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Posts Tagged ‘Science’

Forbes 2013 Career List Flamed By University Professors

January 5th, 2013 01:45 admin View Comments

Education

An anonymous reader writes “The Forbes list of ‘least stressful jobs’ for 2013 is headlined by… university professors. This comes at a time in which the academic community has been featured on controversies about 100-hour week work journeys, doctors live on food stamps, tenured staff is laid off large science institutions, and the National Science Foundation suffers severe budget cuts, besides the well known (and sometimes publicized) politics of publish or perish. The Forbes reporter has received abundant feedback and published a shy, foot-note ‘addendum’; however, the cited source, CareerCast (which does not map to any recognizable career journalist, but rather to a Sports writer), does not seem to have had the same luck. The comments of the Forbes reporter on the existence of a Summer break for graduates (‘I am curious whether professors work that hard over the summer’) are particularly noteworthy.” Here is the CareerCast report the article is based on, and a list of the “stress factors” they considered. The author of the Forbes article passed on a very detailed explanation of how tough a university professor’s job can be.

Source: Forbes 2013 Career List Flamed By University Professors

Insurance Industry Looking Hard At Climate Change

December 25th, 2012 12:24 admin View Comments

Businesses

A recent paper in Science (abstract) examines the insurance industry’s reaction to climate change. The industry rakes in trillions of dollars in revenues every year, and a shifting climate would have the potential to drastically cut into the profits left over after settlements have been paid. Hurricane Sandy alone did about $80 billion worth of damage to New York and New Jersey. With incredible amounts of money at stake, the industry is taking climate projections quite seriously. From the article: “Many insurers are using climate science to better quantify and diversify their exposure, more accurately price and communicate risk, and target adaptation and loss-prevention efforts. They also analyze their extensive databases of historical weather- and climate-related losses, for both large- and small-scale events. But insurance modeling is a distinct discipline. Unlike climate models, insurers’ models extrapolate historical data rather than simulate the climate system, and they require outputs at finer scales and shorter time frames than climate models.”

Source: Insurance Industry Looking Hard At Climate Change

Bennett’s Whimsi-Geek Gift Guide For 2012

December 10th, 2012 12:30 admin View Comments

Christmas Cheer

Frequent contributor Bennett Haselton writes this week with his favorite novelty science gift items for 2012. Levitation engines, puzzles, optical illusions brought to life, and all of the tips and tricks he’s found for getting the products to work correctly. Decorative, whimsical, and not too expensive — except for the items that have earned it by being pretty amazing. Read on for the details, and be sure to mention other good possibilities (Just 14 shopping days left until Christmas) in the comments below.

Source: Bennett’s Whimsi-Geek Gift Guide For 2012

Apollo Veteran: Skip Asteroid, Go To the Moon

December 7th, 2012 12:48 admin View Comments

Moon

astroengine writes “It’s 40 years to the day that the final mission to the moon launched. Discovery News speaks with Apollo 17 astronaut and geologist Harrison ‘Jack’ Schmitt about where he thinks the Earth’s only satellite came from and why he thinks a NASA manned asteroid mission is a mistake. ‘I think an asteroid is a diversion,’ said Schmitt. ‘If the ultimate goal is to get to Mars, you have a satellite only three days away that has a great deal of science as well as resources. The science of the moon has just been scratched. We’ve hardly explored the moon.’” The National Research Council came out with a report a few days ago which found that the inability for the U.S. to find a consensus on where to go is damaging its ability to get there. Bill Nye spoke about the issue, saying, “I believe, as a country, we want to move NASA from [being] an engineering organization to a science organization, and this is going to take years, decades. Now, through investment, we have companies emerging that are exploring space on their own and will ultimately lower the cost of access to low-Earth orbit, which will free up NASA to go to these new and exciting places.”

Source: Apollo Veteran: Skip Asteroid, Go To the Moon

NASA: New Mars Rover By 2020

December 4th, 2012 12:16 admin View Comments

Mars

coondoggie writes “Looking to build on the great success and popularity of its current Mars Science Laboratory mission, NASA today announced plans to explore the red planet further, including launching another sophisticated robot rover by 2020 and widely expanding other Mars scientific projects. The plan to design and build a new Mars robotic science rover — which will mirror the technology employed with the current Curiosity rover — will advance the science priorities of the National Research Council’s 2011 Planetary Science Decadal Survey (the report from the community and team of scientists that help NASA prioritize space missions) and further the research needed to send humans to the planet sometime around 2030, NASA said.”

Source: NASA: New Mars Rover By 2020

Ask Slashdot: Tablets For Papers; Are We There Yet?

