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Posts Tagged ‘social networking sites’

UK Gov’t Official Advises Using Fake Details On Social Networks

October 25th, 2012 10:07 admin View Comments

Privacy

another random user writes “A senior government official has sparked anger by advising internet users to give fake details to websites to protect their security. Andy Smith, an internet security chief at the Cabinet Office, said people should only give accurate details to trusted sites such as government ones. He said names and addresses posted on social networking sites ‘can be used against you’ by criminals. … ‘When you put information on the internet do not use your real name, your real date of birth,’ he told a Parliament and the Internet Conference in Portcullis House, Westminster. ‘When you are putting information on social networking sites don’t put real combinations of information, because it can be used against you.’ But he stressed that internet users should always give accurate information when they were filling in government forms on the internet, such a tax returns.”

Source: UK Gov’t Official Advises Using Fake Details On Social Networks

Spokeo Fined $800K By FTC For Marketing Its Services To Employers

June 12th, 2012 06:48 admin View Comments

Privacy

nonprofiteer writes “Spokeo was one of the first public-facing person-profiling companies to attract the ire of those profiled. Taglined ‘not your grandmother’s phonebook,’ it offers up profiles pulled from public records, social networking sites, etc, including your address, worth of your home, who’s in your family, your estimated wealth, your hobbies and interests, and more. People freaked out when they first discovered it. Apparently, the company was selling reports to employers, but not following principles set forth by the Fair Credit Reporting Act. The Federal Trade Commission is fining them $800,000. FTC also chastises them for writing fake positive reviews around the Web.”

Source: Spokeo Fined $800K By FTC For Marketing Its Services To Employers

Spokeo Fined $800K By FTC For Marketing Its Services To Employers

June 12th, 2012 06:48 admin View Comments

Privacy

nonprofiteer writes “Spokeo was one of the first public-facing person-profiling companies to attract the ire of those profiled. Taglined ‘not your grandmother’s phonebook,’ it offers up profiles pulled from public records, social networking sites, etc, including your address, worth of your home, who’s in your family, your estimated wealth, your hobbies and interests, and more. People freaked out when they first discovered it. Apparently, the company was selling reports to employers, but not following principles set forth by the Fair Credit Reporting Act. The Federal Trade Commission is fining them $800,000. FTC also chastises them for writing fake positive reviews around the Web.”

Source: Spokeo Fined $800K By FTC For Marketing Its Services To Employers

How to Share Your Business Photos Online – Discreetly

May 15th, 2012 05:58 admin View Comments

You have just returned from a corporate retreat or some other business event that was well-documented with several amateur photographers. Now you want to share all of these pictures amongst your co-workers. The challenge is that you want to keep them private to the participants and not plaster them all over the Internets. What to do?

 

Assume that your requirements are to satisfy the ultra-paranoid in the group and also find something that is dirt simple to use. You don’t want to make everyone join a new social network just to see the photos; most of us have too many logins already. That leaves out most of the microblogging sites. And you don’t want to have to worry that someone will click on the wrong button and inadvertently share the entire photo collection with the universe, including the press, competitors and so on.

Facebook, Instagram, Google+ and many other social-networking sites aren’t very good at setting up discrete group-privacy controls, so they are out of the running for our purposes. And while there are dozens of file-sharing sites such as Box.net and Evernote, the idea is to find something that is designed around uploading and sharing images.

With that in mind, we looked at the following five services:

  1. Shutterfly.com
  2. Photobucket.com
  3. Flickr.com (now part of Yahoo)
  4. Zangzing.com
  5. Posterous Spaces (now part of Twitter)

None of these services is perfect, but they fall into two broad categories: those that have better privacy controls and those that are easier to use.

Let’s look at our requirements in more detail:

First, we want a service that can create a private space that doesn’t appear on search engines and can’t be discovered by unauthorized users. Photobucket and Shutterfly both do this, by setting up a special URL (Photobucket.com/groupname or Groupname.shutterfly.com) for your group. In Photobucket, for example, you have three choices for each album’s privacy controls: everyone can see them, no one else can see them, or you can password protect them by invitation only. The latter is perfect for this application, and you can set up an album password so that only those folks who know the password can see and download the photos. (See screenshot below.) Shutterfly has similar options with its Share Sites feature.

The problem with both Photobucket and Shutterfly is that you need to become a member to upload photos: That is fine if you have just a few shutterbugs in your group, but if everyone wants to be able to contribute images, it can become cumbersome.

