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Posts Tagged ‘tech’

Ask Slashdot: Advice For Getting Tech Career Back On Track

January 6th, 2013 01:27 admin View Comments

Businesses

First time accepted submitter msamp writes “After the dotcom bubble burst so long ago,when tech jobs were so scarce, I went back to school and finished my PhD in Physics. They lied — there really is no shortage of scientists. Before the downturn I was a product manager for home networking equipment. Since getting the degree I have been program/project manager for small DoD and NASA instrumentation programs. I desperately want back into network equipment product management, but my networking tech skills aren’t up to date. I find networking technology absolutely trivial and have been retraining on my own, but hiring managers see the gap and the PhD and run screaming. I’m more than willing to start over in network admin but can’t even get considered for that. Suggestions?”

Source: Ask Slashdot: Advice For Getting Tech Career Back On Track

Best Tech Colleges Are Harder Than Ever To Get In

January 3rd, 2013 01:01 admin View Comments

Education

alphadogg writes “Results from the early application rounds at the nation’s best technical colleges indicate that it will be another excruciatingly difficult year for high school seniors to get accepted into top-notch undergraduate computer science and engineering programs. Leading tech colleges reported a sharp rise in early applications, prompting them to be more selective in choosing prospective freshmen for the Class of 2017. Many colleges are reporting lower acceptance rates for their binding early decision and non-binding early action admissions programs than in previous years. Here’s a roundup of stats from MIT, Stanford and others.”

Source: Best Tech Colleges Are Harder Than Ever To Get In

The L.A. Times Names Its Favorite Flops of the Year

December 29th, 2012 12:01 admin View Comments

Technology

SternisheFan writes “Salvador Rodriguez and Deborah Netburn of The Los Angeles Times have a rundown of the top 10 tech gaffes of 2012. From their article: ‘As 2012 comes to a close we take a look back at the biggest “oops” moments of the last year. Whether it was an advertising misstep (Facebook’s “Chair” commercial), or a product released before it was ready (Apple Maps), or just an idea that was ill-received (homeless men as Wi-Fi hotspots), we tried to compose a list of the times when the major players lost control of the narrative. It’s also a reminder that everyone makes mistakes–even exacting tech companies.’”

Source: The L.A. Times Names Its Favorite Flops of the Year

The Twelve Days of Christmas Gadgets

December 24th, 2012 12:13 admin View Comments

Toys

Hugh Pickens writes writes “If you still have some last minute Christmas shopping to do and are looking for cool gifts for the tech nuts in your life David Pogue has put together a list of twelve cheap tech gifts and gadgets that real-world people can give to real-world friends, bosses, employees and family members — nothing over $100. How about a Zapped edition of Monopoly for $25 where there is no paper money in the game. You put your iPhone or iPad in the middle of the Monopoly board — and each player gets a fake credit card. You pay or collect money from the bank electronically, just by placing your card briefly on the touch screen. Or how about a Sound Oasis Sound Therapy Pillow for $38? The speakers are in the pillow, you don’t feel them, and you can drift to sleep with music playing without disturbing whoever is trying to sleep next to you. Then there’s the Tagg Pet Tracker ($100, plus $8 a month after three months) that snaps onto your dog or cat’s existing collar. You can use the pettracker.com Web site to find your pet on a map, using your phone or computer. Our favorite is the Cirago iAlert Tag for $50. If you walk away from your smartphone (iPhone, Android phone or BlackBerry), your key chain beeps to alert you and it works the other way, too. If you leave your keys somewhere, the phone beeps to alert you as you walk away! But the weirdest and most memorable of the suggestions are the Necomimi Brain-Powered Cat Ears for $100. It’s a headband with fluffy white cat ears attached that perk up, flop down and otherwise turn, cutely and catlike, in sync with your brainwaves. There’s a good deal of debate online about just how much the ears’ motion is, in fact, governed by your brainwaves but one thing the Necomimis do extremely well is get attention, start conversations and make your holiday gift memorable. Now go start wrapping.”

Source: The Twelve Days of Christmas Gadgets

Wozniak’s Predictions For 2013: the Data Center, Mobility and Beyond

December 17th, 2012 12:38 admin View Comments

Cloud

Nerval’s Lobster writes “Tech icon Steve Wozniak has come forward with several predictions for 2013, with data center technologies an important part of the list. Wozniak’s predictions are based on a series of conversations he had recently with Brett Shockley, senior vice president and general manager of applications and emerging technologies at Avaya. They trace an arc from the consumer space up through the enterprise, with an interesting take on the BYOD phenomenon: Woz believes that mobile devices will eventually become the ‘remote controls,’ so to speak, of the world. Although he’s most famous as the co-founder of Apple, Wozniak currently serves as chief scientist at Fusion-io, a manufacturer of enterprise flash storage for data centers and other devices.”

