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Posts Tagged ‘space’

Want To Buy a Used Spaceport?

January 6th, 2013 01:32 admin View Comments

Businesses

Hugh Pickens writes writes “Want to buy a 15,000-foot landing strip? How about a place to assemble rocket ships or a parachute-packing plant? Have we got a deal for you. The Orlando Sentinel reports that with the cleanup and wind-down of the shuttle program, NASA is quietly holding a going-out-of-business sale for the its space-shuttle facilities including Launch Pad 39A, where shuttles were launched; space in the Vehicle Assembly Building, the iconic 526-foot-tall structure first used to assemble Saturn V-Apollo rockets; the Orbiter Processing Facilities, essentially huge garages where the shuttles were maintained; Hangar N and its high-tech test equipment; the launch-control center; and various other buildings and chunks of undeveloped property. ‘The facilities out here can’t be in an abandoned state for long before they become unusable,’ says Joyce Riquelme, NASA’s director of KSC planning and development. ‘So we’re in a big push over the next few months to either have agreements for these facilities or not.’ The process is mostly secret, because NASA has agreed to let bidders declare their proposals proprietary, keeping them out of the view of competitors and the public. Frank DiBello, thinks the most attractive facilities are those that can support launches that don’t use the existing pads at KSC and adjacent Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. ‘Anything that still has cleaning capabilities or satellite-processing capabilities, the parachute facility, the tile facility, the OPF, all three of them, they have real value to the next generation of space activity,’ says Frank DiBello, President of Space Florida, an Independent Special District of the State of Florida, created to foster the growth and development of a sustainable and world-leading space industry in Florida. ‘If the infrastructure helps you reach market, then it has value. If it doesn’t, then it’s just a building, it’s just a launchpad, and nobody wants it.’”

Source: Want To Buy a Used Spaceport?

NASA Considers Putting an Asteroid Into Orbit Around the Moon

January 4th, 2013 01:41 admin View Comments

Moon

Zothecula writes “To paraphrase an old saying, if the astronaut can’t go to the asteroid, then the asteroid must come to the astronaut. In a study released by the Keck Institute for Space Studies, researchers outlined a mission (PDF) to tow an asteroid into lunar orbit by 2025 using ion propulsion and a really big bag. The idea is to bring an asteroid close to Earth for easy study and visits by astronauts without the hazards and expense of a deep space mission. Now, Keck researchers say NASA officials are evaluating the plan to see whether it’s something they want to do. The total cost is estimated to be roughly $2.6 billion.”

Source: NASA Considers Putting an Asteroid Into Orbit Around the Moon

Trip To Mars Could Damage Astronauts’ Brains

January 2nd, 2013 01:00 admin View Comments

Mars

Hugh Pickens writes writes “Alex Knapp reports that research by a team at the Rochester Medical Center suggests that exposure to the radiation of outer space could accelerate the onset of Alzheimer’s disease in astronauts. ‘Galactic cosmic radiation poses a significant threat to future astronauts… Exposure to … equivalent to a mission to Mars could produce cognitive problems and speed up changes in the brain that are associated with Alzheimer’s disease’ says M. Kerry O’Banio. Researchers exposed mice with known timeframes for developing Alzheimer’s to the type of low-level radiation that astronauts would be exposed to over time on a long space journey. The mice were then put through tests that measured their memory and cognitive ability and the mice exposed to radiation showed significant cognitive impairment. It’s not going to be an easy problem to solve, either. The radiation the researchers used in their testing is composed of highly charged iron particles, which are relatively common in space. ‘Because iron particles pack a bigger wallop it is extremely difficult from an engineering perspective to effectively shield against them,’ says O’Banion. ‘One would have to essentially wrap a spacecraft in a six-foot block of lead or concrete.’”

Source: Trip To Mars Could Damage Astronauts’ Brains

2013 Will Be a Big Year For Private Spaceflight

January 1st, 2013 01:55 admin View Comments

Space

An article at Space.com forecasts an important year for private space companies in 2013. SpaceX is working on a new version of its Dragon capsule that is quite different from the current model. SpaceX CEO Elon Musk said that the first iteration looked similar to other space capsules because the SpaceX team was learning as they went. Now, they’re drawing on the expertise they’ve gained to tailor the new capsule to their needs. “Musk described Dragon version 2 as having ‘legs that pop out’ and added that it uses parachutes and its eight SuperDraco thrusters for a ‘propulsive landing.’” The capsule will hold up to seven people, and they hope to win a crew transportation contract for getting NASA astronauts up to the ISS. The bidding for that contract starts in the second half of 2013. Commercial space planes are also set to reach new heights in 2013. XCOR Aerospace will be building its Lynx I rocket plane, and a spokesman said, “we’ll be doing test fights throughout the year from early 2013 and then go into commercial flights.” Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo will also undergo its first rocket-powered flight this year.

