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Posts Tagged ‘Rob’

Royalty-Free MPEG Video Proposals Announced

December 10th, 2011 12:07 admin View Comments

Media

theweatherelectric writes “Rob Glidden notes on his blog that MPEG has recently ‘announced it has received proposals for a royalty-free MPEG standard and has settled on a deliberation process to consider them.’ There are two tracks toward royalty-free video currently under consideration by MPEG. The first track is IVC, a new standard ‘based on MPEG-1 technology which is believed a safe royalty-free baseline that can be enhanced by additional unencumbered technology described in MPEG-2, JPEG, research publications and innovative technologies which are promised to be subject to royalty-free licenses.’ The second proposed track is WebVC, an attempt to get the constrained baseline profile of H.264 licensed under royalty-free terms. Rob Glidden offers an analysis of both proposals. Also of interest is Rob’s short history of why royalty-free H.264 failed last time.”

Source: Royalty-Free MPEG Video Proposals Announced

Cartoon: Hasta La Visa, Baby

November 27th, 2011 11:00 admin View Comments

rob robot 150.jpgThere’s a lot to like about Cyber Monday – the day online retailers try to woo us out of the big box stores and into virtual ones – over Black Friday.

First, you can do Cyber Monday in your pyjamas. Hell, you can do it with no clothes at all. Black Friday (as the court order the mall sent me makes very clear) is not pants-optional.

Second, number of people pepper-sprayed by a competing shopper on Cyber Monday: zero. On Black Friday: at least 20.

Third… well, actually, I’m right back to number one. If I’m going to engage in naked consumerism, then dammit, let it be naked consumerism.

See more Noise to Signal cartoons here. Most of them were drawn while Rob was more or less fully clothed.

rob robot.png

Source: Cartoon: Hasta La Visa, Baby

How To Rob a Bank: One Social Engineer’s Story

October 27th, 2011 10:08 admin View Comments

Businesses

itwbennett writes “Today’s criminals aren’t stealing money — that’s so yesterday, according to professional social engineer Jim Stickley. In an interview with CSO’s Joan Goodchild, Stickley explains how he’s broken into financial institutions large and small, and stolen their sensitive data. In a companion story, Stickley walks through the steps he takes to fool clients into thinking he’s there for fire safety, while he’s really proving they are an easy target for a data breach.”

Source: How To Rob a Bank: One Social Engineer’s Story

Deus Ex Eyeborg Documentary Shows Today’s Cyborgs

August 28th, 2011 08:02 admin View Comments

Medicine

jjp9999 writes “A documentary commissioned by Eidos Montreal explores the possibilities of cyborg technology found in Deus Ex: Human Revolution, comparing it to technology found today. The 12-minute film is narrated by filmmaker Rob ‘Eyeborg’ Spence, known for his glowing prosthetic eye that connects to an electronic receiver, and follows him around the world as he meets with leaders in biotechnology and with people who have bionic prosthetics — all the while comparing the technology to what’s found in Deus Ex.”

Source: Deus Ex Eyeborg Documentary Shows Today’s Cyborgs

Deus Ex Eyeborg Documentary Shows Today’s Cyborgs

August 28th, 2011 08:02 admin View Comments

Medicine

jjp9999 writes “A documentary commissioned by Eidos Montreal explores the possibilities of cyborg technology found in Deus Ex: Human Revolution, comparing it to technology found today. The 12-minute film is narrated by filmmaker Rob ‘Eyeborg’ Spence, known for his glowing prosthetic eye that connects to an electronic receiver, and follows him around the world as he meets with leaders in biotechnology and with people who have bionic prosthetics — all the while comparing the technology to what’s found in Deus Ex.”

