Archive

Posts Tagged ‘target’

Elite Looks Set To Make a Comeback

January 3rd, 2013 01:49 admin View Comments

Games

realxmp writes “After many years in the wilderness, the BBC is reporting that the next sequel to Elite is in the works. After a long Kickstarter campaign, which squeaked through to its target in the last two days, the project was funded and soon many old gamers will be able to relive the joys of exploring the galaxy in what was one of the earliest space trading games.”

Source: Elite Looks Set To Make a Comeback

Most Kickstarter Projects Fail To Deliver On Time

December 19th, 2012 12:56 admin View Comments

Businesses

adeelarshad82 writes “A recently conducted analysis found that out of the top 50 most-funded Kickstarter projects, a whopping 84 percent missed their target delivery dates. As it turns out, only eight of them hit their deadline. Sixteen hadn’t even shipped yet, while the remaining 26 projects left the warehouse months late. ‘Why are so many crowdfunded projects blowing their deadlines? Over and over in our interviews, the same pattern emerged. A team of ambitious but inexperienced creators launched a project that they expected would attract a few hundred backers. It took off, raising vastly more money than they anticipated — and obliterating the original production plans and timeline.’”

Source: Most Kickstarter Projects Fail To Deliver On Time

W3C Finalizes the Definition of HTML5

December 17th, 2012 12:25 admin View Comments

Programming

hypnosec writes “The Worldwide Web Consortium (W3C) has announced that it has finalized the definition of HTML5 and that it is ready for interoperability testing. HTML5 hasn’t been given the status of standard yet but it is feature complete now, giving developers a stable target to develop their web applications. The W3C said in the announcement ‘HTML5 is the cornerstone of the Open Web Platform” and that it provides an environment which can utilize all of a device’s capabilities like videos, animations, graphics and typography. The HTML5 specifications still have a long way to go before they hit the Recommendation status. HTML5 will have to go through a round of testing that looks specifically into interoperability and performance after which time it will be given a Candidate Recommendation title.”

Source: W3C Finalizes the Definition of HTML5

Book Review: Reverse Deception

November 12th, 2012 11:19 admin View Comments

Books

benrothke writes “Advanced persistent threat (APT) is one of the most common information security terms used today and it is an undeniably real and dangerous menace. Wikipedia notes that APT’s usually refer to a group, such as a foreign government, with both the capability and the intent to persistently and effectively target a specific entity. The term is commonly used to refer to cyber threats, in particular that of Internet-enabled espionage using a variety of intelligence gathering techniques to access sensitive information, but applies equally to other threats such as that of traditional espionage or attack. Every organization of size and scope is a target, and many of the world’s largest firms and governments have been victims. In Reverse Deception: Organized Cyber Threat Counter-Exploitation, Dr. Max Kilger and his co-authors provide an effective counterintelligence approach in which to deal with APT. The good news is that the authors provide an effective framework. The bad news is that creating an effective defense is not an easy undertaking.” Keep reading below for the rest of Ben’s review.

Reverse Deception: Organized Cyber Threat Counter-Exploitation
author Sean Bodmer, Dr. Max Kilger , Gregory Carpenter , Jade Jones
pages 464
publisher McGraw-Hill Osborne Media
rating 9/10
reviewer Ben Rothke
ISBN 978-0071772495
summary Excellent reference in which to deal with advanced persistent threats

Source: Book Review: Reverse Deception

Book Review: Reverse Deception

November 12th, 2012 11:19 admin View Comments

Books

benrothke writes “Advanced persistent threat (APT) is one of the most common information security terms used today and it is an undeniably real and dangerous menace. Wikipedia notes that APT’s usually refer to a group, such as a foreign government, with both the capability and the intent to persistently and effectively target a specific entity. The term is commonly used to refer to cyber threats, in particular that of Internet-enabled espionage using a variety of intelligence gathering techniques to access sensitive information, but applies equally to other threats such as that of traditional espionage or attack. Every organization of size and scope is a target, and many of the world’s largest firms and governments have been victims. In Reverse Deception: Organized Cyber Threat Counter-Exploitation, Dr. Max Kilger and his co-authors provide an effective counterintelligence approach in which to deal with APT. The good news is that the authors provide an effective framework. The bad news is that creating an effective defense is not an easy undertaking.” Keep reading below for the rest of Ben’s review.

