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Posts Tagged ‘U.S.’

Bloomberg: Steve Jobs Behind NYC Crime Wave

December 29th, 2012 12:33 admin View Comments

Cellphones

theodp writes “Rudy Giuliani had John Gotti to worry about; Mike Bloomberg has Steve Jobs. Despite all-time lows for the city in homicides and shootings, NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg said overall crime in New York City was up 3.3% in 2012 due to iPhone, iPad and other Apple device thefts, which have increased by 3,890 this year. ‘If you just took away the jump in Apple, we’d be down for the year,’ explained Marc La Vorgna, the mayor’s press secretary. ‘The proliferation of people carrying expensive devices around is so great,’ La Vorgna added. ‘It’s something that’s never had to be dealt with before.’ Bloomberg also took to the radio, urging New Yorkers who didn’t want to become a crime statistic to keep their iDevices in an interior, hard-to-reach pocket: ‘Put it in a pocket in sort of a more body-fitting, tighter clothes, that you can feel if it was — if somebody put their hand in your pocket, not just an outside coat pocket.’ But it seems the best way to fight the iCrime Wave might be to slash the $699 price of an iPhone (unactivated), which costs an estimated $207 to make. The U.S. phone subsidy model reportedly adds $400+ to the price of an iPhone. So, is offering unlocked alternatives at much more reasonable prices than an iPhone — like the $299 Nexus 4, for starters — the real key to taking a bite out of cellphone crime? After all, didn’t dramatic price cuts pretty much kill car stereo theft?”

Source: Bloomberg: Steve Jobs Behind NYC Crime Wave

FCC Smooths the Path For Airlines’ In-Flight Internet

December 28th, 2012 12:52 admin View Comments

Government

The Washington Post reports on a development that may push Internet access on commercial aircraft from a pleasant luxury (but missing on most U.S. domestic flights) to commonplace. Writes the Post: “The Federal Communications Commission on Friday approved an application process for airlines to obtain broadband Internet licenses aboard their planes. Previously, airlines were granted permission on an ad hoc basis. Airlines need the FCC’s permission to tap into satellite airwaves while in flight that enable passengers to access the Internet. They also need permission from the Federal Aviation Administration, which oversees the safety of inflight Internet systems.” I hope that on-board Internet not only becomes the default, but that free advertising-backed access does, too; especially for short flights, the “24-hour pass” paid access I’ve seen on United and Delta is tempting, but too pricey.

Source: FCC Smooths the Path For Airlines’ In-Flight Internet

How ISPs Collude To Offer Poor Service

December 28th, 2012 12:06 admin View Comments

Businesses

alexander_686 writes “Bloomberg is running a series of articles from Susan Crawford about the stagnation of internet access in the U.S., and why consumers in America pay more for slower service. Quoting: ‘The two kinds of Internet-access carriers, wired and wireless, have found they can operate without competing with each other. The cable industry and AT&T-Verizon have divided up the world much as Comcast and Time Warner did; only instead of, “You take Philadelphia, I’ll take Minneapolis,” it’s, “You take wired, I’ll take wireless.” At the end of 2011, the two industries even agreed to market each other’s services.’ I am a free market type of guy. I do recognize the abuse that can come from natural monopolies that utilities tend to have, but I have never considered this type of collusion before. To fix the situation, Crawford recommends that the U.S. ‘move to a utility model, based on the assumption that all Americans require fiber-optic Internet access at reasonable prices.’”

Source: How ISPs Collude To Offer Poor Service

Facebook Paid 0.3% Taxes On $1.34 Billion Profits

December 28th, 2012 12:14 admin View Comments

Facebook

theodp writes “Facebook is unlikely to make many new (non-investor) friends with reports that it paid Irish taxes of about $4.64 million on its entire non-U.S. profits of $1.344 billion for 2011. ‘Facebook operates a second subsidiary that is incorporated in Ireland but controlled in the Cayman Islands,’ Kenneth Thomas explains. ‘This subsidiary owns Facebook Ireland, but the setup allows the two companies to be considered as one for U.S. tax purposes, but separate for Irish tax purposes. The Caymans-operated subsidiary owns the rights to use Facebook’s intellectual property outside the U.S., for which Facebook Ireland pays hefty royalties to use. This lets Facebook Ireland transfer the profits from low-tax Ireland to no-tax Cayman Islands.’ In 2008, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg cited ‘local world-class talent’ as the motivation behind Facebook’s choice of tax-haven Dublin for its international HQ. Similar tax moves by Google, Microsoft, and others who have sought the luck-of-the-Double-Irish present quite a dilemma for tax revenue-seeking governments. Invoking Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart’s famous common sense definition of ethics (‘Ethics is knowing the difference between what you have a right to do and what is right to do’) is unlikely to sway corporations whose top execs send the message that tax avoidance is the right thing to do and something to be proud of.”

Source: Facebook Paid 0.3% Taxes On $1.34 Billion Profits

Britain Suspends Exploratory Drilling of Antarctic Lake

December 27th, 2012 12:00 admin View Comments

United Kingdom

A British plan to blast a path through more than two miles of ice to reach an Antarctic lake has been suspended because of technical problems. From the article: “In a move that clears the way for U.S. and Russian teams to take the lead, Professor Martin Siegert said technical problems and a lack of fuel had forced the closure on Christmas Day of the 7-million-pound ($11 million) project, which was looking for life forms and climate change clues in the lake-bed sediment. ‘This is of course, hugely frustrating for us, but we have learned a lot this year,’ said Siegert of the University of Bristol, principal investigator for the mission, which was headed by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS). ‘By the end, the equipment was working well, and much of it has now been fully field-tested,’ he said on the BAS website.”