Source: Deus Ex Eyeborg Documentary Shows Today’s Cyborgs

So Long, CmdrTaco, and Thanks For All The Posts

August 25th, 2011 08:17 admin View Comments

Slashdot.org

With CmdrTaco moving on to his temporary retirement home, the Slashdot editors who will continue to poke and prod at reader submissions (the heart and soul of this site: without readers, there’d be nothing to talk about as well as no one to talk about it) would like to offer an extended ‘Thank You’ to Rob, and offer some thoughts on the years so far, as well as what comes next. (Of late, though, we’re lucky to have the growing contributions of Clinton Ebadi, aka Unknown Lamer, who got an oddball start on the Slashdot page a long time back.) Read on for a few words from Samzenpus, timothy, and Soulskill.

Source: So Long, CmdrTaco, and Thanks For All The Posts

CmdrTaco Steps Down as Editor-in-Chief of Slashdot

August 25th, 2011 08:07 admin View Comments

slashdot_150.pngRob “CmdrTaco” Malda has announced his resignation as editor-in-chief of Slashdot after 14 years and over 15,000 stories posted. IN his farewell post, Malda cites “dramatic” changes to the Internet since Slashdot’s inception. “For me,” writes Malda, “the Slashdot of today is fused to the Slashdot of the past. This makes it really hard to objectively consider the future of the site. While my corporate overlords and I haven’t seen eye to eye on every decision in the last decade, I am certain that Jeff Drobick and the other executives at Geeknet will do their best.”

slashdot_july10.jpg
In its 14 years online under Malda’s guidance, Slashdot has posted over 114,000 stories. On his website, Malda has written that typical Slashdot topics range from “Linux, Open Source Software, Legos, Games, Star Wars, Science [and] Technology.” The impact of Slashdot traffic was once so profound that the term “slashdotted” entered the lexicon to describe websites brought down by its awesome traffic referral power. But the dramatic changes Malda cites have affected the format of online stories as well as the content, and the shifts in activity to newer sites reflect a Slashdot community that is resistant to change.

Slashdot has struggled to remain relevant across the Web as more mainstream communities like Digg, Hacker News, Reddit and StumbleUpon have taken over geek-news aggregation duties. But Slashdot’s community has yet to be replicated on any of these upstart sites. “Slashdot is for nerds too nerdy to be called geeks,” says ReadWriteWeb nerd-in-residence Tyler Gillies. It’s “full of nerds,” adds ReadWriteWeb’s Marshall Kirkpatrick. “Real nerds.”

The Community’s Take on Slashdot
A year ago, when we began to notice a marked decline in traffic to ReadWriteWeb from Slashdot, we asked our readers via Twitter if they still check slashdot. Many said they had drastically cut back their visits in favor of other communities:

@peterc: “Still visit /. once a week or so but no longer contribute (used to be a heavy user). Use HN & Reddit mainly now, never Digg.”

@jezlyn: “I haven’t read /. in many years. Got tired of the snotty attitude and comment wars.”

Others remained loyal, but they expressed frustration at Slashdot’s slowness to embrace what freelance Web developer @pluc called “the realtime wave.”

Still, there seems to be a certain je-ne-sais-quoi about Slashdot’s community. “It continues to have a community feel that the other sites you mention do not have,” said Adam Monago via Twitter. Monago feels that the new nerd aggregation sites “do not have [an] identifiable set of traits or ideals that bind their users in the same way as Slashdot.” For his part, Malda is confident that this community will endure: “My old mantra: News for Nerds, Stuff that Matters still holds true here today. Nobody does it better.”

Are you a Slashdot reader? How do you feel about CmdrTaco’s departure? Let us know in the comments.

Source: CmdrTaco Steps Down as Editor-in-Chief of Slashdot

CmdrTaco Steps Down as Editor-in-Chief of Slashdot

August 25th, 2011 08:07 admin View Comments

slashdot_150.pngRob “CmdrTaco” Malda has announced his resignation as editor-in-chief of Slashdot after 14 years and over 15,000 stories posted. IN his farewell post, Malda cites “dramatic” changes to the Internet since Slashdot’s inception. “For me,” writes Malda, “the Slashdot of today is fused to the Slashdot of the past. This makes it really hard to objectively consider the future of the site. While my corporate overlords and I haven’t seen eye to eye on every decision in the last decade, I am certain that Jeff Drobick and the other executives at Geeknet will do their best.”

slashdot_july10.jpg
In its 14 years online under Malda’s guidance, Slashdot has posted over 114,000 stories. On his website, Malda has written that typical Slashdot topics range from “Linux, Open Source Software, Legos, Games, Star Wars, Science [and] Technology.” The impact of Slashdot traffic was once so profound that the term “slashdotted” entered the lexicon to describe websites brought down by its awesome traffic referral power. But the dramatic changes Malda cites have affected the format of online stories as well as the content, and the shifts in activity to newer sites reflect a Slashdot community that is resistant to change.

