Archive

Posts Tagged ‘web’

Amazon To Launch Sydney Data Center

November 9th, 2012 11:58 admin View Comments

Australia

schliz writes “Amazon Web Services will unveil its first Australian data centers on Tuesday, ending more than a year of speculation. The move is expected to address enterprises’ data soverignty and latency concerns, although local cloud providers argue that data held by U.S. company Amazon would still be subject to the Patriot Act.”

Source: Amazon To Launch Sydney Data Center

The Web Won’t Be Safe Or Secure Until We Break It

November 7th, 2012 11:58 admin View Comments

Security

CowboyRobot writes “Jeremiah Grossman of Whitehat Security has an article at the ACM in which he outlines the current state of browser security, specifically drive-by downloads. ‘These attacks are primarily written with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, so they are not identifiable as malware by antivirus software in the classic sense. They take advantage of the flawed way in which the Internet was designed to work.’ Grossman’s proposed solution is to make the desktop browser more like its mobile cousins. ‘By adopting a similar application model on the desktop using custom-configured Web browsers (let’s call them DesktopApps), we could address the Internet’s inherent security flaws. These DesktopApps could be branded appropriately and designed to launch automatically to Bank of America’s or Facebook’s Web site, for example, and go no further. Like their mobile application cousins, these DesktopApps would not present an URL bar or anything else making them look like the Web browsers they are on the surface, and of course they would be isolated from one another.’”

Source: The Web Won’t Be Safe Or Secure Until We Break It

Analytics Company Settles Charges For User Tracking

October 24th, 2012 10:25 admin View Comments

Privacy

An anonymous reader writes “A web analytics company has agreed to settle Federal Trade Commission charges that it violated federal law by using its web-tracking software that collected personal data without disclosing the extent of the information that it was collecting. The company, Compete Inc., also allegedly failed to honor promises it made to protect the personal data it collected. KISSmetrics, the developer and seller of the homonymous tool, has agreed to pay up to make the suit go away, but the the two plaintiffs will get only $5,000 each, while the rest of the money — more than half a million dollars — will go to their lawyers for legal fees.”

Source: Analytics Company Settles Charges For User Tracking

EC Sends Statement of Objections To Microsoft For Violating Anti-Trust Agreement

October 24th, 2012 10:33 admin View Comments

Microsoft

dkleinsc writes “Three years ago, Microsoft came to an agreement with EU regulators that required them to provide users with a choice of web browsers. Last July, they found Microsoft in breach of that agreement. Today, they announced that this will result in charges, potentially resulting in fines as large as $7 billion.” Microsoft gets one last chance to defend itself.

Source: EC Sends Statement of Objections To Microsoft For Violating Anti-Trust Agreement

Ask Slashdot: Dedicating Code?

October 14th, 2012 10:03 admin View Comments

Programming

First time accepted submitter The_Buse writes “This week I lost my grandmother and after returning to work (as a web developer) I find myself looking for some way to dedicate something to her memory. Unfortunately, I’m no author so I can’t dedicate a book to her, and I can’t carry a tune so penning a song in her honor is out of the question. What I can do is write one hell of a web app, and after nearly a year of development my (small) team and I are nearing the release date of our next product. My question is, have you ever dedicated a project/app/code in honor of someone? What’s the best way to do it: comment blocks in the header, tongue-in-cheek file names, Easter eggs? Or is this a horrible idea all together?”

Source: Ask Slashdot: Dedicating Code?