Source: Wozniak’s Predictions For 2013: the Data Center, Mobility and Beyond

Ask Slashdot: Setting Up a Summer Camp Tech Center?

December 15th, 2012 12:20 admin View Comments

Education

First time accepted submitter michaelknauf writes “I’m running a large summer camp that’s primarily concerned with performing arts: music, dance, circus, magic, theater, art, and I want to add some more tech into the program. We already do some iOS game design with Stencyl. We also have an extensive model railroad and remote control car program and a pretty big computer lab (about 100 Apple machines). Our program provides all materials as part of tuition, so I’ve stayed away from robotics as a matter of cost, but I’d love to buy a 3D printer and do classes with that and the Arduino is cheap enough to make some small electronics projects sensible… where do I find the sort of people who could teach such a program as a summer gig? What projects make sense without spending too much cash on a per project basis but would be cool fun for kids and would teach them?”

Source: Ask Slashdot: Setting Up a Summer Camp Tech Center?

Automation Is Making Unions Irrelevant

December 14th, 2012 12:54 admin View Comments

The Almighty Buck

dcblogs writes “Michigan lawmakers just approved a right-to-work law in an effort to dismantle union power, but unions are already becoming irrelevant. The problem with unions is they can’t protect jobs. They can’t stop a company from moving jobs overseas, closing offices, or replacing workers with machines. Indeed, improvements in automation is making the nation attractive again for manufacturing, according to U.S. intelligence Global Trends 2030 report. The trends are clear. Amazon spent $775 million this year to acquire a company, Kiva Systems that makes robots used in warehouses. Automation will replace warehouse workers, assembly-line and even retail workers. In time, Google’s driverless cars will replace drivers in the trucking industry. Unions sometimes get blamed for creating uncompetitive environments and pushing jobs overseas. But the tech industry, which isn’t unionized, is a counterpoint. Tech has been steadily moving jobs overseas to lower costs.”

Source: Automation Is Making Unions Irrelevant

Live Interview: Luke Leighton of Rhombus Tech

December 11th, 2012 12:26 admin View Comments

Hardware Hacking

Today we’re doing a live interview from 18:30 GMT until 20:30 GMT with long time contributor Luke Leighton of Rhombus Tech. An advocate of Free Software, he’s been round the loop that many are now also exploring: looking for mass-volume Factories in China and ARM processor manufacturers that are truly friendly toward Free Software (clue: there aren’t any). He’s currently working on the first card for the EOMA-68 modular computer card specification based around the Allwinner A10, helping the KDE Plasma Active Team with their upcoming Vivaldi Tablet, and even working to build devices around a new embedded processor with the goal of gaining the FSF’s Hardware Endorsement. Ask him anything. (It’s no secret that he’s a Slashdot reader, so expect answers from lkcl.)

Source: Live Interview: Luke Leighton of Rhombus Tech

If Tech Is So Important, Why Are IT Wages Flat?

December 5th, 2012 12:50 admin View Comments

The Almighty Buck

dcblogs writes “Despite the fact that technology plays an increasingly important role in the economy, IT wages remain persistently flat. This may be tech’s inconvenient truth. In 2000, the average hourly wage was $37.27 in computer and math occupations for workers with at least a bachelor’s degree. In 2011, it was $39.24, adjusted for inflation, according to a new report by the Economic Policy Institute. That translates to an average wage increase of less than a half percent a year. In real terms, IT wages overall have gone up by $1.97 an hour in just over 10 years, according to the EPI. Data from professional staffing firm Yoh shows wages in decline. In its latest measure for week 12 of 2012, the hourly wages were $31.45 and in 2010, for the same week, at $31.78. The worker who earned $31.78 in 2010 would need to make $33.71 today to stay even with inflation. Wages vary by skill and this data is broad. The unemployment rate for tech has been in the 3-4% range, but EPI says full employment has been historically around 2%.”

Source: If Tech Is So Important, Why Are IT Wages Flat?

The Foldable Readius Ereader Is Dead

December 2nd, 2012 12:58 admin View Comments

Books

Nate the greatest writes “One of the stranger ereader/smartphone hybrid devices ever to grace the pages of a tech blog is now officially never dead. Polymer Vision, creator of the Readius ereader, has been shut down by its parent company. This company launched in 2004 with the goal of bring an ereader with a foldable 5″ E-ink screen to market. They shipped an initial production run of about 100 thousand units before going bankrupt in 2009. Wistron bought the company out of receivership and has been paying to develop the screen tech. PV has made a number of prototypes over the past few years, but they never made it out of the lab. The closest we came to ever seeing one was a render of a smartphone design which could expand to the size of a tablet.”

Source: The Foldable Readius Ereader Is Dead

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