Slashdot has struggled to remain relevant across the Web as more mainstream communities like Digg, Hacker News, Reddit and StumbleUpon have taken over geek-news aggregation duties. But Slashdot’s community has yet to be replicated on any of these upstart sites. “Slashdot is for nerds too nerdy to be called geeks,” says ReadWriteWeb nerd-in-residence Tyler Gillies. It’s “full of nerds,” adds ReadWriteWeb’s Marshall Kirkpatrick. “Real nerds.”

The Community’s Take on Slashdot
A year ago, when we began to notice a marked decline in traffic to ReadWriteWeb from Slashdot, we asked our readers via Twitter if they still check slashdot. Many said they had drastically cut back their visits in favor of other communities:

@peterc: “Still visit /. once a week or so but no longer contribute (used to be a heavy user). Use HN & Reddit mainly now, never Digg.”

@jezlyn: “I haven’t read /. in many years. Got tired of the snotty attitude and comment wars.”

Others remained loyal, but they expressed frustration at Slashdot’s slowness to embrace what freelance Web developer @pluc called “the realtime wave.”

Still, there seems to be a certain je-ne-sais-quoi about Slashdot’s community. “It continues to have a community feel that the other sites you mention do not have,” said Adam Monago via Twitter. Monago feels that the new nerd aggregation sites “do not have [an] identifiable set of traits or ideals that bind their users in the same way as Slashdot.” For his part, Malda is confident that this community will endure: “My old mantra: News for Nerds, Stuff that Matters still holds true here today. Nobody does it better.”

Are you a Slashdot reader? How do you feel about CmdrTaco’s departure? Let us know in the comments.

Source: CmdrTaco Steps Down as Editor-in-Chief of Slashdot

CmdrTaco Steps Down as Editor-in-Chief of Slashdot

August 25th, 2011 08:07 admin View Comments

slashdot_150.pngRob “CmdrTaco” Malda has announced his resignation as editor-in-chief of Slashdot after 14 years and over 15,000 stories posted. IN his farewell post, Malda cites “dramatic” changes to the Internet since Slashdot’s inception. “For me,” writes Malda, “the Slashdot of today is fused to the Slashdot of the past. This makes it really hard to objectively consider the future of the site. While my corporate overlords and I haven’t seen eye to eye on every decision in the last decade, I am certain that Jeff Drobick and the other executives at Geeknet will do their best.”

slashdot_july10.jpg
In its 14 years online under Malda’s guidance, Slashdot has posted over 114,000 stories. On his website, Malda has written that typical Slashdot topics range from “Linux, Open Source Software, Legos, Games, Star Wars, Science [and] Technology.” The impact of Slashdot traffic was once so profound that the term “slashdotted” entered the lexicon to describe websites brought down by its awesome traffic referral power. But the dramatic changes Malda cites have affected the format of online stories as well as the content, and the shifts in activity to newer sites reflect a Slashdot community that is resistant to change.

Slashdot has struggled to remain relevant across the Web as more mainstream communities like Digg, Hacker News, Reddit and StumbleUpon have taken over geek-news aggregation duties. But Slashdot’s community has yet to be replicated on any of these upstart sites. “Slashdot is for nerds too nerdy to be called geeks,” says ReadWriteWeb nerd-in-residence Tyler Gillies. It’s “full of nerds,” adds ReadWriteWeb’s Marshall Kirkpatrick. “Real nerds.”