Reverse Deception: Organized Cyber Threat Counter-Exploitation
author Sean Bodmer, Dr. Max Kilger , Gregory Carpenter , Jade Jones
pages 464
publisher McGraw-Hill Osborne Media
rating 9/10
reviewer Ben Rothke
ISBN 978-0071772495
summary Excellent reference in which to deal with advanced persistent threats

Source: Book Review: Reverse Deception

Boeing’s CHAMP Missile Uses Radio Waves To Remotely Disable PCs

October 24th, 2012 10:11 admin View Comments

The Military

Dupple writes “During last week’s test, a CHAMP (Counter-electronics High-powered Microwave Advanced Missile Project) missile successfully disabled its target by firing high power microwaves into a building filled with computers and other electronics. ‘On Oct. 16th at 10:32 a.m. MST a Boeing Phantom Works team along with members from the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Directed Energy Directorate team, and Raytheon Ktech, suppliers of the High Power Microwave source, huddled in a conference room at Hill Air Force Base and watched the history making test unfold on a television monitor. CHAMP approached its first target and fired a burst of High Power Microwaves at a two story building built on the test range. Inside rows of personal computers and electrical systems were turned on to gauge the effects of the powerful radio waves. Seconds later the PC monitors went dark and cheers erupted in the conference room. CHAMP had successfully knocked out the computer and electrical systems in the target building. Even the television cameras set up to record the test were knocked off line without collateral damage.’”

Source: Boeing’s CHAMP Missile Uses Radio Waves To Remotely Disable PCs

Adventures In Rooting: Running Jelly Bean On Last Year’s Kindle Fire

October 8th, 2012 10:15 admin View Comments

Android

concealment writes “Luckily, the Fire’s low price and popularity relative to other Android tablets has made it a common target for Android’s bustling open-source community, which has automated most of the sometimes-messy process of rooting and flashing your tablet. The Kindle Fire Utility boils the whole rooting process down to a couple of steps, and from there it’s pretty easy to find pretty-stable Jelly Bean ROMs. A CyanogenMod-based version is actively maintained, but I prefer the older Hashcode ROM, which is very similar to the interface on the Nexus 7.”

Source: Adventures In Rooting: Running Jelly Bean On Last Year’s Kindle Fire

Philippines’ Cybercrime Law Makes SOPA Look Reasonable

October 4th, 2012 10:04 admin View Comments

Censorship

silentbrad writes with this report from Forbes: “The dark days of SOPA and PIPA are behind the U.S., at least temporarily, as copyright tycoons reground and restrategize, attempting to come up with measures that don’t cause the entire internet to shut down in protest. But one country has already moved ahead with similar legislation. The government of the Philippines has passed the Cybercrime Prevention Act, which on the surface, as usual, sounds perfectly well-intentioned. But when you read the actual contents of what’s been deemed ‘cybercrime,’ SOPA’s proposed censorship sounds downright lax by comparison. Yes, there’s the usual hacking, cracking, identity theft and spamming, which most of us can agree should be illegal. But there’s also cybersex, pornography, file-sharing (SOPA’s main target), and the most controversial provision, online libel.” At least it doesn’t mention blasphemy.

Source: Philippines’ Cybercrime Law Makes SOPA Look Reasonable

DARPA Creates 0.85 THz Solid State Receiver

August 5th, 2012 08:30 admin View Comments

Science

hypnosec writes “DARPA, under its THz Electronics program, has designed a solid state receiver capable of THz (terahertz) frequencies thus inching towards the possibilities of transistor-based electronics that will operate at THz frequencies. The newly designed solid state receiver demonstrates a gain of 0.85 THz. This particular milestone is a stepping stone for the next target of 1.03 THz. Because of this achievement a host of DoD electronics capabilities can now be realized. One such application where this can be of use is for a sensor that will operate through clouds under a DARPA program, dubbed, VISAR.”

Source: DARPA Creates 0.85 THz Solid State Receiver

Spooky: How NSA’s Surveillance Algorithms See Into Your Life

July 24th, 2012 07:05 admin View Comments

Privacy

SmartAboutThings writes “A quite scary talk show with former NSA employees — now whistle blowers — Thomas Drake, Kirk Wiebe, and William Binney reveals that the NSA has algorithms that go through data gathered about us and they can basically ‘see into our lives.’ And this seems to be going on especially since the Patriot Act has removed the statutory requirement that the government prove a surveillance target under FISA is a non-U.S. citizen and agent of a foreign power.” Binney’s HOPE keynote has more detail on how the NSA watches people.

Source: Spooky: How NSA’s Surveillance Algorithms See Into Your Life

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