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Posts Tagged ‘twitter’

Twitter Enables Archive Option

December 17th, 2012 12:53 admin View Comments

Privacy

judgecorp writes “Twitter has delivered on a long-promised feature which allows some users to download their entire Tweet history. The service was promised months ago by CEO Dick Costolo and equivalent features are already available at Facebook. At this stage, only some users can download their archive, and it’s not clear how it will be rolled out to all users.”

Source: Twitter Enables Archive Option

Google+ Chief Grounded From Twitter By Larry Page

December 16th, 2012 12:31 admin View Comments

Google

theodp writes Vic Gundotra, formerly Sr. VP of Social (and now, of Engineering) at Google, and head of the company’s social networking service Google+, hasn’t posted anything on his Twitter account since July 2011. Why? Responding to a question about his own social networking behavior at SMX 2012, Gundotra explained that he was asked by Google CEO Larry Page not to tweet anymore. ‘I was asked not to tweet again.’ Gundotra said (video). ‘I was asked not to do that by my boss [Page]. I tweeted a tweet about two companies [Microsoft, Nokia] that went viral, went very very viral and made a lot of headline news.’ So, what does it say when the Google CEO who reportedly tied all Googlers’ bonuses to social networking apparently finds it too dangerous to permit the head of Google+ to participate in social networking?”

Source: Google+ Chief Grounded From Twitter By Larry Page

Researchers Develop an Internet Truth Machine

December 16th, 2012 12:25 admin View Comments

The Internet

Hugh Pickens writes writes “Will Oremus writes that when something momentous is unfolding—the Arab Spring, Hurricane Sandy, Friday’s horrific elementary school shooting in Connecticut—Twitter is the world’s fastest, most comprehensive, and least reliable source of breaking news and in ongoing events like natural disasters, the results of Twitter misinformation can be potentially deadly. During Sandy, for instance, some tweets helped emergency responders figure out where to direct resources. Others provoked needless panic, such as one claiming that the Coney Island hospital was on fire, and a few were downright dangerous, such as the one claiming that people should stop using 911 because the lines were jammed. Now a research team at Yahoo has analyzed tweets from Chile’s 2010 earthquake and looked at the potential of machine-learning algorithms to automatically assess the credibility of information tweeted during a disaster. A machine-learning classifier developed by the researchers uses 16 features to assess the credibility of newsworthy tweets and identified the features that make information more credible: credible tweets tend to be longer and include URLs; credible tweeters have higher follower counts; credible tweets are negative rather than positive in tone; and credible tweets do not include question marks, exclamation marks, or first- or third-person pronouns. Researchers at India’s Institute of Information Technology also found that credible tweets are less likely to contain swear words (PDF) and significantly more likely to contain frowny emoticons than smiley faces. The bottom line is that an algorithm has the potential to work much faster than a human, and as it improves, it could evolve into an invaluable ‘first opinion’ for flagging news items on Twitter that might not be true writes Oremus. ‘Even that wouldn’t fully prevent Twitter lies from spreading or misleading people. But it might at least make their purveyors a little less comfortable and a little less smug.’”

Source: Researchers Develop an Internet Truth Machine

The Web We Lost

December 14th, 2012 12:29 admin View Comments

Social Networks

An anonymous reader writes “Anil Dash has an insightful post about cutting through the social media hype to see all of the social functionality we’ve lost on the web over the past decade. ‘We’ve lost key features that we used to rely on, and worse, we’ve abandoned core values that used to be fundamental to the web world. To the credit of today’s social networks, they’ve brought in hundreds of millions of new participants to these networks, and they’ve certainly made a small number of people rich. But they haven’t shown the web itself the respect and care it deserves, as a medium which has enabled them to succeed. And they’ve now narrowed the possibilities of the web for an entire generation of users who don’t realize how much more innovative and meaningful their experience could be. … We get bulls*** turf battles like Tumblr not being able to find your Twitter friends or Facebook not letting Instagram photos show up on Twitter because of giant companies pursuing their agendas instead of collaborating in a way that would serve users. And we get a generation of entrepreneurs encouraged to make more narrow-minded, web-hostile products like these because it continues to make a small number of wealthy people even more wealthy, instead of letting lots of people build innovative new opportunities for themselves on top of the web itself.’”