The Community’s Take on Slashdot
A year ago, when we began to notice a marked decline in traffic to ReadWriteWeb from Slashdot, we asked our readers via Twitter if they still check slashdot. Many said they had drastically cut back their visits in favor of other communities:

@peterc: “Still visit /. once a week or so but no longer contribute (used to be a heavy user). Use HN & Reddit mainly now, never Digg.”

@jezlyn: “I haven’t read /. in many years. Got tired of the snotty attitude and comment wars.”

Others remained loyal, but they expressed frustration at Slashdot’s slowness to embrace what freelance Web developer @pluc called “the realtime wave.”

Still, there seems to be a certain je-ne-sais-quoi about Slashdot’s community. “It continues to have a community feel that the other sites you mention do not have,” said Adam Monago via Twitter. Monago feels that the new nerd aggregation sites “do not have [an] identifiable set of traits or ideals that bind their users in the same way as Slashdot.” For his part, Malda is confident that this community will endure: “My old mantra: News for Nerds, Stuff that Matters still holds true here today. Nobody does it better.”

Are you a Slashdot reader? How do you feel about CmdrTaco’s departure? Let us know in the comments.

Source: CmdrTaco Steps Down as Editor-in-Chief of Slashdot

CmdrTaco Steps Down as Editor-in-Chief of Slashdot

August 25th, 2011 08:07 admin View Comments

slashdot_150.pngRob “CmdrTaco” Malda has announced his resignation as editor-in-chief of Slashdot after 14 years and over 15,000 stories posted. IN his farewell post, Malda cites “dramatic” changes to the Internet since Slashdot’s inception. “For me,” writes Malda, “the Slashdot of today is fused to the Slashdot of the past. This makes it really hard to objectively consider the future of the site. While my corporate overlords and I haven’t seen eye to eye on every decision in the last decade, I am certain that Jeff Drobick and the other executives at Geeknet will do their best.”

slashdot_july10.jpg
In its 14 years online under Malda’s guidance, Slashdot has posted over 114,000 stories. On his website, Malda has written that typical Slashdot topics range from “Linux, Open Source Software, Legos, Games, Star Wars, Science [and] Technology.” The impact of Slashdot traffic was once so profound that the term “slashdotted” entered the lexicon to describe websites brought down by its awesome traffic referral power. But the dramatic changes Malda cites have affected the format of online stories as well as the content, and the shifts in activity to newer sites reflect a Slashdot community that is resistant to change.

Slashdot has struggled to remain relevant across the Web as more mainstream communities like Digg, Hacker News, Reddit and StumbleUpon have taken over geek-news aggregation duties. But Slashdot’s community has yet to be replicated on any of these upstart sites. “Slashdot is for nerds too nerdy to be called geeks,” says ReadWriteWeb nerd-in-residence Tyler Gillies. It’s “full of nerds,” adds ReadWriteWeb’s Marshall Kirkpatrick. “Real nerds.”

The Community’s Take on Slashdot
A year ago, when we began to notice a marked decline in traffic to ReadWriteWeb from Slashdot, we asked our readers via Twitter if they still check slashdot. Many said they had drastically cut back their visits in favor of other communities:

@peterc: “Still visit /. once a week or so but no longer contribute (used to be a heavy user). Use HN & Reddit mainly now, never Digg.”

@jezlyn: “I haven’t read /. in many years. Got tired of the snotty attitude and comment wars.”

Others remained loyal, but they expressed frustration at Slashdot’s slowness to embrace what freelance Web developer @pluc called “the realtime wave.”

Still, there seems to be a certain je-ne-sais-quoi about Slashdot’s community. “It continues to have a community feel that the other sites you mention do not have,” said Adam Monago via Twitter. Monago feels that the new nerd aggregation sites “do not have [an] identifiable set of traits or ideals that bind their users in the same way as Slashdot.” For his part, Malda is confident that this community will endure: “My old mantra: News for Nerds, Stuff that Matters still holds true here today. Nobody does it better.”

Are you a Slashdot reader? How do you feel about CmdrTaco’s departure? Let us know in the comments.

Source: CmdrTaco Steps Down as Editor-in-Chief of Slashdot

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