsing history even when the users were not logged-in to Facebook. Plaintiff did not give consent or otherwise authorize Facebook to intercept, track, collect, and store her wire or electronic communications, including but not limited to her internet browsing history when not logged-in to Facebook.’”

Source: Facebook Sued For Violating Wiretap Laws

US Wiretap Report Released

July 3rd, 2011 07:30 admin View Comments

Privacy

sTeF writes “According to the 2010 Wiretap Report (Pdf), released today by the Administrative Office of the United States Courts (AOUSC) federal and state requests for court permission to intercept or wiretap electronic communications increased 34% in 2010 over 2009. California, New York, and New Jersey accounted for 68% of all wire taps approved by state judges.”

Source: US Wiretap Report Released

Despite Controversy, Federal Wiretaps On the Rise

June 30th, 2011 06:22 admin View Comments

Privacy

coondoggie writes with a report that “Federal and state requests for court permission to intercept or wiretap electronic communications increased 34% in 2010 over 2009 with California, New York, and New Jersey accounting for 68% of all wire taps approved by state judges. According to the 2010 Wiretap Report, released today by the Administrative Office of the United States Courts (AOUSC) the most frequently noted location in wiretap requests was ‘portable device,’ a category that includes cellular telephones and digital pagers.”

Source: Despite Controversy, Federal Wiretaps On the Rise

FBI Complains About Wiretapping Difficulties Due To Web Services

February 19th, 2011 02:49 admin View Comments

Communications

c0lo writes with news that the Federal Bureau of Investigation is lamenting the difficulty in executing wiretaps because of “web-based e-mail, social-networking and peer-to-peer services.” “President Barack Obama’s administration is debating ways to deal with Web-based services not covered by traditional wiretap laws, including incentives for companies to build in surveillance capabilities, said Valerie Caproni, general counsel at the FBI. Many Internet services are not covered by the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA), which requires traditional telecom carriers to allow law enforcement agencies real-time access to communications after a court has issued a wiretap order, she told members of a subcommittee of the US House of Representatives Judiciary Committee. But Caproni told lawmakers she was not asking for expanded CALEA powers. And she stopped short of calling for rules requiring Web-based communication providers to build in so-called back doors allowing law enforcement access to their software, although she said she’s optimistic the US government can find incentives for companies to ‘have intercept solutions engineered into their systems.’”

Source: FBI Complains About Wiretapping Difficulties Due To Web Services

Obama Wants Broader Internet Wiretap Authority

September 27th, 2010 09:57 admin View Comments

An anonymous reader writes “The White House plans to deliver a bill to Congress next year that will require internet based communication services that use encryption to be capable of decrypting messages to comply with federal wiretap orders?. The bill will go beyond CALEA to apply to services such as Blackberry email. Even though RIM has stated that it does not currently have an ability to decrypt messages via a master key or back door, the bill may require them to. Regarding this development, James Dempsey of the Center for Democracy and Technology commented on the proposal saying, ‘They basically want to turn back the clock and make Internet services function the way that the telephone system used to function.’”

Source: Obama Wants Broader Internet Wiretap Authority

Facing 16 Years In Prison For Videotaping Police

July 26th, 2010 07:26 admin View Comments

krou sends this snip from the Maine Civil Liberties Union: “The ACLU of Maryland is defending Anthony Graber, who faces as much as sixteen years in prison if found guilty of violating state wiretap laws because he recorded video of an officer drawing a gun during a traffic stop. … Once [the Maryland State Police] learned of the video on YouTube, Graber’s parents’ house was raided, searched, and four of his computers were confiscated. Graber was arrested, booked, and jailed. Their actions are a calculated method of intimidation. Another person has since been similarly charged under the same statute. The wiretap law being used to charge Anthony Graber is intended to protect private communication between two parties. According to David Rocah, the ACLU attorney handling Mr. Graber’s case, ‘To charge Graber with violating the law, you would have to conclude that a police officer on a public road, wearing a badge and a uniform, performing his official duty, pulling someone over, somehow has a right to privacy when it comes to the conversation he has with the motorist.’” Here are a factsheet (PDF) on the case from the ACLU of Maryland, and the video at issue.

Source: Facing 16 Years In Prison For Videotaping Police

Cold War Warrantless Wiretapping

April 4th, 2010 04:18 admin View Comments

somanyrobots writes President Gerald Ford secretly authorized the use of warrantless domestic wiretaps for foreign intelligence and counterintelligence purposes soon after coming into office, according to a declassified document. The Dec. 19, 1974 White House memorandum, marked Top Secret / Exclusively Eyes Only and signed by Ford, gave then-Attorney General William B. Saxbe and his successors in office authorization ‘to approve, without prior judicial warrants, specific electronic surveillance within the United States which may be requested by the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.’” And reader jlaprise1 adds, “My research [from 2009] makes the news! President Ford authorized warrantless wiretaps in December 1976 and laid the foundation (PDF) for US telecommunications security policy.”

Source: Cold War Warrantless Wiretapping

FBI Obtains Phone Records With a Post-it Note

January 20th, 2010 01:27 admin View Comments

angry tapir writes “The FBI was so cavalier — and telecom companies so eager to help — that a verbal request or even one written on a Post-it note was enough for operators to hand over customer phone records, according to a damning report (PDF) released on Wednesday by the US Department of Justice Office of the Inspector General.”

Source: FBI Obtains Phone Records With a Post-it Note

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