Archive

Posts Tagged ‘security’

NVIDIA Releases Fix For Dangerous Display Driver Exploit

January 5th, 2013 01:46 admin View Comments

Security

wiredmikey writes “NVIDIA on Saturday quietly released a driver update (version 310.90) that fixes a recently-uncovered security vulnerability in the NVIDIA Display Driver service (nvvsvc.exe). The vulnerability was disclosed on Christmas day by Peter Winter-Smith, a researcher from the U.K. According to Rapid7′s HD Moore, the vulnerability allows a remote attacker with a valid domain account to gain super-user access to any desktop or laptop running the vulnerable service, and allows an attacker (or rogue user) with a low-privileged account to gain super-access to their own system. In addition to the security fix, driver version 310.90 addresses other bugs and brings performance increases for several games and applications for a number of GPUs including the GeForce 400/500/600 Series.”

Source: NVIDIA Releases Fix For Dangerous Display Driver Exploit

TSA ‘Secured’ Metrodome During Recent Football Game

January 5th, 2013 01:50 admin View Comments

Government

McGruber writes “Travel writer Christopher Elliott touches down with the news that the U.S. Transportation Security Administration was spotted standing around outside a recent American football game between the Minnesota Vikings and the Green Bay Packers (picture). According to Mr. Elliott, the ‘TSA goes to NFL games and political conventions and all kinds of places that have little or nothing to do with … travel. It even has a special division called VIPR — an unfortunate acronym for Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response team — that conducts these searches.’ He continues, ‘As far as I can tell, TSA is just asking questions at this point. “Data and results collected through the Highway BASE program will inform TSA’s policy and program initiatives and allow TSA to provide focused resources and tools to enhance the overall security posture within the surface transportation community,” it says in the filing. But they wouldn’t be wasting our money asking such questions unless they planned to aggressively expand VIPR at some point in the near future. And that means TSA agents at NFL games, in subways and at the port won’t be the exception anymore — they will be the rule.’”

Source: TSA ‘Secured’ Metrodome During Recent Football Game

Dutch Gov’t Offers Guidance For Responsible Disclosure Practices

January 4th, 2013 01:47 admin View Comments

Security

An anonymous reader sends this quote from an IDG News report: “The Dutch government’s cyber security center has published guidelines (in Dutch) that it hopes will encourage ethical hackers to disclose security vulnerabilities in a responsible way. The person who discovers the vulnerability should report it directly and as soon as possible to the owner of the system in a confidential manner, so the leak cannot be abused by others. Furthermore, the ethical hacker will not use social engineering techniques, nor install a backdoor or copy, modify or delete data from the system, the NCSC specified. Alternatively a hacker could make a directory listing in the system, the guidelines said. Hackers should also refrain from altering the system and not repeatedly access the system. Using brute-force techniques to access a system is also discouraged, the NCSC said. The ethical hacker further has to agree that vulnerabilities will only be disclosed after they are fixed and only with consent of the involved organization. The parties can also decide to inform the broader IT community if the vulnerability is new or it is suspected that more systems have the same vulnerability, the NCSC said.”

Source: Dutch Gov’t Offers Guidance For Responsible Disclosure Practices

Antivirus Software Performs Poorly Against New Threats

January 2nd, 2013 01:11 admin View Comments

Security

Hugh Pickens writes “Nicole Perlroth reports in the NY Times that the antivirus industry has a dirty little secret: antivirus products are not very good at stopping new viruses. Researchers collected and analyzed 82 new computer viruses and put them up against more than 40 antivirus products, made by top companies like Microsoft, Symantec, McAfee and Kaspersky Lab and found that the initial detection rate was less than 5 percent (PDF). ‘The bad guys are always trying to be a step ahead,’ says Matthew D. Howard, who previously set up the security strategy at Cisco Systems. ‘And it doesn’t take a lot to be a step ahead.’ Part of the problem is that antivirus products are inherently reactive. Just as medical researchers have to study a virus before they can create a vaccine, antivirus makers must capture a computer virus, take it apart and identify its ‘signature’ — unique signs in its code — before they can write a program that removes it. That process can take as little as a few hours or as long as several years. In May, researchers at Kaspersky Lab discovered Flame, a complex piece of malware that had been stealing data from computers for an estimated five years. ‘The traditional signature-based method of detecting malware is not keeping up,’ says Phil Hochmuth. Now the thinking goes that if it is no longer possible to block everything that is bad, then the security companies of the future will be the ones whose software can spot unusual behavior and clean up systems once they have been breached. ‘The bad guys are getting worse,’ says Howard. ‘Antivirus helps filter down the problem, but the next big security company will be the one that offers a comprehensive solution.’”

Source: Antivirus Software Performs Poorly Against New Threats

Huge Security Hole In Recent Samsung Devices

December 16th, 2012 12:27 admin View Comments

Android

An anonymous reader writes “A huge security hole has been discovered in recent Samsung devices including phones like the Galaxy S2 and S3. It is possible for every user to obtain root due to a custom faulty memory device created by Samsung.” The problem affects phones with the Exynos System-on-Chip.