Flickr offers URLs for groups, such as http://www.flickr.com/groups/groupname. But Yahoo really wants you to sign up to its service, and you will need to do so if you want to post any photos. Flickr has a guest pass option, but it is designed to work with individual photos. And Flickr users have to make sure to set up its autoposting/notification features to keep your photos from showing up in your Facebook Timeline or other places.

Zangzing (which we have written about previously) is easier to use but that comes at a privacy cost. You can set up individual albums that have their own URLs, such as http://www.zangzing.com/username/albumname. But because there is no password required, anyone who knows the URL can access the entire album. And you must join the service in order to upload pictures, you will need to join. On the plus side, you can also email pictures to albumname@zangzing.com, and they will be automatically posted to the album.

Finally, Posterous is more of a blogging site than a photo collection, but it can be used for sharing photos, as well. Indeed, if you want to mix your photos with other business content, Posterous could be a good choice and could serve as the base for a simple low-end Web presence. Groups of photos can have their own URLs, but you do need to become a member to post content. You can also email your photos and have them posted to your site, like what Zangzing does.

Recommendations: Start with Zangzing

We recommend you start with Zangzing, especially if you require the simplicity of a shareable URL and don’t want to mess with having each person sign up for the service. If you need the additional security that a membership site offers, then look at Photobucket. It has more granularity for the security options than Shutterfly. Steer clear of Flickr: Its interface is somewhat long in the tooth, and it is too easy to click on the wrong button and end up sharing your entire photo collection to Facebook or Twitter. If you have more confidence in your users’ abilities, you can set up private groups in Facebook or Google+.

Source: How to Share Your Business Photos Online – Discreetly

Pirate Bay, IsoHunt Blocked In India

May 5th, 2012 05:02 admin View Comments

Censorship

First time accepted submitter unmole writes “It seems that India’s Department of Telecom has instructed ISP’s to block popular torrent trackers like the Pirate Bay and IsoHunt. Visitors now see a page (Screenshot) informing that ‘This site has been blocked as per instructions from Department of Telecom (DOT),’ with no additional details. The Department of Telecom has not made any public announcement to this effect. This comes months after an Indian court gave the green signal for prosecuting social networking sites.”

Source: Pirate Bay, IsoHunt Blocked In India

NYC Teachers Forbidden To “Friend” Students

May 2nd, 2012 05:01 admin View Comments

Social Networks

betterunixthanunix writes “The New York City Department of Education has issued rules covering student-teacher interactions on social networking websites. Following numerous inappropriate relationships between students and teachers that began on social networking sites, the rules prohibit teachers from communicating with students using their ‘personal’ accounts, and requires parental consent before students can participate in social networking for educational purposes. The rules also state that teachers have no expectation of privacy online, and that principals and other officials will inspect teachers’ profiles. Oddly, the rules do not address communication involving cell phones, which the Department of Education’s own investigations have shown to be even more problematic.”

Source: NYC Teachers Forbidden To “Friend” Students

Heavyweights Clash Over Policing Repeat Copyright Infringers

April 9th, 2012 04:14 admin View Comments

The Courts

SolKeshNaranek tips a story at TorrentFreak about an ongoing copyright case that revolves around how much effort websites need to expend to block repeat infringers after responding to DMCA requests. In 2011, a judge ruled that a website embedding videos from third parties had correctly removed links to infringing videos after receiving a DMCA request, but failed to do anything to police users who had created these links multiple times. For this, the judge said, the website would be required to adopt a number of measures to prevent repeat infringement. Google and Facebook wrote an amicus brief opposing the ruling, as did Public Knowledge and the EFF. Now the MPAA has, unsurprisingly, come out in favor. They wrote, “Contrary to the assertions of myVidster and amici Google and Facebook, search engines and social networking sites are not the only businesses that desire certainty in a challenging online marketplace. MPAA member companies and other producers of creative works also need a predictable legal landscape in which to operate. … Given the massive and often anonymous infringement on the internet, the ability of copyright holders to hold gateways like myVidster liable for secondary infringement is crucial in preventing piracy.”

Source: Heavyweights Clash Over Policing Repeat Copyright Infringers

Match.com Founder, Former Executives Launch Pinterest-Like Dating Site

March 8th, 2012 03:15 admin View Comments

TCMSquare-Blue-Big.pngFormer executives a co-founder of Match.com are launching a new dating Website next week that combines elements of Pinterest and other social networking sites.

