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Posts Tagged ‘University’

Forbes 2013 Career List Flamed By University Professors

January 5th, 2013 01:45 admin View Comments

Education

An anonymous reader writes “The Forbes list of ‘least stressful jobs’ for 2013 is headlined by… university professors. This comes at a time in which the academic community has been featured on controversies about 100-hour week work journeys, doctors live on food stamps, tenured staff is laid off large science institutions, and the National Science Foundation suffers severe budget cuts, besides the well known (and sometimes publicized) politics of publish or perish. The Forbes reporter has received abundant feedback and published a shy, foot-note ‘addendum’; however, the cited source, CareerCast (which does not map to any recognizable career journalist, but rather to a Sports writer), does not seem to have had the same luck. The comments of the Forbes reporter on the existence of a Summer break for graduates (‘I am curious whether professors work that hard over the summer’) are particularly noteworthy.” Here is the CareerCast report the article is based on, and a list of the “stress factors” they considered. The author of the Forbes article passed on a very detailed explanation of how tough a university professor’s job can be.

Source: Forbes 2013 Career List Flamed By University Professors

Why Girls Do Better At School

January 4th, 2013 01:39 admin View Comments

Education

An anonymous reader writes “A new study explains why girls do better at school, even when their scores on standardized tests remain low. Researchers from University of Georgia and Columbia University say the variation in school grades between boys and girls may be because girls have a better attitude toward learning than boys. One of the study’s lead authors, Christopher Cornwell, said, ‘The skill that matters the most in regards to how teachers graded their students is what we refer to as “approaches toward learning.” You can think of “approaches to learning” as a rough measure of what a child’s attitude toward school is: It includes six items that rate the child’s attentiveness, task persistence, eagerness to learn, learning independence, flexibility and organization. I think that anybody who’s a parent of boys and girls can tell you that girls are more of all of that.’ Cornwell went on about what effect this has had now that education has become more pervasive: ‘We seem to have gotten to a point in the popular consciousness where people are recognizing the story in these data: Men are falling behind relative to women. Economists have looked at this from a number of different angles, but it’s in educational assessments that you make your mark for the labor market. Men’s rate of college going has slowed in recent years whereas women’s has not, but if you roll the story back far enough, to the 60s and 70s, women were going to college in much fewer numbers. It’s at a point now where you’ve got women earning upward of 60 percent of the bachelors’ degrees awarded every year.’”

Source: Why Girls Do Better At School

Jury Hits Marvell With $1 Billion+ Fine Over CMU Patents

December 27th, 2012 12:47 admin View Comments

Google

Dupple writes with news carried by the BBC of a gigantic tech-patent case that (seemingly for once) doesn’t involve Samsung, Apple, Microsoft, or Google: “‘U.S. chipmaker Marvell Technology faces having to pay one of the biggest ever patent damage awards. A jury in Pittsburgh found the firm guilty of infringing two hard disk innovations owned by local university Carnegie Mellon.’ Though the company claims that the CMU patents weren’t valid because the university hadn’t invented anything new, saying a Seagate patent of 14 months earlier described everything that the CMU patents do, the jury found that Marvell’s chips infringed claim 4 of Patent No. 6,201,839 and claim 2 of Patent No. 6,438,180. “method and apparatus for correlation-sensitive adaptive sequence detection” and “soft and hard sequence detection in ISI memory channels.’ ‘It said Marvell should pay $1.17bn (£723m) in compensation — however that sum could be multiplied up to three times by the judge because the jury had also said the act had been “wilful.” Marvell’s shares fell more than 10%.’”

Source: Jury Hits Marvell With $1 Billion+ Fine Over CMU Patents

Peel-and-Stick Solar Cells Created At Stanford University

December 24th, 2012 12:59 admin View Comments

Power

cylonlover writes “Traditionally, thin-film solar cells are made with rigid glass substrates, limiting their potential applications. Flexible versions do exist, although they require special production techniques and/or materials. Now, however, scientists from Stanford University have created thin, flexible solar cells that are made from standard materials – and they can applied to just about any surface, like a sticker. The cells have been successfully applied to a variety of both flat and curved surfaces – including glass, plastic and paper – without any loss of efficiency. Not only does the new process allow for solar cells to applied to things like mobile devices, helmets, dashboards or windows, but the stickers are reportedly both lighter and less costly to make than equivalent-sized traditional photovoltaic panels. There’s also no waste involved, as the silicon/silicon dioxide wafers can be reused.”