Source: Huge Security Hole In Recent Samsung Devices

South Carolina Shows How Not To Do Security

December 15th, 2012 12:16 admin View Comments

Security

CowboyRobot writes “Earlier this year, the state’s Department of Revenue was storing 3.3 million bank account numbers, as well as 3.8 million tax returns containing Social Security numbers for 1.9 million children and other dependents, in an unencrypted format. After a state employee clicked on a malicious email link, an attacker was able to obtain copies of those records. It’s easy to blame the breach on ‘Russian hackers’ but who is really to blame? ‘The state’s leadership, from the governor on down, failed to take information security seriously or to correctly gauge the financial risk involved. As a result, taxpayers will pay extra to clean up the mess. Beyond the $800,000 that the state will spend — and should have already spent — to improve its information security systems, $500,000 will go to the data breach investigation, $740,000 to notify consumers and businesses, $250,000 for legal and PR help, and $12 million for identity theft monitoring services.’”

Source: South Carolina Shows How Not To Do Security

US Security Classifications Needs Re-Thinking, Says Board

December 6th, 2012 12:39 admin View Comments

Government

coondoggie writes “The US government’s overly complicated way of classifying and declassifying information needs to be dumped and reinvented with the help of a huge technology injection if it is to keep from being buried under its own weight. That was one of the main conclusions of a government board tasked with making recommendations on exactly how the government should transform the current security classification system.”

Source: US Security Classifications Needs Re-Thinking, Says Board

Book Reviews: Lockpicking Books From Deviant Ollam

December 5th, 2012 12:44 admin View Comments

Books

benrothke writes “It is well known that the password, while the most widespread information security mechanism, is also one of the most insecure. It comes down to the fact that the average person can’t create and maintain secure passwords. When it comes to physical locks, the average lock on your home and in your office is equally insecure. How insecure it in? In two fascinating books on the topic, Deviant Ollam writes in Practical Lock Picking, Second Edition: A Physical Penetration Testers Training Guide and Keys to the Kingdom: Impressioning, Privilege Escalation, Bumping, and Other Key-Based Attacks Against Physical Locks that it is really not that difficult. When it comes to information security penetration tests done on the client site, the testers will most often have permission to be inside the facility. On rare occasions, the testers need to find alternative means to gain entrance. Sometimes that means picking the locks.” Keep reading to learn if you’ll be picking locks soon.

Practical Lock Picking, 2nd ed. / Keys to the Kingdom
author Deviant Ollam
pages 296 / 256
publisher Syngress
rating 9/10
reviewer Ben Rothke
ISBN 978-1597499897 / 978-1597499835
summary Two excellent books on the fundamentals of lockpicking

Source: Book Reviews: Lockpicking Books From Deviant Ollam

The Rise of Feudal Computer Security

December 4th, 2012 12:25 admin View Comments

Security

Hugh Pickens writes “In the old days, traditional computer security centered around users. However, Bruce Schneier writes that now some of us have pledged our allegiance to Google (using Gmail, Google Calendar, Google Docs, and Android phones) while others have pledged allegiance to Apple (using Macintosh laptops, iPhones, iPads; and letting iCloud automatically synchronize and back up everything) while others of us let Microsoft do it all. ‘These vendors are becoming our feudal lords, and we are becoming their vassals. We might refuse to pledge allegiance to all of them — or to a particular one we don’t like. Or we can spread our allegiance around. But either way, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to not pledge allegiance to at least one of them.’ Classical medieval feudalism depended on overlapping, complex, hierarchical relationships. Today we users must trust the security of these hardware manufacturers, software vendors, and cloud providers and we choose to do it because of the convenience, redundancy, automation, and shareability. ‘In this new world of computing, we give up a certain amount of control, and in exchange we trust that our lords will both treat us well and protect us from harm (PDF). Not only will our software be continually updated with the newest and coolest functionality, but we trust it will happen without our being overtaxed by fees and required upgrades.’ In this system, we have no control over the security provided by our feudal lords. Like everything else in security, it’s a trade-off. We need to balance that trade-off. ‘In Europe, it was the rise of the centralized state and the rule of law that undermined the ad hoc feudal system; it provided more security and stability for both lords and vassals. But these days, government has largely abdicated its role in cyberspace, and the result is a return to the feudal relationships of yore,’ concludes Schneier, adding that perhaps it’s time for government to create the regulatory environments that protect us vassals. ‘Otherwise, we really are just serfs.’”

Source: The Rise of Feudal Computer Security

Interviews: Ask What You Will of Eugene Kaspersky

December 3rd, 2012 12:21 admin View Comments

Security

Eugene Kaspersky probably hates malware just as much as you do on his own machines, but as the head of Kaspersky Labs, the world’s largest privately held security software company, he might have a different perspective — the existence of malware and other forms of online malice drives the need for security software of all kinds, and not just on personal desktops or typical internet servers. The SCADA software vulnerabilities of the last few years have led him to announce work on an operating system for industrial control systems of the kind affected by Flame and Stuxnet. But Kaspersky is not just toiling away in the computer equivalent of the CDC: He’s been outspoken in his opinions — some of which have drawn ire on Slashdot, like calling for mandatory “Internet ID” and an “Internet Interpol”. He’s also come out in favor of Internet voting, and against SOPA, even pulling his company out of the BSA over it. More recently, he’s been criticized for ties to the current Russian government. (With regard to that Wired article, though, read Kaspersky’s detailed response to its claims.) Now, he’s agreed to answer Slashdot readers’ questions. As usual, you’re encouraged to ask all the question you’d like, but please confine your questions to one per post. We’ll pass on the best of these for Kaspersky’s answers.

Source: Interviews: Ask What You Will of Eugene Kaspersky

YOYOYOOYOYOYO