Mozilla Details How Old Plugins Will Be Blocked In Firefox 17

October 12th, 2012 10:40 admin View Comments

Firefox

An anonymous reader writes “Last week, Mozilla announced it will prompt Firefox users on Windows with old versions of Adobe Reader, Adobe Flash, and Microsoft Silverlight to update their plugins, but refused to detail how the system will work. Now, the organization has unveiled ‘click-to-play plugin blocks,’ which will be on by default in Firefox 17, starting with the three aforementioned plugins. (Expect more to be added eventually.) Furthermore, you can try out the feature for yourself now in Firefox 17 beta for Windows, Mac, and Linux.” Also coming in Firefox 17 is support for Mozilla’s “Social API.” The announcement describes it thus: “Much like the OpenSearch standard, the Social API enables developers to integrate social services into the browser in a way that is meaningful and helpful to users. As services integrate with Firefox via the Social API sidebar, it will be easy for you to keep up with friends and family anywhere you go on the Web without having to open a new Web page or switch between tabs. You can stay connected to your favorite social network even while you are surfing the Web, watching a video or playing a game.”

Source: Mozilla Details How Old Plugins Will Be Blocked In Firefox 17

Ask Slashdot: How Often Do You Push To Production?

October 11th, 2012 10:03 admin View Comments

Cloud

First time accepted submitter Stiletto writes “I work for a traditional ‘old school’ software company that is trying to move into web services, now competing with smaller, nimbler ‘Web 2.0′ companies. Unfortunately our release process is still stuck in the ’90s. Paperwork and forms, sign-off meetings, and documentation approvals make it impossible to do even minor deployments to production faster than once a month. Major releases go out a couple of times a year. I’ve heard from colleagues in Bay Area companies who release weekly or daily (or even multiple times a day), allowing them to adapt quickly. Slashdotters, how often do you push software changes into production, and what best practices allow you to maintain that deployment rate without chaos?”

Source: Ask Slashdot: How Often Do You Push To Production?

Apple, Microsoft, Google, Others Join Hands To Form WebPlatform.org

October 8th, 2012 10:50 admin View Comments

Businesses

hypnosec writes “Apple, Adobe, Google, HP, Microsoft and many others have joined forces and launched a new resource – the Web Platform in a bid to create a ‘definitive resource’ for all open Web technologies. The companies have come together to provide developers with a single source of all the latest information about HTML5, CSS3, WebGL, SVG and other Web standards. The platform will also offer tips and best practices on web development as well as web technologies. ‘We are an open community of developers building resources for a better web, regardless of brand, browser or platform,’ notes the WebPlatform site.”

Source: Apple, Microsoft, Google, Others Join Hands To Form WebPlatform.org

Learning HTML Through a Board Game

October 8th, 2012 10:20 admin View Comments

Programming

An anonymous reader writes “cHTeMeLe is a board game about writing HTML5 code. In cHTeMeLe, players endorse their favorite web browser (Firefox, Safari, Chrome, Opera, or IE) and then score points by correctly laying out HTML tags, while also trying to bug or crash their opponents’ code. From the article: ‘Despite cHTeMeLe’s technical theme, its developers claim you don’t need any web programming experience to play. The game takes web design standards and boils them down into game rules that even children can learn. To help less technical players keep everything straight, the tag cards use syntax highlighting that different parts of code have unique colors — just like an Integrated Developer Environment. No one is going to completely pick up HTML5 purely by playing cHTeMeLe, but it does have some educational value for understanding basic tags and how they fit together.’”

Source: Learning HTML Through a Board Game

IETF Starts Work On Next-Generation HTTP Standards

October 3rd, 2012 10:09 admin View Comments

The Internet

alphadogg writes “With an eye towards updating the Web to better accommodate complex and bandwidth-hungry applications, the Internet Engineering Task Force has started work on the next generation of HTTP, the underlying protocol for the Web. The HTTP Strict Transport Security (HSTS), is a security protocol designed to protect Internet users from hijacking. The HSTS is an opt-in security enhancement whereby web sites signal browsers to always communicate with it over a secure connection. If the user is using a browser that complies with HSTS policy, the browser will automatically switch to a secure version of the site, using ‘https’ without any intervention of the user. ‘It’s official: We’re working on HTTP/2.0,’ wrote IETF Hypertext Transfer Protocol working group chair Mark Nottingham, in a Twitter message late Tuesday.”

Source: IETF Starts Work On Next-Generation HTTP Standards

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