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Posts Tagged ‘version’

NVIDIA Releases Fix For Dangerous Display Driver Exploit

January 5th, 2013 01:46 admin View Comments

Security

wiredmikey writes “NVIDIA on Saturday quietly released a driver update (version 310.90) that fixes a recently-uncovered security vulnerability in the NVIDIA Display Driver service (nvvsvc.exe). The vulnerability was disclosed on Christmas day by Peter Winter-Smith, a researcher from the U.K. According to Rapid7′s HD Moore, the vulnerability allows a remote attacker with a valid domain account to gain super-user access to any desktop or laptop running the vulnerable service, and allows an attacker (or rogue user) with a low-privileged account to gain super-access to their own system. In addition to the security fix, driver version 310.90 addresses other bugs and brings performance increases for several games and applications for a number of GPUs including the GeForce 400/500/600 Series.”

Source: NVIDIA Releases Fix For Dangerous Display Driver Exploit

2013 Will Be a Big Year For Private Spaceflight

January 1st, 2013 01:55 admin View Comments

Space

An article at Space.com forecasts an important year for private space companies in 2013. SpaceX is working on a new version of its Dragon capsule that is quite different from the current model. SpaceX CEO Elon Musk said that the first iteration looked similar to other space capsules because the SpaceX team was learning as they went. Now, they’re drawing on the expertise they’ve gained to tailor the new capsule to their needs. “Musk described Dragon version 2 as having ‘legs that pop out’ and added that it uses parachutes and its eight SuperDraco thrusters for a ‘propulsive landing.’” The capsule will hold up to seven people, and they hope to win a crew transportation contract for getting NASA astronauts up to the ISS. The bidding for that contract starts in the second half of 2013. Commercial space planes are also set to reach new heights in 2013. XCOR Aerospace will be building its Lynx I rocket plane, and a spokesman said, “we’ll be doing test fights throughout the year from early 2013 and then go into commercial flights.” Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo will also undergo its first rocket-powered flight this year.

Source: 2013 Will Be a Big Year For Private Spaceflight

GNU C Library 2.17 Announced, Includes Support For 64-bit ARM

December 27th, 2012 12:03 admin View Comments

GNU is Not Unix

hypnosec writes “A new version of GNU C Library (glibc) has been released and with this new version comes support for the upcoming 64-bit ARM architecture a.k.a. AArch64. Version 2.17 of glibc not only includes support for ARM, it also comes with better support for cross-compilation and testing; optimized versions of memcpy, memset, and memcmp for System z10 and zEnterprise z196; and optimized version of string functions, on top of some quite a few other performance improvements, states the mailing list release announcement. Glibc v 2.17 can be used with a minimum Linux kernel version 2.6.16.”

Source: GNU C Library 2.17 Announced, Includes Support For 64-bit ARM

Instagram: We Won’t Sell Your Photos

December 18th, 2012 12:00 admin View Comments

Privacy

hugheseyau writes “Earlier, we discussed news that Instagram introduced a new version of their Privacy Policy and Terms of Service that will take effect in thirty days. The changes seemed to allow Instagram to sell users’ photos, and many users were upset. Instagram now says ‘it is not our intention to sell your photos’ and that ‘users own their content and Instagram does not claim any ownership rights over your photos.’ This is good news for Instagram users.” And so closes another chapter of “We Let Lawyers Write a Legal Document and The Internet Freaked Out.”

Source: Instagram: We Won’t Sell Your Photos

Google Axes Free Google Apps For Businesses

December 7th, 2012 12:32 admin View Comments

Cloud

New submitter Macfox writes “In a move to focus on serving small business better, Google has axed the popular free edition of Google Apps for businesses. From Dec 6th, it will not be possible to sign up for the free edition. In a statement to the Wall Street Journal, Google’s senior vice president in charge of Google Apps said Google wants to provide small businesses that use the free version of the software with dedicated customer support — something only paying customers currently get. ‘We’re not serving them well,’ he said of the free users.” Google’s blog post notes that “this change has no impact on our existing customers, including those using the free version.”

Source: Google Axes Free Google Apps For Businesses

Google’s Schmidt: Patent Wars Harm Startups

December 5th, 2012 12:36 admin View Comments

Google

Nerval’s Lobster writes “Former Google CEO Eric Schmidt opened up to The Wall Street Journal in a Dec. 4 interview. Among the topics covered: the status of his company’s ongoing patent war with Apple, as well as its attempts to make the Android mobile operating system more of a revenue giant. In Schmidt’s mind, startups have the most to lose in the current patent wars: ‘There’s a young [Android co-founder] Andy Rubin trying to form a new version of Danger [the smartphone company Mr. Rubin co-founded before Android]. How is he or she going to be able to get the patent coverage necessary to offer version one of their product? That’s the real consequence of this.’”

