Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Virginia’

Is HP Right? Autonomy Salesperson Shares Internal Emails

January 5th, 2013 01:43 admin View Comments

HP

Julie188 writes “You know how HP said it uncovered $5 billion worth of ‘improper’ revenue at Autonomy? One thing HP has accused Autonomy of doing is booking software-as-a-service contracts as software licensing deals. So how might that type of accounting work? A former Autonomy salesperson fighting a legal battle with HP says she’s seen it happen firsthand. She’s shared internal Autonomy emails and documents that show the details of one deal. ‘[While working for software company CA, Virginia Briody] had closed a four-year $1.22 million hosting/software-as-a-service deal with a customer, Pioneer Investments, and was paid her full commission, over $100,000, she says. Autonomy bought the software unit from CA on June 9, 2010, and Briody became an employee of Autonomy and Autonomy inherited the Pioneer contract. But there was an issue. Autonomy didn’t acquire all the pieces called for in the original contract, Briody says. It didn’t have a partnership with the hosting facility and it didn’t gain from CA a critical piece of compliance software the customer needed, she says. Autonomy needed to find substitutions or Pioneer would cancel the contract, Briody says. So in the fall of 2010, she signed a new deal with Pioneer and walked away with a four-year, $1.859 million contract of which Autonomy execs considered $1.8 million as new revenue, she says.’”

Source: Is HP Right? Autonomy Salesperson Shares Internal Emails

Legislators: ‘Spaceport America Could Become a Ghost Town’

January 4th, 2013 01:05 admin View Comments

Space

RocketAcademy writes “A group of New Mexico legislators is warning that the $200-million Spaceport America ‘could become a ghost town, with tumbleweeds crossing the runways‘ if trial lawyers succeed in blocking critical liability legislation. The warning came in a letter to the Albuquerque Journal [subscription or free trial may be required]. Virgin Galactic has signed a lease to become the spaceport’s anchor tenant, but may pull out if New Mexico is unable to provide liability protection for manufacturers and part suppliers, similar to legislation already passed by Texas, Colorado, Florida, and Virginia. The proposed legislation is also similar to liability protection which New Mexico offers to the ski industry. An eclectic group of business and civic interests has formed the Save Our Spaceport Coalition to support passage of the liability reform legislation, which is being fought by the New Mexico Trial Lawyers Association.”

Source: Legislators: ‘Spaceport America Could Become a Ghost Town’

New York Paper Uses Public Records To Publish Gun-Owner Map

December 25th, 2012 12:17 admin View Comments

Privacy

New submitter Isaac-1 writes “First it was the sex offenders being mapped using public records, not it seems to be gun owners — I wonder who will be next? It seems a newspaper in New York has published an interactive map with the names and addresses of people with [handguns].” It’s happened before: In 2007, Virginia’s Roanoke Times raised the ire of many gun owners by publishing a database of Virginia’s gun permit holders that it assembled based on public records inquiries. (The paper later withdrew that database.) Similarly, WRAL-TV in North Carolina published a database earlier this year with searchable map of (partially redacted) information about permit holders in that state, and Philadelphia made the news for a similar disclosure — complete with interactive map and addresses — of hundreds of gun permit applicants and holders.

Source: New York Paper Uses Public Records To Publish Gun-Owner Map

Virginia Woman Is Sued For $750,000 After Writing Scathing Yelp Review

December 6th, 2012 12:44 admin View Comments

The Courts

First time accepted submitter VegetativeState writes “Jane Perez hired a construction company and was not happy with the work they did and alleged some of her jewelry was stolen. She submitted reviews on Yelp and Angie’s List, giving the company all F’s. The contractor is now suing her for $750,000. From the article: ‘Dietz, the owner of Dietz Development, filed the Internet defamation lawsuit filed last month, stating that “plaintiffs have been harmed by these statements, including lost work opportunities, insult, mental suffering, being placed in fear, anxiety, and harm to their reputations.” Perez’s Yelp review accused the company of damaging her home, charging her for work that wasn’t done and of losing jewelry. The lawsuit follows an earlier case against Perez, which was filed in July 2011 by Dietz for unpaid invoices. According to the recent filing, the two were high school classmates.’”

Source: Virginia Woman Is Sued For $750,000 After Writing Scathing Yelp Review

Roaming Robot May Explore Mysterious Moon Caverns

November 19th, 2012 11:11 admin View Comments

Moon

ananyo writes “William ‘Red’ Whittaker often spends his Sundays lowering a robot into a recently blown up coal mine pit near his cattle ranch in Pennsylvania. By 2015, he hopes that his robot, or something like it, will be rappelling down a much deeper hole, on the Moon. The hole was discovered three years ago when Japanese researchers published images from the satellite SELENE1, but spacecraft orbiting the Moon have been unable to see into its shadowy recesses. A robot might be able to ‘go where the Sun doesn’t shine’, and send back the first-ever look beneath the Moon’s skin, Whittaker told attendees at a meeting of the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) program in Hampton, Virginia, last week. And Whittaker is worth taking seriously-his robots have descended into an Alaskan volcano and helped to clean up the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant.”

