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Posts Tagged ‘Washington’

Oregon Lawmakers Propose Mileage Tax On Fuel Efficient Vehicles

January 3rd, 2013 01:47 admin View Comments

Government

Hugh Pickens writes writes “Facing a $10 billion dollar revenue shortfall for transportation financing, the Oregon Legislature is expected to consider a bill to require drivers with a vehicle getting at least 55 miles per gallon of gasoline to pay a per-mile tax after 2015 to offset the loss in tax revenue for fuel efficient cars at the gas pump where the government has traditionally collected money to build and fix roads. Oregonians currently pay 30 cents per gallon, a tax that is automatically added at the pump but as cars become more fuel efficient and alternative fuel sources are identified, state officials project gas tax revenue will decline. ‘Everybody uses the road, and if some pay and some don’t, then that’s an unfair situation that’s got to be resolved,’ says Jim Whitty of the Department of Transportation. Opponents of the Oregon proposal say it will hurt a new industry. ‘It will be one more obstacle that the industry and auto dealers will face in convincing consumers to buy these new cars,’ says Paul Cosgrove, a lobbyist for the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers. Other states, such as Nevada and Washington, are also looking at a per-mile charge and a Washington law that would charge electric car owners an annual fee goes into effect in February. Oregon did a pilot study of the mileage tax (PDF) where participants paid 1.56 cents per mile and got a credit for any gasoline tax they paid at the pump. According to the study although initial media portrayals of the system were almost uniformly negative 91% of test participants preferred the mileage tax to paying gas taxes.”

Source: Oregon Lawmakers Propose Mileage Tax On Fuel Efficient Vehicles

World’s Oldest Fossils Found In Australia

January 2nd, 2013 01:12 admin View Comments

Australia

Dexter Herbivore sends this quote from the Washington Post: “Scientists analyzing Australian rocks have discovered traces of bacteria that lived a record-breaking 3.49 billion years ago, a mere billion years after Earth formed. If the find withstands the scrutiny that inevitably faces claims of fossils this old, it could move scientists one step closer to understanding the first chapters of life on Earth. The discovery could also spur the search for ancient life on other planets. These traces of bacteria ‘are the oldest fossils ever described. Those are our oldest ancestors,’ said Nora Noffke, a biogeochemist at Old Dominion University in Norfolk who was part of the group that made the find and presented it last month at a meeting of the Geological Society of America.”

Source: World’s Oldest Fossils Found In Australia

Marijuana Prosecution Not a High Priority, Says Obama

December 15th, 2012 12:16 admin View Comments

Government

Hugh Pickens writes “VOA reports that President Obama says it does not make sense for federal authorities to seek prosecution of recreational marijuana users in states where such use is legal. ‘As it is, you know, the federal government has a lot to do when it comes to criminal prosecutions,’ said Obama during a television interview with ABC’s Barbara Walters . ‘It does not make sense from a prioritization point of view for us to focus on recreational drug users in a state that has already said that, under state law, that’s legal.’ When asked if he supported legalizing marijuana, the president said he was not endorsing that. ‘I wouldn’t go that far, but what I think is that, at this point, Washington and Colorado, you’ve seen the voters speak on this issue.’”

Source: Marijuana Prosecution Not a High Priority, Says Obama

Washington Post To Go Paywall, Along With Buffet-Owned Local Papers

December 7th, 2012 12:23 admin View Comments

Advertising

McGruber writes “The Washington Post reports that the Washington Post, and local newspapers owned by Warren Buffet, are all planning to follow the New York Times and install metered paywalls.” Buffet’s got more than 80 papers right now, and hasn’t quit buying them. There’s some time to read the WaPo sans paywall, but by mid-year it may be up.

Source: Washington Post To Go Paywall, Along With Buffet-Owned Local Papers

Washington Post To Go Paywall, Along With Buffett-Owned Local Papers

December 7th, 2012 12:23 admin View Comments

Advertising

McGruber writes “The Washington Post reports that the Washington Post, and local newspapers owned by Warren Buffett, are all planning to follow the New York Times and install metered paywalls.” Buffett’s got more than 80 papers right now, and hasn’t quit buying them. There’s some time to read the WaPo sans paywall, but by mid-year it may be up.

Source: Washington Post To Go Paywall, Along With Buffett-Owned Local Papers

Washington Post To Go Paywall, Along With Buffett-Owned Local Papers

December 7th, 2012 12:23 admin View Comments

Advertising

McGruber writes “The Washington Post reports that the Washington Post, and local newspapers owned by Warren Buffett, are all planning to follow the New York Times and install metered paywalls.” Buffett’s got more than 80 papers right now, and hasn’t quit buying them. There’s some time to read the WaPo sans paywall, but by mid-year it may be up.