Source: Google’s Schmidt: Patent Wars Harm Startups

Toward An FSF-Endorsable Embedded Processor

December 4th, 2012 12:20 admin View Comments

Hardware Hacking

lkcl writes about his effort to go further than others have, and actually have a processor designed for Free Software manufactured: “A new processor is being put together — one that is FSF Endorseable, contains no proprietary hardware engines, yet an 800MHz 8-core version would, at 38 GFLOPS, be powerful enough on raw GFLOPS performance figures to take on the 3ghz AMD Phenom II x4 940, the 3GHz Intel i7 920 and other respectable mid-range 100 Watt CPUs. The difference is: power consumption in 40nm for an 8-core version would be under 3 watts. The core design has been proven in 65nm, and is based on a hybrid approach, with its general-purpose instruction set being designed from the ground up to help accelerate 3D Graphics and Video Encode and Decode, an 8-core 800mhz version would be capable of 1080p30 H.264 decode, and have peak 3D rates of 320 million triangles/sec and a peak fill rate of 1600 million pixels/sec. The unusual step in the processor world is being taken to solicit input from the Free Software Community at large before going ahead with putting the chip together. So have at it: if given carte blanche, what interfaces and what features would you like an FSF-Endorseable mass-volume processor to have? (Please don’t say ‘DRM’ or ‘built-in spyware’).” There’s some discussion on arm-netbook. This is the guy behind the first EOMA-68 card (currently nearing production). As a heads ups, we’ll be interviewing him in a live style similarly to Woz (although intentionally this time) next Tuesday.

Source: Toward An FSF-Endorsable Embedded Processor

GOG: How an Indie Game Store Took On the Pirates and Won

November 27th, 2012 11:19 admin View Comments

DRM

An anonymous reader writes “As if we needed further proof that DRM really is more trouble for publishers and consumers than it’s worth, Good Old Games, the DRM-free download store that specializes in retro games, has yet more damning evidence. In an interview this week, the store’s managing director says that its first venture into day one releases earlier this year with Witcher 2 was a storming success — and the version that hit the torrent sites was a cracked DRM version bought from a shop. The very definition of irony.”

Source: GOG: How an Indie Game Store Took On the Pirates and Won

Book Review: Version Control With Git, 2nd Edition

November 26th, 2012 11:45 admin View Comments

Image

kfogel writes “Two thumbs up, and maybe a tentacle too, on Version Control with Git, 2nd Edition by Jon Loeliger and Matthew McCullough. If you are a working programmer who wants to learn more about Git, particularly a programmer familiar with a Unix-based development environment, then this is the book for you, hands down (tentacles down too, please).” Read below for the rest of Karl’s review.

Version Control with Git, 2nd Edition
author Jon Loeliger, Matthew McCullough
pages 456
publisher O’Reilly Media
rating Very good.
reviewer Karl Fogel
ISBN 978-1-4493-1638-9
summary Using the Git version control system for collaborative programming.

Source: Book Review: Version Control With Git, 2nd Edition

THQ Clarifies Claims of “Horrible, Slow” Wii U CPU

November 24th, 2012 11:35 admin View Comments

Nintendo

An anonymous reader writes “THQ has clarified comments made by 4A Games’ chief technical officer, Oles Shishkovtsov, about why their upcoming first-person shooter, Metro, won’t be available for Nintendo’s new Wii U console. Shishkovtsov had told NowGamer, ‘[The] Wii U has a horrible, slow CPU,’ by way of explaining why a Wii U version of Metro wasn’t in the works. Now, THQ’s Huw Beynon has provided a more thorough (and more diplomatic) explanation: ‘It’s a very CPU intensive game. I think it’s been verified by plenty of other sources, including your own Digital Foundry guys, that the CPU on Wii U on the face of it isn’t as fast as some of the other consoles out there. Lots of developers are finding ways to get around that because of other interesting parts of the platform. … We genuinely looked at what it would take to bring the game to Wii U. It’s certainly possible, and it’s something we thought we’d like to do. The reality is that would mean a dedicated team, dedicated time and effort, and it would either result in a detriment to what we’re trying to focus on or we probably wouldn’t be able to do the Wii U version the justice that we’d want.’”

Source: THQ Clarifies Claims of “Horrible, Slow” Wii U CPU