Source: Roaming Robot May Explore Mysterious Moon Caverns

Battery-Powered Transmitter Could Crash A City’s 4G Network

November 14th, 2012 11:35 admin View Comments

Network

DavidGilbert99 writes “With a £400 transmitter, a laptop and a little knowledge you could bring down an entire city’s high-speed 4G network. This information comes from research carried out in the U.S. into the possibility of using LTE networks as the basis for a next-generation emergency response communications system. Jeff Reed, director of the wireless research group at Virginia Tech, along with research assistant Marc Lichtman, described the vulnerabilities to the National Telecommunications and Information Administration, which advises the White House on telecom and information policy. ‘If LTE technology is to be used for the air interface of the public safety network, then we should consider the types of jamming attacks that could occur five or ten years from now (PDF). It is very possible for radio jamming to accompany a terrorist attack, for the purpose of preventing communications and increasing destruction,’ Reed said.”

Source: Battery-Powered Transmitter Could Crash A City’s 4G Network

With NCLB Waiver, Virginia Sorts Kids’ Scores By Race

November 13th, 2012 11:32 admin View Comments

Education

According to a story at Northwest Public Radio, the state of Virginia’s board of education has decided to institute different passing scores for standardized tests, based on the racial and cultural background of the students taking the test. Apparently the state has chosen to divide its student population into broad categories of black, white, Hispanic, and Asian — which takes painting with a rather broad brush, to put it mildly. From the article (there’s an audio version linked as well): “As part of Virginia’s waiver to opt out of mandates set out in the No Child Left Behind law, the state has created a controversial new set of education goals that are higher for white and Asian kids than for blacks, Latinos and students with disabilities. … Here’s what the Virginia state board of education actually did. It looked at students’ test scores in reading and math and then proposed new passing rates. In math it set an acceptable passing rate at 82 percent for Asian students, 68 percent for whites, 52 percent for Latinos, 45 percent for blacks and 33 percent for kids with disabilities.” (If officially determined group membership determines passing scores, why stop there?) Florida passed a similar measure last month.

Source: With NCLB Waiver, Virginia Sorts Kids’ Scores By Race

$1,500,000 Fine For Sharing 10 Movies On BitTorrent

November 2nd, 2012 11:44 admin View Comments

Piracy

another random user writes with news that a Virginia man, Kywan Fisher, has been ordered to pay $1,500,000 to porn-maker Flava Works for sharing ten of the company’s films over BitTorrent. “The huge total was reached through penalties of $150,000 per movie, the maximum possible statutory damages under U.S. copyright law.” The man did not make any defense in federal court to Flava Works’ copyright infringement claims, so the judge handed down a default judgement. “In 2011 Fisher and several other defendants were sued by adult entertainment company Flava Works. The case in question differs from the so-called ‘John Doe‘ lawsuits as the copyright holder had detailed information on the defendants who had paid accounts on the company’s movie portal. For Fisher the trouble started when instead of just viewing the films for personal entertainment, he allegedly went on to share copies on BitTorrent. These illicit copies were traced directly back to his account through a code embedded in the videos. … The verdict will be welcomed by Flava and the many other copyright holders involved in BitTorrent lawsuits in the United States. DieTrollDie, a close follower and critic of these cases, points out that it will be widely cited in settlement letters to other defendants, but that the case itself is notably different. ‘This was not the normal Copyright Troll case – there was some actual evidence beyond a public IP address. Not a smoking gun by far, but certainly enough to show a preponderance of evidence,’ DTD writes.

Source: $1,500,000 Fine For Sharing 10 Movies On BitTorrent

Virginia Tech’s RoMeLa Answers DARPA Robotics Challenge With THOR

October 25th, 2012 10:40 admin View Comments

Robotics

smackay writes “Virginia Tech’s Robotics and Mechanisms Laboratory is building a humanoid robot designed for dangerous rescue missions as part of the new DARPA Robotics Challenge. Lab founder/director Dennis Hong calls it the ‘greatest challenge of my career.’ The robot’s name: THOR” From the article: “The task is massive: The adult-sized robot must be designed to enter a vehicle, drive it, and then exit the vehicle, walk over rubble, clear objects blocking a door, open the door, and enter a building. The robot then must visually and audibly locate and shut off a leaking valve, connect a hose or connector, climb an industrial ladder and traverse an industrial walkway. The final and possibly most difficult task: Use a power tool and break through a concrete wall. All these tasks must be accomplished under a set time limit.”

Source: Virginia Tech’s RoMeLa Answers DARPA Robotics Challenge With THOR

3-D Printing Enables UVA Student-Built Unmanned Plane

October 21st, 2012 10:39 admin View Comments

Transportation

In an effort that took four months and $2000, instead of the quarter million dollars and two years they estimate it would have using conventional design methods, a group of University of Virginia engineering students has built and flown an airplane of parts created on a 3-D printer. The plane is 6.5 feet in wingspan, and cruises at 45 mph. I only wish this had been sponsored by Estes or Makerbot rather than the MITRE Corporation; it would be great for every high school or hobbyist group that can scrape together the printing time to have one of these on demand. (HT to Gaël Duval.)

Source: 3-D Printing Enables UVA Student-Built Unmanned Plane

YOYOYOOYOYOYO