Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Sea’

Seas Rising Faster Than Projected

November 28th, 2012 11:49 admin View Comments

Earth

New submitter zenyu writes “IPCC’s 2mm per year estimate for sea level rise at current CO2 levels has proven too optimistic. Sea levels have been rising 3.2mm per year in the last two decades. The IPCC’s 50 cm — 100 cm projection for the next century may prove equally optimistic.”

Source: Seas Rising Faster Than Projected

Why It’s Bad That Smartphones Have Banished Boredom

September 27th, 2012 09:06 admin View Comments

Handhelds

Hugh Pickens writes writes “Doug Gross writes that thanks to technology, there’s been a recent sea change in how people today kill time. ‘Those dog-eared magazines in your doctor’s office are going unread. Your fellow customers in line at the deli counter are being ignored. And simply gazing around at one’s surroundings? Forget about it.’ With their games, music, videos, social media and texting, smartphones ‘superstimulate,’ a desire humans have to play when things get dull, says anthropologist Christopher Lynn and he believes that modern society may be making that desire even stronger. ‘When you’re habituated to constant stimulation, when you lack it, you sort of don’t know what to do with yourself …,’ says Lynn. ‘When we aren’t used to having down time, it results in anxiety. ‘Oh my god, I should be doing something.’ And we reach for the smartphone. It’s our omnipresent relief from that.’ Researchers say this all makes sense. Fiddling with our phones, they say, addresses a basic human need to cure boredom by any means necessary. But they also fear that by filling almost every second of down time by peering at our phones we are missing out on the creative and potentially rewarding ways we’ve dealt with boredom in days past. ‘Informational overload from all quarters means that there can often be very little time for personal thought, reflection, or even just ‘zoning out,’” researchers write. ‘With a mobile (phone) that is constantly switched on and a plethora of entertainments available to distract the naked eye, it is understandable that some people find it difficult to actually get bored in that particular fidgety, introspective kind of way.’”

Source: Why It’s Bad That Smartphones Have Banished Boredom

Sea Chair Project Harvests Plastic From the Oceans To Create Furniture

August 22nd, 2012 08:34 admin View Comments

Image

cylonlover writes “You may have heard about the huge floating islands of garbage swirling around in the middle of the Earth’s oceans. Much of that waterlogged rubbish is made up of plastic and, like Electrolux with its concept vacuum cleaners, U.K.-based Studio Swine and Kieren Jones are looking to put that waste to good use. As part of an ambitious project, they’ve come up with a system to collect plastic debris and convert it into furniture. Rather than collecting plastic that washes ashore or is snagged as by-catch in fishing nets, the team hopes to one day go where the trash is, collect and convert it to something useful while still at sea. Sea Chair envisions adapting fishing boats into floating chair factories that trawl for plastic and put it into production on-board.”

Source: Sea Chair Project Harvests Plastic From the Oceans To Create Furniture

Sea Level Rise Can’t Be Stopped

July 3rd, 2012 07:22 admin View Comments

Earth

riverat1 writes “Sea level rise won’t stop for several hundred years even if we reverse global warming, according to a study published in the journal Nature Climate Change. As warmer water is mixed down into the oceans, it causes thermal expansion of the water. Under the best emissions scenario, the expected rise is 14.2 cm by 2100; under the worst, 32.2 cm from thermal expansion alone. Any water pumped from aquifers or glacial/ice sheet melt is added to that.”

Source: Sea Level Rise Can’t Be Stopped

U.S. East Coast a Hotspot of Sea-Level Rise

June 26th, 2012 06:36 admin View Comments

Earth

Harperdog writes “Nature just published this study of sea-level rise (SLR) and how global warming does not force SLR to rise everywhere at the same rate. Interesting stuff about what, exactly, contributes to this uneven rise, and how the East Coast of the US, which used to have a relatively low sea level, is now a hotspot in that sea level there is rising faster than elsewhere.”

Source: U.S. East Coast a Hotspot of Sea-Level Rise

Human Water Use Accounts For 42% of Recent Sea Level Rise

May 22nd, 2012 05:00 admin View Comments

Earth

scibri writes “During the latter half of the twentieth century, global sea level rose by about 1.8 millimeters per year. The combined contribution from heating of the oceans, which makes the water expand, along with melting of ice caps and glaciers, is estimated to be 1.1 millimeters per year, which left some 0.7 millimeters per year unaccounted for. It seems that the effects of human water use on land could fill that gap. Researchers report in Nature Geoscience that land-based water storage could account for 0.77 millimeters per year, or 42%, of the observed sea-level rise between 1961 and 2003. The extraction of groundwater for irrigation and home and industrial use, with subsequent run-off to rivers and eventually to the oceans, represents the bulk of the contribution. It would be even worse if we weren’t also locking up lots of water from rivers behind dams like the Hoover Dam.”

Source: Human Water Use Accounts For 42% of Recent Sea Level Rise

NOAA Releases New Views of Earth’s Ocean Floor

April 17th, 2012 04:43 admin View Comments

Earth

fishmike writes “NOAA has made sea floor maps and other data on the world’s coasts, continental shelves and deep ocean available for easy viewing online. Anyone with Internet access can now explore undersea features and obtain detailed depictions of the sea floor and coasts, including deep canyons, ripples, landslides and likely fish habitat. The new online data viewer compiles sea floor data from the near shore to the deep blue, including the latest high-resolution bathymetric (sea bottom) data collected by NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey primarily to support nautical charting.”

Source: NOAA Releases New Views of Earth’s Ocean Floor

How the Sinking of the Titanic Sparked a Century of Radio Improvements

April 11th, 2012 04:56 admin View Comments

Wireless Networking

joshuarrrr writes “When the RMS Titanic scraped an iceberg on the night of 14 April 1912, its wireless operators began sending distress calls on one of the world’s most advanced radios: a 5-kilowatt rotary spark transmitter that on a clear night could send signals from the middle of the Atlantic to New York City or London. What the radio operators lacked, however, were international protocols for wireless communications at sea. At the time, US law only required ships to have one operator on board, and he was usually employed by the wireless companies, not the ship itself. On the 100th anniversary of the Titanic, IEEE Spectrum looks at how the tragedy accelerated the improvement of communications at sea.”

Source: How the Sinking of the Titanic Sparked a Century of Radio Improvements

Testing AI Methods With FlightGear

April 3rd, 2012 04:06 admin View Comments

AI

mikejuk writes “The open source flight simulator Flight Gear is great fun but it can also be used for serious research. Suppose you want to develop a drone that can roam the seas and spot debris so that ships can be directed to it and pick it up. It’s a good idea, but how do you test your methods? The obvious way is to take to the sea and fly a drone over real debris and see what happens. It uses a lot of fuel and generates a lot of sea sickness. Why not just fly a simulated drone over a simulated sea and save the sea sickness? This is what Curtis Olson, project manager at FlightGear and he explains how to get OpenCV to use the simulator as if it was a camera.”

Source: Testing AI Methods With FlightGear

Video: Coral’s Dramatic Yet Slo-Mo Emergence From the Sea Floor

February 9th, 2012 02:05 admin View Comments
YOYOYOOYOYOYO