Source: Britain Suspends Exploratory Drilling of Antarctic Lake

Israel To Get Massive Countrywide Optical Upgrade

December 27th, 2012 12:50 admin View Comments

Networking

A Google Fiberhood-style rollout in the U.S., says a Goldman-Sachs estimate, would cost in the neighborhood of $140 billion. Even for Israel, a country approximately the size of New Jersey, there’s a high pricetag (“billions of shekels”) for installing fiber optics dense enough to reach most of the population, but just a massive fiber-optic rollout is planned, with the project led by Swedish firm Viaeuropa. If the scheme succeeds, it will cover two thirds of the country over the next 10 years or so.

Source: Israel To Get Massive Countrywide Optical Upgrade

Samsung Retaliates Against Ericsson With Patent Complaint

December 27th, 2012 12:02 admin View Comments

Patents

An anonymous reader writes “The wireless patent wars don’t pause at Christmas time, keeping numerous IP lawyers (and a certain litigation watcher) busy even at this time of year. No one seriously expected Samsung to turn the other cheek when Ericsson sued it and requested a U.S. import ban against a host of Galaxy devices. The Korean electronics giant, which is increasingly competing with Ericsson in the telecoms infrastructure market, just filed an ITC complaint of its own. The title of the complaint is Certain Wireless Communication Equipment and Articles Therein. That description would apply to dozens, no: hundreds, of patent lawsuits in the world. The complaint has not been published yet, but it would be out of character for Samsung not to assert some of its patents on wireless industry standards (and maybe some others, too).” (Also at the BBC.)

Source: Samsung Retaliates Against Ericsson With Patent Complaint

Jury Hits Marvell With $1 Billion+ Fine Over CMU Patents

December 27th, 2012 12:47 admin View Comments

Google

Dupple writes with news carried by the BBC of a gigantic tech-patent case that (seemingly for once) doesn’t involve Samsung, Apple, Microsoft, or Google: “‘U.S. chipmaker Marvell Technology faces having to pay one of the biggest ever patent damage awards. A jury in Pittsburgh found the firm guilty of infringing two hard disk innovations owned by local university Carnegie Mellon.’ Though the company claims that the CMU patents weren’t valid because the university hadn’t invented anything new, saying a Seagate patent of 14 months earlier described everything that the CMU patents do, the jury found that Marvell’s chips infringed claim 4 of Patent No. 6,201,839 and claim 2 of Patent No. 6,438,180. “method and apparatus for correlation-sensitive adaptive sequence detection” and “soft and hard sequence detection in ISI memory channels.’ ‘It said Marvell should pay $1.17bn (£723m) in compensation — however that sum could be multiplied up to three times by the judge because the jury had also said the act had been “wilful.” Marvell’s shares fell more than 10%.’”

Source: Jury Hits Marvell With $1 Billion+ Fine Over CMU Patents

How Do YOU Establish a Secure Computing Environment?

December 26th, 2012 12:54 admin View Comments

Security

sneakyimp writes “We’ve seen increasingly creative ways for bad guys to compromise your system like infected pen drives, computers preloaded with malware, mobile phone apps with malware, and a $300 app that can sniff out your encryption keys. On top of these obvious risks, there are lingering questions about the integrity of common operating systems and cloud computing services. Do Windows, OSX, and Linux have security holes? Does Windows supply a backdoor for the U.S. or other governments? Should you really trust your Linux multiverse repository? Do Google and Apple data mine your private mobile phone data for private information? Does Ubuntu’s sharing of my data with Amazon compromise my privacy? Can the U.S. Government seize your cloud data without a warrant? Can McAfee or Kaspersky really be trusted? Naturally, the question arises of how to establish and maintain an ironclad workstation or laptop for the purpose of handling sensitive information or doing security research. DARPA has approached the problem by awarding a $21.4M contract to Invincea to create a secure version of Android. What should we do if we don’t have $21.4M USD? Is it safe to buy a PC from any manufacturer? Is it even safe to buy individual computer components and assemble one’s own machine? Or might the motherboard firmware be compromised? What steps can one take to ensure a truly secure computing environment? Is this even possible? Can anyone recommend a through checklist or suggest best practices?”

Source: How Do YOU Establish a Secure Computing Environment?

Iran Claims New Cyberattacks On Industrial Sites

December 25th, 2012 12:50 admin View Comments

Security

wiredmikey writes “Iranian officials on Tuesday said a ‘Stuxnet-like’ cyberattack hit some industrial units in a southern province. ‘A virus had penetrated some manufacturing industries in Hormuzgan province, but its progress was halted,’ Ali Akbar Akhavan said, quoted by the ISNA news agency. Akhavan said the malware was ‘Stuxnet-like’ but did not elaborate, and that the attack had occurred over the ‘past few months.’ One of the targets of the latest attack was the Bandar Abbas Tavanir Co, which oversees electricity production and distribution in Hormuzgan and adjacent provinces. He also accused ‘enemies’ of constantly seeking to disrupt operations at Iran’s industrial units through cyberattacks, without specifying how much damage had been caused. Iran has blamed the U.S. and Israel for cyberattacks in the past. In April, it said a voracious malware attack had hit computers running key parts of its oil sector and succeeded in wiping data off official servers.”

Source: Iran Claims New Cyberattacks On Industrial Sites

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