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Posts Tagged ‘snydeq’

The Trouble With Bringing Your Business Laptop To China

December 4th, 2012 12:37 admin View Comments

China

snydeq writes “A growing trend faces business executives traveling to China: government or industry spooks stealing data from their laptops and installing spyware. ‘While you were out to dinner that first night, someone entered your room (often a nominal hotel staffer), carefully examined the contents of your laptop, and installed spyware on the computer — without your having a clue. The result? Exposure of information, including customer data, product development documentation, countless emails, and other proprietary information of value to competitors and foreign governments. Perhaps even, thanks to the spyware, there’s an ongoing infection in your corporate network that continually phones home key secrets for months or years afterward.’”

Source: The Trouble With Bringing Your Business Laptop To China

System Admins Should Know How To Code

October 22nd, 2012 10:29 admin View Comments

Programming

snydeq writes “You don’t need to be a programmer, but you’ll solve harder problems faster if you can write your own code, writes Paul Venezia. ‘The fact is, while we may know several programming languages to varying degrees, most IT ninjas aren’t developers, per se. I’ve put in weeks and months of work on various large coding projects, but that’s certainly not how I spend most of my time. Frankly, I don’t think I could just write code day in and day out, but when I need to develop a tool to deal with a random problem, I dive right in. … It’s not a vocation, and it’s not a clear focus of the job, but it’s a substantial weapon when tackling many problems. I’m fairly certain that if all I did was write Perl, I’d go insane.’”

Source: System Admins Should Know How To Code

The Truth About Hiring “Rock Star” Developers

August 31st, 2012 08:30 admin View Comments

Businesses

snydeq writes “You want the best and the brightest money can buy. Or do you? Andrew Oliver offers six hard truths about ‘rock-star’ developers, arguing in favor of mixed skill levels with a focus on getting the job done: ‘A big, important project has launched — and abruptly crashed to the ground. The horrible spaghetti code is beyond debugging. There are no unit tests, and every change requires a meeting with, like, 40 people. Oh, if only we’d had a team of 10 “rock star” developers working on this project instead! It would have been done in half the time with twice the features and five-nines availability. On the other hand, maybe not. A team of senior developers will often produce a complex design and no code, thanks to the reasons listed below.’”

Source: The Truth About Hiring “Rock Star” Developers

Windows 7 Is the Next Windows XP

August 22nd, 2012 08:31 admin View Comments

Microsoft

snydeq writes “Windows XP’s most beloved factors are also driving business organizations to Windows 7 in the face of Windows 8. ‘We love Windows 7: That’s the message loud and clear from people this week at the TechMentor Conference held at Microsoft headquarters in Redmond, Wash. With Windows XP reaching end of life for support in April 2014, the plan for most organizations is to upgrade — to Windows 7,’ indicating ‘a repeat of history for what we’ve seen with Windows releases, the original-cast Star Trek movie pattern where every other version was beloved and the ones in between decidedly not so.’”

Source: Windows 7 Is the Next Windows XP

Patent and Copyright Wars Gone Wild

August 2nd, 2012 08:12 admin View Comments

The Courts

snydeq writes “While Apple and Samsung fight over patents and prototypes, other copyright trolls are waging an X-rated battle on innocent users, as lawyers representing some adult movie companies are sending letters accusing users of illegally downloading their movies and saying that, for a price, they can make the charges go away. ‘Cases like this, usually involving pornographic content, are very common,’ Mitch Stoltz, a staff attorney for the Electronic Frontier Foundation said. At least 250,000 individuals have been named in group lawsuits over the last few years. There’s a very common belief that if someone pirates your Wi-Fi connection or uses your computer without your permission, you are responsible for illegal downloads of copyrighted material. That’s not true, says Stoltz; the law is quite clear. However, the lawyers who bring those cases use that misperception to convince innocent people that they had better pay up. Since $3,500 is just a fraction of the money it would take to fight a case in court, most people simply settle.”

