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Posts Tagged ‘question’

What Are the Unwritten Rules of Deleting Code?

January 6th, 2013 01:04 admin View Comments

Programming

Press2ToContinue writes “I came across this page that asks the question, ‘what are the unwritten rules of deleting code?’ It made me realize that I have seen no references to generally-accepted best-practice documents regarding code modification, deletion, or rewrites. I would imagine /.’s have come across them if they exist. The answers may be somewhat language-dependent, but what best practices do /.’s use when they modify production code?”

Source: What Are the Unwritten Rules of Deleting Code?

What will programming look like in 2020?

December 12th, 2012 12:02 admin View Comments

Things are too quiet lately, so maybe its time to start a fun thread. I used this question as a lead in to a presentation on live programming I recently gave at a working group, but I thought it would be fun to gather a bunch of predictions if anyone is willing.

What will programming look like in 2020? Keep in mind that programming in 2012 mostly resembles programming in 2004, so could we even expect any significant changes 8 years from now in the programmer experience? Consider the entire programming stack of language, environment, process, libraries, search technology, and so on.

Source: What will programming look like in 2020?

The First Amendment and Software Speech

November 15th, 2012 11:40 admin View Comments

Software

First time accepted submitter stanlrev writes “When is software, or content generated by software, ‘speech’ for First Amendment purposes? That is the question that Andrew Tutt seeks to answer in an article published today in the Stanford Law Review Online. He argues that the two approaches commentators and the Supreme Court have proposed are both incorrect. Software or software-generated content is not always speech simply because it conveys information. Nor is software only speech when it resembles traditional art forms. Instead, the courts should turn to the original purposes of the First Amendment to develop a new approach that answers this question more effectively.”

Source: The First Amendment and Software Speech

Would Charles Darwin Have Made a Good Congressman?

November 9th, 2012 11:08 admin View Comments

It's funny. Laugh.

sciencehabit writes “It’s a good 130 years too late to answer that question empirically, but at least symbolically Charles Darwin has won support from more than 4000 voters in the 10th congressional district of Georgia, thanks to an initiative headed by James Leebens-Mack, a plant biologist at the University of Georgia in Athens. Like many others, Leebens-Mack was deeply troubled by a speech his Congressman, Paul Broun (R-GA), gave at an Athens church in October deriding teachings on evolution, embryology, and the big bang theory as ‘lies straight from the pit of Hell.’ Broun, a medical doctor, is a member of the U.S. House of Representative’s Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, and chair of its Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight. Leebens-Mack says the ‘protest vote should make it clear to future opponents that there are a lot of people in the district who are not happy with antiscience statements.’”

Source: Would Charles Darwin Have Made a Good Congressman?

Massachusetts “Right To Repair” Initiative On Ballot, May Override Compromise

November 5th, 2012 11:03 admin View Comments

Transportation

skids writes “MA voters face a complex technical and economic question Tuesday about just how open automobile makers should be with their repair and diagnostic interfaces. A legislative compromise struck in July may not be strong enough for consumer’s tastes. Proponents of the measure had joined opponents in asking voters to skip the question once the legislature, seeking to avoid legislation by ballot, struck the deal. Weeks before the election they have reversed course and are again urging voters to pass the measure. Now voters have to decide whether the differences between the ballot language and the new law are too hard on manufacturers, or essential consumer protections. At stake is a mandated standard for diagnostic channels in a significant market.”

Source: Massachusetts “Right To Repair” Initiative On Ballot, May Override Compromise

Has the Mars Rover Sniffed Methane?

November 2nd, 2012 11:33 admin View Comments

Mars

First time accepted submitter GrimAndBearIt writes “NASA’s Curiosity rover is poised to settle years of debate on the question of atmospheric methane on Mars, which would be a sign of microbial life. With parts per trillion sensitivity, it’s not so much a question of whether the rover will be able to smell trace amounts of methane, but rather a question of how much. NASA has announced that Grotzinger’s team will discuss atmospheric measurements at a briefing on 2 November. If the rover has detected methane at sufficiently high concentration, or exhibiting temporal variations of the kind that suggests microbial activity, then it will surely motivate a desire to identify and map the sources.”

Source: Has the Mars Rover Sniffed Methane?

72% of Xbox 360 Gamers Approve of “More Military Drone Strikes”

October 25th, 2012 10:53 admin View Comments

The Military

An anonymous reader writes “During the latest presidential debate, Xbox 360 owners were being polled live, as the debate was progressing, on a number of different questions, and asked to answer ‘Yes,’ ‘No,’ or ‘Don’t Know’ using their gamepad. Out of these questions, one particular question produced a surprising result: Xbox 360 owners were asked ‘Do you support more use of drone aircraft to attack suspected terrorists?’ 20% answered this question with ‘No’. 8% answered ‘Don’t know.’ And a whopping 72% answered the question ‘Yes.’ This raises an interesting question in and of itself: Is the average Xbox 360 player at all aware that drone strikes in countries like Pakistan cause a serious number of civilian deaths on a regular basis? Or do Xbox 360 gamers live in a parallel, game-inspired universe, where a real world ‘Drone Strike’ is something seriously cool, just like it is cool to use it in popular games like Call of Duty? In other words, does playing simulated war games like COD on a game console on a daily basis, and enjoying these games, cause gamers to become blinkered to the at times seriously dire real world consequences of using military tactics like drone strikes for real?”

Source: 72% of Xbox 360 Gamers Approve of “More Military Drone Strikes”

Ask Slashdot: Dedicating Code?

October 14th, 2012 10:03 admin View Comments

Programming

First time accepted submitter The_Buse writes “This week I lost my grandmother and after returning to work (as a web developer) I find myself looking for some way to dedicate something to her memory. Unfortunately, I’m no author so I can’t dedicate a book to her, and I can’t carry a tune so penning a song in her honor is out of the question. What I can do is write one hell of a web app, and after nearly a year of development my (small) team and I are nearing the release date of our next product. My question is, have you ever dedicated a project/app/code in honor of someone? What’s the best way to do it: comment blocks in the header, tongue-in-cheek file names, Easter eggs? Or is this a horrible idea all together?”

Source: Ask Slashdot: Dedicating Code?

Linus Torvalds Answers Your Questions

October 11th, 2012 10:35 admin View Comments

Slashdot.org

Monday you had a chance to ask Linus Torvalds any question you wanted. We sent him a dozen of the highest rated and below you’ll see what he has to say about computers, programming, books, and copyrights. He also talks about what he would have done differently with Linux if he had to do it all over again. Hint: it rhymes with nothing.

Source: Linus Torvalds Answers Your Questions

Is Mobile Broadband a Luxury Or a Human Right?

October 10th, 2012 10:00 admin View Comments

Wireless Networking

concealment sends this quote from an article at CNN: “Moderating a discussion on the future of broadband, Mashable editor-in-chief Lance Ulanoff tossed a provocative question to the audience: ‘By quick show of hands, how many out there think that broadband is a luxury?’ Next question: ‘How many out there think it is a human right?‘ That option easily carried the audience vote. Broadband access is too important to society to be relegated to a small, privileged portion of the world population, Hans Vestberg, president and CEO of Ericsson, said during the discussion. Dr. Hamadoun Touré, secretary-general of the International Telecommunication Union, echoed Vestberg’s remarks. ‘We need to make sure all the world’s inhabitants are connected to the goodies of the online world, which means better health care, better education, more sustainable economic and social development,’ Touré said.”

Source: Is Mobile Broadband a Luxury Or a Human Right?

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