Source: Washington Post To Go Paywall, Along With Buffett-Owned Local Papers

Historians Propose National Park To Preserve Manhattan Project Sites

December 5th, 2012 12:36 admin View Comments

The Military

Hugh Pickens writes writes “William J. Broad writes that a plan now before Congress would create a national park to protect the aging remnants of the atomic bomb project from World War II, including hundreds of buildings and artifacts scattered across New Mexico, Washington and Tennessee — among them the rustic Los Alamos home of Dr. Oppenheimer and his wife, Kitty, and a large Quonset hut, also in New Mexico, where scientists assembled components for the plutonium bomb dropped on Japan. ‘It’s a way to help educate the next generation,’ says Cynthia C. Kelly, president of the Atomic Heritage Foundation, a private group in Washington that helped develop the preservation plan. ‘This is a major chapter of American and world history. We should preserve what’s left.’ Critics have faulted the plan as celebrating a weapon of mass destruction, and have argued that the government should avoid that kind of advocacy. ‘At a time when we should be organizing the world toward abolishing nuclear weapons before they abolish us, we are instead indulging in admiration at our cleverness as a species,’ says Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich. Historians and federal agencies reply that preservation does not imply moral endorsement, and that the remains of so monumental a project should be saved as a way to encourage comprehension and public discussion. A park would be a commemoration, not a celebration, says Heather McClenahan, director of the Los Alamos Historical Society pointing out there are national parks commemorating slavery, Civil War battles and American Indian massacres. ‘It’s a chance to say, “Why did we do this? What were the good things that happened? What were the bad? How do we learn lessons from the past? How do we not ever have to use an atomic bomb in warfare again?” ‘”

Source: Historians Propose National Park To Preserve Manhattan Project Sites

Historians Propose National Park To Preserve Manhattan Project Sites

December 5th, 2012 12:36 admin View Comments

The Military

Hugh Pickens writes writes “William J. Broad writes that a plan now before Congress would create a national park to protect the aging remnants of the atomic bomb project from World War II, including hundreds of buildings and artifacts scattered across New Mexico, Washington and Tennessee — among them the rustic Los Alamos home of Dr. Oppenheimer and his wife, Kitty, and a large Quonset hut, also in New Mexico, where scientists assembled components for the plutonium bomb dropped on Japan. ‘It’s a way to help educate the next generation,’ says Cynthia C. Kelly, president of the Atomic Heritage Foundation, a private group in Washington that helped develop the preservation plan. ‘This is a major chapter of American and world history. We should preserve what’s left.’ Critics have faulted the plan as celebrating a weapon of mass destruction, and have argued that the government should avoid that kind of advocacy. ‘At a time when we should be organizing the world toward abolishing nuclear weapons before they abolish us, we are instead indulging in admiration at our cleverness as a species,’ says Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich. Historians and federal agencies reply that preservation does not imply moral endorsement, and that the remains of so monumental a project should be saved as a way to encourage comprehension and public discussion. A park would be a commemoration, not a celebration, says Heather McClenahan, director of the Los Alamos Historical Society pointing out there are national parks commemorating slavery, Civil War battles and American Indian massacres. ‘It’s a chance to say, “Why did we do this? What were the good things that happened? What were the bad? How do we learn lessons from the past? How do we not ever have to use an atomic bomb in warfare again?” ‘”

Source: Historians Propose National Park To Preserve Manhattan Project Sites

A Tale of Two Companies

December 2nd, 2012 12:05 admin View Comments

Businesses

Rick Zeman writes “They’ve had the best of times, and now they’re living through the worst of times. The Washington Post talks about the dissolution of both Kodak’s and Polaroid’s business models, what Kodak can learn from Polaroid’s earlier mistakes, and the resurrection of some classic Polaroid tech by private entrepreneurs.

Source: A Tale of Two Companies

US Birthrate Plummets To Record Low

November 30th, 2012 11:44 admin View Comments

Earth

Hugh Pickens writes “The Washington Post reports that the U.S. birthrate is at its lowest since 1920, the earliest year with reliable records. The rate decreased to 63.2 births per 1,000 women of childbearing age — a little more than half of its peak, which was in 1957. The overall birthrate decreased by 8 percent between 2007 and 2010, but the decline is being led by immigrant women hit hard by the recession, with a much bigger drop of 14 percent among foreign-born women. Overall, the average number of children a U.S. woman is predicted to have in her lifetime is 1.9, slightly less than the 2.1 children required to maintain current population levels. Although the declining U.S. birthrate has not created the kind of stark imbalances found in graying countries such as Japan or Italy, it should serve as a wake-up call for policymakers, says Roberto Suro, a professor of public policy at the University of Southern California. ‘We’ve been assuming that when the baby-boomer population gets most expensive, that there are going to be immigrants and their children who are going to be paying into [programs for the elderly], but in the wake of what’s happened in the last five years, we have to reexamine those assumptions,’ he said. ‘When you think of things like the solvency of Social Security, for example, relatively small increases in the dependency ratio can have a huge effect.’”

Source: US Birthrate Plummets To Record Low

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