Source: 2013 Will Be a Big Year For Private Spaceflight

NASA Faces Rough Road In 2013

December 31st, 2012 12:06 admin View Comments

NASA

MarkWhittington writes “With the National Research Council report that concluded that President Obama’s plan for a mission to an asteroid has no support, either inside NASA or anywhere else, the space agency faces a decision point in 2013. The NRC suggested that the administration, Congress, NASA, and other stakeholders in space exploration come to a consensus behind a new goal. But the space agency’s problems run deep, caused by a lack of direction, a lack of leadership, and a lack of funding.”

Source: NASA Faces Rough Road In 2013

Property Rights In Space?

December 19th, 2012 12:13 admin View Comments

Space

ATKeiper writes “A number of companies have announced plans in the last couple of years to undertake private development of space. There are asteroid-mining proposals backed by Larry Page and Eric Schmidt, various moon-mining proposals, and, announced just this month, a proposed moon-tourism venture. But all of these — especially the efforts to mine resources in space — are hampered by the fact that existing treaties, like the Outer Space Treaty, seem to prohibit private ownership of space resources. A new essay in The New Atlantis revisits the debates about property rights in space and examines a proposal that could resolve the stickiest treaty problems and make it possible to stake claims in space.”

Source: Property Rights In Space?

Video Tour of the International Space Station

December 15th, 2012 12:23 admin View Comments

ISS

SternisheFan writes with an excerpt from Bad Astronomer Phil Plait, writing at Slate: “Before she came back to Earth in a ball of fire surrounding her Russian re-entry capsule, astronaut Sunita Williams took time out of her packing for the trip home to give a nickel tour of the International Space Station. … I know the video’s long, but if you have the time I do suggest watching the whole thing. I have very mixed feelings about the space station; it cost a lot of money, and in my opinion it hasn’t lived up to the scientific potential NASA promised when it was being designed. But watching this video reminded me of the good that’s come out of it: There is science being done there; we’re learning how to design and build hardware for long-term space travel; we’re learning just how to live in space (and NASA just announced it will be sending humans into space for an entire year, an unprecedented experiment); and we’re finding new ways for nations and individuals to cooperate in space.”

Source: Video Tour of the International Space Station

Learning Rocket Science With Video Games

December 12th, 2012 12:50 admin View Comments

Education

GNUman writes “Wired has an article about using videogames to get kids into engineering, starting with Kerbal Space Program, a indie physics-driven sandbox where you build your own spaceship and explore space. I have had much fun with this game the past year and I have actually learned a bit of rocket engineering and orbital mechanics while at it. The article also mentions Minecraft, World of Goo, Amazing Alex, Patterns, Banjo Kazooie: Nuts and Bolts, Fantastic Contraption and SpaceChem. I really like the idea of games that are great fun while fostering creativity and even learning in the process. What games would you add to this list?”

Source: Learning Rocket Science With Video Games

Hubble Sees Tribe of Baby Galaxies 13+ Billion Light Years Away

December 12th, 2012 12:29 admin View Comments

Space

The Bad Astronomer writes “Using Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have spotted seven galaxies that are all over 13 billion light years away… including one that appears to be a record breaker at a staggering 13.3+ billion light years distant. That one is seen as it was only 380 million years after the Big Bang. This observation reaches into the era of the young cosmos when stars were first forming, and allows astronomers to better understand what the Universe was like back then — a time we know very little about.”

Source: Hubble Sees Tribe of Baby Galaxies 13+ Billion Light Years Away

Air Force Sends Mystery Mini-Shuttle Back To Space

December 11th, 2012 12:32 admin View Comments

Space

dsinc sends this quote from an AP report about the U.S. Air Force’s X-37B spaceplane: “The Air Force launched the unmanned spacecraft Tuesday hidden on top of an Atlas V rocket. It’s the second flight for this original X-37B spaceplane. It circled the planet for seven months in 2010. A second X-37B spacecraft spent more than a year in orbit. These high-tech mystery machines — 29 feet long — are about one-quarter the size of NASA’s old space shuttles and can land automatically on a runway. The two previous touchdowns occurred in Southern California; this one might end on NASA’s three-mile-long runway once reserved for the space agency’s shuttles. The military isn’t saying much, if anything, about this new secret mission. In fact, launch commentary ended 17 minutes into the flight. But one scientific observer, Harvard University’s Jonathan McDowell of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, speculates the spaceplane is carrying sensors designed for spying and likely is serving as a testbed for future satellites.”

Source: Air Force Sends Mystery Mini-Shuttle Back To Space

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