Source: Peel-and-Stick Solar Cells Created At Stanford University

UK Students Protest Biometric Scanner Move

December 15th, 2012 12:16 admin View Comments

Education

Presto Vivace writes that the UK’s Newcastle University is instituting a finger-print based attendance system. From the linked article: “University students may have to scan their fingerprints in future — to prove they are not bunking off lectures. … Newcastle Free Education Network has organised protests against the plans, claiming the scanners would ‘turn universities into border checkpoints’ and ‘reduce university to the attendance of lectures alone.’” The system is supposed to bring the university “in line with the UK Border Agency (UKBA) and clamp down on illegal immigrants.”

Source: UK Students Protest Biometric Scanner Move

University of Chicago Receives Mystery Indiana Jones Package

December 15th, 2012 12:10 admin View Comments

It's funny. Laugh.

First time accepted submitter VanGarrett writes “Someone at the University of Chicago went through a lot of trouble to baffle a few people, with an old timey package addressed to Indiana Jones. From the article: ‘The package contained an incredibly detailed replica of “University of Chicago Professor” Abner Ravenwood’s journal from Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark. It looks only sort of like this one, but almost exactly like this one, so much so that we thought it might have been the one that was for sale on Ebay had we not seen some telling inconsistencies in cover color and “Ex Libris” page (and distinct lack of sword). The book itself is a bit dusty, and the cover is teal fabric with a red velvet spine, with weathered inserts and many postcards/pictures of Marion Ravenwood (and some cool old replica money) included. It’s clear that it is mostly, but not completely handmade, as although the included paper is weathered all of the “handwriting” and calligraphy lacks the telltale pressure marks of actual handwriting.’”

Source: University of Chicago Receives Mystery Indiana Jones Package

Seattle To Get Gigabit Fiber To the Home and Business

December 13th, 2012 12:01 admin View Comments

Networking

symbolset writes “Enthusiasm about Google’s Kansas City fiber project is overwhelming. But in the Emerald City, the government doesn’t want to wait. They have been stringing fiber throughout the city for years, and today announced a deal with company Gigabit Squared and the University of Washington to serve fiber to 55,000 Seattle homes and businesses with speeds up to a gigabit. The city will lease out the unused fiber, but will not have ownership in the provider nor a relationship with the end customers. The service rollout is planned to complete in 2014. It is the first of 6 planned university area network projects currently planned by Gigabit Squared.”

Source: Seattle To Get Gigabit Fiber To the Home and Business

Australian Uni’s Underground, Robot-Staffed Library

December 12th, 2012 12:10 admin View Comments

Australia

angry tapir writes “As part of a $1 billion upgrade of its city campus, the University of Technology, Sydney is installing an underground automated storage and retrieval system (ASRS) for its library collection. The ASRS is in response to the need to house a growing collection and free up physical space for the new ‘library of the future’, which is to open in 2015 to 2016, so that people can be at the center of the library rather than the books. The ASRS, which will connect to the new library, consists of six 15-meter high robotic cranes that operate bins filled with books. When an item is being stored or retrieved, the bins will move up and down aisles as well as to and from the library. Items will be stored in bins based on their spine heights. About 900,000 items will be stored underground, starting with 60 per cent of the library’s collection and rising to 80 per cent. About 250,000 items purchased from the last 10 years will be on open shelves in the library. As items age, they will be relegated to the underground storage facility. The University of Chicago has invested in a similar system.”

Source: Australian Uni’s Underground, Robot-Staffed Library

Scientists Race To Establish the First Links of a ‘Quantum Internet’

December 5th, 2012 12:20 admin View Comments

China

ananyo writes “Two teams of researchers — once rivals, now collaborators — are racing to use the powers of subatomic physics to create a super-secure global communication network. The teams — one led by Jian-Wei Pan at the University of Science and Technology of China, the other by his former PhD supervisor Anton Zeilinger of the University of Vienna — have spent the last 7 years beating each other’s distance records for long-distance quantum-teleportation. They now plan to create the first intercontinental quantum-secured network, connecting Asia to Europe by satellite.”

Source: Scientists Race To Establish the First Links of a ‘Quantum Internet’

First Direct Image of DNA Double Helix

December 1st, 2012 12:29 admin View Comments

Technology

New submitter bingbat writes “Scientists at the University at Genoa, Italy have successfully photographed the double-helix structure of a single strand of DNA, using a tunneling electron microscope. This marks the first visual confirmation of its structure.” The full paper is behind a paywall, but the linked abstract includes the picture that’s worth a thousand words.

Source: First Direct Image of DNA Double Helix