December 1st, 2012 12:05 admin View Comments

Handhelds

An anonymous reader writes “When I was younger, engineering and science offices didn’t have computers yet. It was the tradition: Piled Higher and Deeper desks, and overloaded bookcases. I ended up doing other things, and haven’t been in a regular office for a couple of decades. Now I’m older, spending a lot more time with the screen, and finding my aging butt and back aren’t as pliable for the long hours of reading papers. And while looking at rather expensive chairs, etc for a solution, what I’m remembering is we used to be able to lean back, feet up, while reading the stapled print-outs — makes a change from hunched-over writing and typing. So I’m what wondering is this: Are We There Yet with tablets? You guys would know — What makes a good tablet for reading, sorting, annotating, and searching PDFs, etc? Hardware and software — what tablets have gotten this really right?”

Source: Ask Slashdot: Tablets For Papers; Are We There Yet?

Lamar Smith, Future Chairman For the House Committee On Science, Space, and Technology

November 28th, 2012 11:29 admin View Comments

Government

An anonymous reader writes “Lamar Smith, a global warming skeptic, will become the new chairman of the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. Someone who disagrees with the vast majority of scientists will be given partial jurisdiction over NASA, EPA, DOE, NSF, NOAA, and the USGS. When will candidates who are actually qualified to represent science or at a minimum show an interest in it be the representatives of science with regard to political decision-making?”

Source: Lamar Smith, Future Chairman For the House Committee On Science, Space, and Technology

Ask Slashdot: Math and Science iOS Apps For Young Kids?

November 23rd, 2012 11:59 admin View Comments

IOS

Oyjord writes “I have a very smart and curious 3-year-old daughter. Before anyone tries to derail my query, yes, we get a lot of play time outside with soccer and baseballs, and inside with blocks, Hot Wheels, PlayDoh, etc. However, on the rare occasion that we do sit down with my iPad, I’d like to solicit recommendations for good Math and Science apps for kids. There are hundreds of horribly gender-biased baking apps and Barbie apps for young girls, but they turn my stomach. She has a wonderfully curious mind, and really likes SkyView already, but I feel lost in a sea of pink and Hello Kitty apps.”

Source: Ask Slashdot: Math and Science iOS Apps For Young Kids?

The Science of Thanks Giving

November 22nd, 2012 11:10 admin View Comments

Medicine

Hugh Pickens writes writes “This is Americans’ big week to give thanks. Now Russell McLendon writes that giving thanks can do wonders for the human brain according to researchers at UC Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center where scientists have developed an easy way for people to do just that and, at the same time, contribute to a national research project and maybe also improve their lives. The project is part of a $5.6 million, three-year national effort called ‘Expanding the Science and Practice of Gratitude,’ funded by the John Templeton Foundation. The center has gone live with Thnx4.org, an interactive, shareable gratitude journal and has invited people in the campus community to take part in the Cal Gratitude Challenge by keeping a two-week online ‘gratitude journal’ and, if they choose, sharing their posts with others. Early research into the power of gratitude journals ended up proving that students who wrote down everything they were grateful for strengthened their overall resilience and became less vulnerable to everyday stresses and complaints like rashes and headaches, says Emiliana Simon-Thomas. ‘Thnx4.org wanted to make this spiral notebook very accessible, and to make the research a little more specific than it has been historically,’ says Simon-Thomas. Online, anyone can take part — and potentially reap the benefits. The Cal Gratitude Challenge opened November 1 and will remain open throughout November but the project has a three-year grant and participants will be able to maintain their journals for the duration and first results from the data are expected in January. ‘We affirm that there are good things in the world, gifts and benefits we’ve received,’ writes Robert Emmons as part of the project. ‘This doesn’t mean that life is perfect; it doesn’t ignore complaints, burdens, and hassles. But when we look at life as a whole, gratitude encourages us to identify some amount of goodness in our life.’”

Source: The Science of Thanks Giving

Climate Contrarians Seek Leadership of House Science Committee

November 20th, 2012 11:01 admin View Comments

Earth

An article at Ars examines three members of the U.S. House of Representatives who are seeking chairmanship of its Committee on Space, Science, and Technology. Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA) said in an interview, “My analysis is that in the global warming debate, we won. There were a lot of scientists who were just going along with the flow on the idea that mankind was causing a change in the world’s climate. I think that after 10 years of debate, we can show that that there are hundreds if not thousands of scientists who have come over to being skeptics, and I don’t know anyone [who was a skeptic] who became a believer in global warming.” James Sensenbrenner (R-WI) has a similar record of opposing climate change, as does Lamar Smith (R-TX). Relatedly, Phil Plait, a.k.a. The Bad Astronomer, has posted an article highlighting how U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL), a member of the Senate’s Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, has declined to answer a question about how old the Earth is, calling it “one of the great mysteries.”

Source: Climate Contrarians Seek Leadership of House Science Committee

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