Source: The Web We Lost

The Web We Lost

December 14th, 2012 12:29 admin View Comments

Social Networks

An anonymous reader writes “Anil Dash has an insightful post about cutting through the social media hype to see all of the social functionality we’ve lost on the web over the past decade. ‘We’ve lost key features that we used to rely on, and worse, we’ve abandoned core values that used to be fundamental to the web world. To the credit of today’s social networks, they’ve brought in hundreds of millions of new participants to these networks, and they’ve certainly made a small number of people rich. But they haven’t shown the web itself the respect and care it deserves, as a medium which has enabled them to succeed. And they’ve now narrowed the possibilities of the web for an entire generation of users who don’t realize how much more innovative and meaningful their experience could be. … We get bulls*** turf battles like Tumblr not being able to find your Twitter friends or Facebook not letting Instagram photos show up on Twitter because of giant companies pursuing their agendas instead of collaborating in a way that would serve users. And we get a generation of entrepreneurs encouraged to make more narrow-minded, web-hostile products like these because it continues to make a small number of wealthy people even more wealthy, instead of letting lots of people build innovative new opportunities for themselves on top of the web itself.’”

Source: The Web We Lost

Ask Slashdot: Facebook, Twitter For Business, Is It Worth the Privacy Trade-Off?

December 13th, 2012 12:28 admin View Comments

Businesses

cayenne8 writes “I’ve been a staunch advocate of NOT joining Facebook or Twitter or the other social networks to protect my privacy and to not voluntarily give all my personal information away to corporate America, or even the Government. However, I’m beginning to look into making money through various means on the side, one of them being photography/videography. With these mediums, being seen is critically important. Having a business facing site on Facebook/Google+ and even using Twitter can be great for self promotion, and can open up your business to a huge audience. If you were to open your FB and other social network accounts with business ONLY information, and keep your personal information (name, image, etc) off the Facebook account…will this keep your personal privacy still from them, or are their algorithms good enough to piece together who you are from the business only sites? Is the payoff worth the potential trade-off for generating potential customers for your business and guiding them to your primary website?”

Source: Ask Slashdot: Facebook, Twitter For Business, Is It Worth the Privacy Trade-Off?

Legislators Call On Twitter To Ban Hamas

November 25th, 2012 11:28 admin View Comments

Twitter

An anonymous reader sends this excerpt from The Hill: “The past week’s violence in Gaza has rekindled calls for Twitter to shutter the accounts of U.S.-labeled terror groups such as Hamas. Seven House Republicans asked the FBI in September to demand that Twitter take down the accounts of U.S.-designated terrorist groups, such as Hamas, Hezbollah and Somalia’s al Shabaab. The letter to FBI Director Robert Mueller was spearheaded by Rep. Ted Poe (R-Texas), who said Wednesday that the recent events vindicated the request. ‘Allowing foreign terrorist organizations like Hamas to operate on Twitter is enabling the enemy,’ [Poe said] ‘Failure to block access arms them with the ability to freely spread their violent propaganda and mobilize in their War on Israel.’”

Source: Legislators Call On Twitter To Ban Hamas

Cisco To Buy Meraki For $1.2 Billion

November 19th, 2012 11:30 admin View Comments

Cloud

UnanimousCoward writes “Several outlets are reporting Cisco’s intent to acquire Meraki for $1.2 billion. From the article: ‘Cisco Systems of San Jose, California, says it is buying Meraki Networks of San Francisco for around $1.2 billion in cash. The news of the deal leaked on Twitter, when Cisco accidentally posted the news on its blog and swiftly removed it, but it was too late. Cisco is hoping to focus on smaller and medium-sized campuses with Meraki and its products.’”

Source: Cisco To Buy Meraki For $1.2 Billion

Cisco To Buy Meraki For $1.2 Billion

November 19th, 2012 11:30 admin View Comments

Cloud

UnanimousCoward writes “Several outlets are reporting Cisco’s intent to acquire Meraki for $1.2 billion. From the article: ‘Cisco Systems of San Jose, California, says it is buying Meraki Networks of San Francisco for around $1.2 billion in cash. The news of the deal leaked on Twitter, when Cisco accidentally posted the news on its blog and swiftly removed it, but it was too late. Cisco is hoping to focus on smaller and medium-sized campuses with Meraki and its products.’”

Source: Cisco To Buy Meraki For $1.2 Billion

App Auto-Tweets False Piracy Accusations

November 13th, 2012 11:24 admin View Comments

Piracy

An anonymous reader writes “Certain iPhone and iPad applications from a Japanese company have broken software piracy detection mechanisms that are sending out tweets on the user’s own Twitter account, saying, ‘How about we all stop using pirated iOS apps? I promise to stop. I really will. #softwarepirateconfession.’ The trouble is, it’s sending these out on accounts of users who actually paid up to $50 or more for the software and who are legally using it. The app is asking for access to users’ Twitter accounts, but does not give the reason why it is asking, so the author of the article concluded (rightly) that things were being done deliberately. Would you want your legally purchased software to send out messages to all of your contacts on Twitter or on other social networks saying that you were a software pirate? Would you excuse the writers of the software if it was just an error in their piracy detection measures?”

Source: App Auto-Tweets False Piracy Accusations

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