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Posts Tagged ‘way’

FSF Does Want Secure Boot; They Just Want It Under User Control

December 30th, 2012 12:16 admin View Comments

DRM

Yesterday, we ran a story with the headline “Free Software Foundation Campaigning To Stop UEFI SecureBoot.” It’s more complicated than that, though, writes gnujoshua: “We want computer manufacturers to implement Secure Boot in a way that is secure. If a user can’t disable Secure Boot and they are unable to sign their own software (e.g., bootloader, OS, etc), then we call that particular implementation ‘Restricted Boot.’ We don’t want computer makers to implement Restricted Boot. We want them to implement Secure Boot and to provide a way for individuals to install a fully free OS on their computers. Many computer makers are implementing UEFI Secure Boot in this way, and we want to continue encouraging them to do so.” The complete text of the statement they’d like people to sign reads: “We, the undersigned, urge all computer makers implementing UEFI’s so-called “Secure Boot” to do it in a way that allows free software operating systems to be installed. To respect user freedom and truly protect user security, manufacturers must either allow computer owners to disable the boot restrictions, or provide a sure-fire way for them to install and run a free software operating system of their choice. We commit that we will neither purchase nor recommend computers that strip users of this critical freedom, and we will actively urge people in our communities to avoid such jailed systems.”

Source: FSF Does Want Secure Boot; They Just Want It Under User Control

Ask Slashdot: Easiest Way To Consolidate Household Media?

December 30th, 2012 12:24 admin View Comments

Data Storage

First time accepted submitter Lordfly writes “The wife and I have started looking to buy a house. In the spirit of that, I’ve been giving away books, CDs, and DVDs to ‘downsize’ the pile of crap I’ll have to lug around when we do find the right place. That got me thinking about digital files. I’m perfectly okay with giving up (most) books, CDs, and DVD cases. The only music I buy are MP3s anyway, and we stream most everything else if we wanted to watch a show or movie. That being said, I have a desktop, my wife has an old Macbook, we both have tablets, and I also have an Android smartphone. I’d like to set up something on an extra Windows box shoved in a closet that lets me dump every digital file we have (photos, music, ebooks, movies) and then doles it out as necessary to all of our devices. Unfortunately my best computer geek days are likely behind me (photography and cooking have consumed me since), so while I CAN schlep around a command line, I’ve lost most of my knowledge, so go easy on the ‘just apt-get FubarPackageInstaller.gzip and rd -m Arglebargle’ stuff. Something easy enough for my wife to use would be a major plus. So: What’s the best way to make your own personal ‘cloud’?”

Source: Ask Slashdot: Easiest Way To Consolidate Household Media?

Early Apple Designs Revealed, Courtesy of Harmut Esslinger

December 30th, 2012 12:19 admin View Comments

Apple

SternisheFan writes with an excerpt as carried by CNET of former Apple design chief Harmut Esslinger’s upcoming book, titled Design Forward: Creative Strategies for Sustainable Change. Writing of Steve Job’s integration of design as an essential element across the company as a whole, Esslinger says: “The company’s [then] CEO, Michael Scott, had created different business divisions for each product line, including accessories such as monitors and memory drives. Each division had its own head of design and developed its products the way it wanted to. As a result, Apple’s products shared little in the way of a common design language or overall synthesis In essence, bad design was both the symptom and a contributing cause of Apple’s corporate disease. Steve’s desire to end the disjoined approach gave birth to a strategic design project that would revolutionize Apple’s brand and product lines, change the trajectory of the company’s future, and eventually redefine the way the world thinks about and uses consumer electronics and communication technologies.” CNET shows off a few of those old designs (many of them appearing unsurprisingly fresh), but for much more of them see these images at designboom.

Source: Early Apple Designs Revealed, Courtesy of Harmut Esslinger

Early Apple Designs Revealed, Courtesy of Hartmut Esslinger

December 30th, 2012 12:19 admin View Comments

Apple

SternisheFan writes with an excerpt as carried by CNET of former Apple design chief Hartmut Esslinger’s upcoming book, titled Design Forward: Creative Strategies for Sustainable Change. Writing of Steve Job’s integration of design as an essential element across the company as a whole, Esslinger says: “The company’s [then] CEO, Michael Scott, had created different business divisions for each product line, including accessories such as monitors and memory drives. Each division had its own head of design and developed its products the way it wanted to. As a result, Apple’s products shared little in the way of a common design language or overall synthesis In essence, bad design was both the symptom and a contributing cause of Apple’s corporate disease. Steve’s desire to end the disjoined approach gave birth to a strategic design project that would revolutionize Apple’s brand and product lines, change the trajectory of the company’s future, and eventually redefine the way the world thinks about and uses consumer electronics and communication technologies.” CNET shows off a few of those old designs (many of them appearing unsurprisingly fresh), but for much more of them see these images at designboom.

Source: Early Apple Designs Revealed, Courtesy of Hartmut Esslinger

Open Source Foundations Coming of Age — What Next?

December 25th, 2012 12:42 admin View Comments

Open Source

An article at The H makes the case that many open source foundations have successfully proven their worth and withstood the test of time as legitimate entities. This leads to the question: where do they go from here? The author suggests an umbrella foundation to provide consistent direction across many projects. Quoting; “As you might expect, the main aim of most foundations is to promote their own particular project and its associated programs. For the putative [Open Source Foundation Foundation], that would generalise into promoting open source foundations as a way of supporting open source activity. In practical terms, that might translate into establishing best practice, codifying what needs to be done in order to create an open source foundation in different jurisdictions with their differing legal requirements. That would make it far easier for smaller projects – such as Krita – to draw on that body of knowledge once they have decided to take this route. It might also encourage yet more projects to do the same, encouraged by the existence of support mechanisms that will help them to navigate safely the legal requirements, and to minimise costs by drawing on the experience of others. After all, this is precisely the way open source works, and what makes it so efficient: it tries to avoid re-inventing the wheel by sharing pre-existing solutions to problems or sub-problems.”