Among the features the group is implementing in the theComplete.me is the ability for users to quickly create dating profiles by accessing information from their existing Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Google+ profiles. The site will also undercut competitors like Match.com and eHarmony by allowing users to communicate for free.

Instead of charging for users for subscriptions, the site will instead charge users for premium placement in search results, or to sponsor a category so they’ll appear higher in search results to users with similar interests. A spokeswoman also said the company plans to ad video services and would offer users unlimited video services if they were willing to pay a premium over the free service.

The site is the brainchild of former Match.com vice president Brian Bowman and Shashikant Joshi, former founder and former CTO of Perfode. Trish McDermott, former VP Public Relations Match.com and Match.com co-founder Fran Maier are also part of the startup.

Perhaps the biggest change from traditional dating sites, according to company marketing materials, is that by utilizing social networking profiles, theComplete.me removes the layers of anonymity. The company is banking on the notion that people are over the stigma of online dating and will want dating sites “which often leads to inappropriate behavior.”

Our best guess at the inappropriate behavior is married people posing as single people.

Online dating revenue fell during the recession but rebounded last year, rising 1% to $1.9 billion. Approximately 1,500 dating sites serve the U.S. market, with analysts projecting industry-wide revenue of $2.1 billion this year.

theComplete.me, according to a press release, is trying to stand out in the crowded field by using data users submit to other social networks to better match users.

“While anyone can check a box on a dating site that says they have a great sense of humor, it doesn’t mean that other singles will find them funny,” McDermott said. “With interest matching, singles can connect with someone who enjoys ‘nice’ funny like Ellen DeGeneres, ‘ice’ funny like Ann Coulter, ‘class-clown’ funny like Jim Belushi, or ‘edgy’ funny like Chris Rock.”

McDermott said theComplete.me gives members “Pinterest-like control over profile personalization with images and videos framed from around the Web,” while also giving the increased privacy controls. The site is alsso designed to let members browse profiles and communicate with members of other dating sites being used by people in the Me Networ, including Match.com, Zoosk, eHarmony and Badoo.

FraMEs.jpg

Source: Match.com Founder, Former Executives Launch Pinterest-Like Dating Site

The Worst Job In the Digital World

March 6th, 2012 03:14 admin View Comments

Facebook

Hugh Pickens writes “The Telegraph reports on one of the worst jobs in the digital world — moderating photos and posts on Facebook and other social networking sites flagged as unsuitable by other users. Last year Amine Derkaoui, a 21-year-old Moroccan man, spent a few weeks training to screen illicit Facebook content through an outsourcing firm, for which he was paid $1 an hour. ‘It must be the worst salary paid by Facebook,’ says Derkaoui. ‘And the job itself was very upsetting – no one likes to see a human cut into pieces every day.’ Other moderators, mainly young, well-educated people working in Asia, Africa and Central America, have similar stories. ‘Paedophilia, necrophilia, beheadings, suicides, etc,’ says one. ‘I left [because] I value my sanity.’ Facebook’s one-page cheat sheet lays out exactly what must be confirmed and deleted by the team. Pictures of naked private parts, drugs (apart from marijuana) and sexual activity (apart from foreplay) are all banned. Once something is reported by a user, the moderator sitting at his computer in Morocco or Mexico has three options: delete it; ignore it; or escalate it, which refers it back to a Facebook employee in California who will, if necessary, report it to the authorities. Emma Barnett adds that although this invisible army of moderators receive basic training, they work from home, do not appear to undergo criminal checks, and have worrying access to users’ personal details. ‘Maybe disgruntled commuters, old schoolfriends and new mothers will think twice before sharing intimate information with their “friends” – only to find that two minutes later it’s being viewed by an under-vetted, unfulfilled person on a dollar an hour in an internet café in Marrakech.’”

Source: The Worst Job In the Digital World

Canadian Music Industry Wants Subscriber Disclosure Without Court Oversight

March 5th, 2012 03:06 admin View Comments

Canada

An anonymous reader writes “The incredible demands of the Canadian music industry as it seeks a massive overhaul of Canadian copyright law continues. It is seeking increased liability for social networking sites, search engines, blogging platforms, video sites, and many other websites featuring third party contributions, plus a new iPod tax, and an extension in the term of copyright. Last week, it went further, demanding a requirement for Internet providers to disclose customer name and address information to copyright owners without court oversight as well as takedowns with no due process and unlimited statutory damages.”

Source: Canadian Music Industry Wants Subscriber Disclosure Without Court Oversight

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