Source: Patent and Copyright Wars Gone Wild

Great Open Source Map Tools For Web Developers

July 20th, 2012 07:46 admin View Comments

Open Source

snydeq writes “InfoWorld’s Peter Wayner surveys the rich ecosystem of free maps, free data, and free libraries that give developers excellent alternatives to Google Maps. ‘The options are expanding quickly as companies are building their own databases for holding geographical data, their own rendering tools for building maps, and their own software for embedding the maps in websites. … Working with these tools can be a bit more complex than working with a big provider like Google. Some of these companies make JavaScript tools for displaying the maps, and others just deliver the raw tiles that the browsers use to assemble the maps. Working with the code means making decisions about how you want to assemble the pieces — now within your control. You can stick with one simple library or combine someone else’s library with tiles you produce yourself.’”

Source: Great Open Source Map Tools For Web Developers

First Look: Microsoft Office 2013

July 16th, 2012 07:54 admin View Comments

Microsoft

snydeq writes “Ever since the first beta editions of Windows 8 appeared, rumors have circulated over how Microsoft would revamp its other flagship consumer product, Office, to be all the more useful in the new OS. Would Office become touch-oriented and Metro-centric, to the exclusion of plain old Windows users? A first look at Office 2013 provides the short answer: No. ‘Office 2013 has clearly been revised to work that much better in Windows 8 and on touch-centric devices, but the vast majority of its functionality remains in place. The changes made are mostly cosmetic — a way to bring the Metro look to Office for users of versions of Windows other than 8. Further, Office 2013 has been designed to integrate more closely with online storage and services (mainly Microsoft’s), although those are thankfully optional and not mandatory.’”

Source: First Look: Microsoft Office 2013

The Long Death of Fat Clients

June 28th, 2012 06:09 admin View Comments

Programming

snydeq writes “With Adobe’s divestment of Flex and mobile Flash and Microsoft’s move from Silverlight to Metro, Oracle now seems all alone in believing that a fat client framework — in the form of JavaFX — is a worthwhile investment, writes Andrew Oliver. ‘Fewer and fewer options exist for developing purely fat client desktop applications and fewer still for RAD applications with Web-based delivery (aka, “thick clients”). We are on the verge of a purely HTML/JavaScript client world. Or we would be, if it weren’t for mobile pushing us back to client-side development.’”

Source: The Long Death of Fat Clients

Free Speech For Computers?

June 21st, 2012 06:05 admin View Comments

The Courts

snydeq writes “Law professor Tim Wu sheds light on a growing legal concern: the extent to which computers have a constitutional right to free speech. ‘This may sound like a fanciful question, a matter of philosophy or science fiction. But it’s become a real issue with important consequences,’ Wu writes. First it was Google defending — and winning — a civil suit on grounds that search results are constitutionally protected speech. Now it is doubling down on the argument amidst greater federal scrutiny. ‘Consider that Google has attracted attention from both antitrust and consumer protection officials after accusations that it has used its dominance in search to hinder competitors and in some instances has not made clear the line between advertisement and results. Consider that the “decisions” made by Facebook’s computers may involve widely sharing your private information. … Ordinarily, such practices could violate laws meant to protect consumers. But if we call computerized decisions “speech,” the judiciary must consider these laws as potential censorship, making the First Amendment, for these companies, a formidable anti-regulatory tool.’”

Source: Free Speech For Computers?

Banking On Your Personal Online Data

June 16th, 2012 06:09 admin View Comments

Facebook

snydeq writes “While privacy groups are working to lock away your personal data, a better — or perhaps supplementary — option may be to let you sell it for what it’s really worth. ‘Whether it’s Facebook, Twitter, Google Drive, or Pinterest, the truth is the product is you — all that data about you used to target ads and sales pitches. It’s hardly a new business model — it’s how trade publications have made their money for decades — but in the online world all that information is easily stolen, traded, and spread. … If the data has value — and we know it does — its creators (you and me) should be paid for it. And if we take over the selling of our data, all those companies using it now have to respect us and abide by our standards.’”

Source: Banking On Your Personal Online Data

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