Source: Open Source Foundations Coming of Age — What Next?

After 12 years of Development, E17 Is Out

December 21st, 2012 12:12 admin View Comments

Enlightenment

The Enlightenment front page bears this small announcement: “E17 release HAS HAPPENED!” The release announcement is remarkably spartan — it’s mostly a tribute to the dozens of contributors who have worked on the software itself and on translating it into many languages besides system-default English. On the other hand, if you’ve been waiting since December 2000 for E17 (also known as Enlightenment 0.17), you probably have some idea that Enlightenment is a window manager (or possibly a desktop environment: the developers try to defuse any dispute on that front, but suffice it to say that you can think of it either way), and that the coders are more interested in putting out the software that they consider sufficiently done than in incrementing release numbers. That means they’ve made some side trips along the way, Knuth-like, to do things like create an entire set of underlying portable libraries. The release candidate changelog of a few days ago gives an idea of the very latest changes, but this overview shows and tells what to expect in E17. If you’re among those disappointed in the way some desktop environments have tended toward simplicity at the expense of flexibility, you can be sure that Enlightenment runs the other way: “We don’t go quietly into the night and remove options when no one is looking. None of those new big version releases with fanfare and “Hey look! Now with half the options you used to have!”. We sneak in when you least expect it and plant a whole forest of new option seeds, watching them spring to life. We nail new options to walls on a regular basis. We bake options-cakes and hand them out at parties. Options are good. Options are awesome. We have lots of them. Spend some quality time getting to know your new garden of options in E17. It may just finally give you the control you have been pining for.”

Source: After 12 years of Development, E17 Is Out

Learn Linux the Hard Way

December 21st, 2012 12:11 admin View Comments

Education

An anonymous reader writes “Here is a free interactive beta of Learn Linux The Hard Way; a web-based virtual Linux environment which introduces the command line and other essential Linux concepts in 30 exercises. It’s written in the style of Zed A. Shaw’s Learn Code the Hard Way lessons. The authors says, ‘You will encounter many detailed tables containing lists of many fields. You may think you do not need most of this information, but what I am trying to do here is to teach you the right way to approach all this scary data. And this right way is to interpret this data as mathematical formulas, where every single symbol has its meaning.’ Of course, my first entry was rm -rf /* which only produced a stream of errors. I wish I had discovered something like a long time ago.”

Source: Learn Linux the Hard Way

Boeing Uses 20,000 Lbs. of Potatoes To Check Aircraft Wireless Network Signals

December 19th, 2012 12:41 admin View Comments

Image

coondoggie writes “Boeing calls it Project SPUDS — or rather, Synthetic Personnel Using Dielectric Substitution — that is, using sacks of potatoes perched on aircraft seats to test the effectiveness of wireless signals in an airliner cabin. Boeing said it was researching an advanced way to test wireless signals in airplanes and needed a way to effectively simulate 200-300 people sitting in seats throughout the aircraft.”

Source: Boeing Uses 20,000 Lbs. of Potatoes To Check Aircraft Wireless Network Signals

US Security Classifications Needs Re-Thinking, Says Board

December 6th, 2012 12:39 admin View Comments

Government

coondoggie writes “The US government’s overly complicated way of classifying and declassifying information needs to be dumped and reinvented with the help of a huge technology injection if it is to keep from being buried under its own weight. That was one of the main conclusions of a government board tasked with making recommendations on exactly how the government should transform the current security classification system.”

Source: US Security Classifications Needs Re-Thinking, Says Board

Ask Slashdot: DIY 4G Antenna Design For the Holidays?

November 30th, 2012 11:04 admin View Comments

The Internet

eldavojohn writes “This holiday season I will return to the land of my childhood. It is flat and desolate with the nearest major city being a three hour car drive away. Although being able to hear the blood pulse through your ears and enjoying the full milky way is nice, I have finally convinced my parents to get “the internet.” It’s basically a Verizon Jetpack that receives 4G connected to a router. My mom says it works great but she has complained of it cutting in and out. I know where the tower is, this land is so flat and so devoid of light pollution that the tower and all windmills are supernovas on the horizon at night. Usually I use my rooted Galaxy Nexus to read Slashdot, reply to work e-mails, etc. I would like to build an antenna for her 4G device so they can finally enjoy information the way I have. I have access to tons of scrap copper, wood, steel, etc and could probably hit a scrap yard if something else were needed. As a kid, I would build various quad antennas in an attempt to get better radio and TV reception (is the new digital television antenna design any different?) but I have no experience with building 4G antennas. I assume the sizes and lengths would be much different? After shopping around any 4G antenna costs way too much money. So, Slashdot, do you have any resources, suggestions, books, ideas or otherwise about building something to connect to a Jetpack antenna port? I’ve got a Masters of Science but it’s in Computer Science so if you do explain complicated circuits it helps to explain it like I’m five. I’ve used baluns before in antenna design but after pulling up unidirectional and reflector antenna designs, I realize I might be in a little over my head. Is there an industry standard book on building antennas for any spectrum?”

Source: Ask Slashdot: DIY 4G Antenna Design For the Holidays?

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