Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Program’

NSA Targeting Domestic Computer Systems

December 23rd, 2012 12:21 admin View Comments

Government

The NSA was originally supposed to handle foreign intelligence, and leave the domestic spying to other agencies, but Presto Vivace writes with this bit from CNET: “‘The National Security Agency’s Perfect Citizen program hunts for vulnerabilities in ‘large-scale’ utilities, including power grid and gas pipeline controllers, new documents from EPIC show.’ ‘Perfect Citizen?’ Who thinks up these names?” “The program is scheduled to continue through at least September 2014,” says the article.

Source: NSA Targeting Domestic Computer Systems

DARPA Begins Work On 100Gbps Wireless Tech With 120-mile Range

December 17th, 2012 12:53 admin View Comments

Network

MrSeb writes “DARPA has begun development of a wireless communications link that is capable of 100 gigabits per second over a range of 200 kilometers (124mi). Officially dubbed ’100 Gb/s RF Backbone’ (or 100G for short), the program will provide the US military with networks that are around 50 times faster than its current wireless links. In essence, DARPA wants to give deployed soldiers the same kind of connectivity as a high-bandwidth, low-latency fiber-optic network. In the case of Afghanistan, for example, the US might have a high-speed fiber link to Turkey — but the remaining 1,000 miles to Afghanistan most likely consists of low-bandwidth, high-latency links. It’s difficult (and potentially insecure) to control UAVs or send/receive intelligence over these networks, and so the US military instead builds its own wireless network using Common Data Link. CDL maxes out at around 250Mbps, so 100Gbps would be quite a speed boost. DARPA clearly states that the 100G program is for US military use — but it’s hard to ignore the repercussions it might have on commercial networks, too. 100Gbps wireless backhaul links between cell towers, rather than costly and cumbersome fiber links, would make it much easier and cheaper to roll out additional mobile coverage. Likewise, 100Gbps wireless links might be the ideal way to provide backhaul links to rural communities that are still stuck with dial-up internet access. Who knows, we might even one day have 100Gbps wireless links to our ISP.”

Source: DARPA Begins Work On 100Gbps Wireless Tech With 120-mile Range

Ask Slashdot: Setting Up a Summer Camp Tech Center?

December 15th, 2012 12:20 admin View Comments

Education

First time accepted submitter michaelknauf writes “I’m running a large summer camp that’s primarily concerned with performing arts: music, dance, circus, magic, theater, art, and I want to add some more tech into the program. We already do some iOS game design with Stencyl. We also have an extensive model railroad and remote control car program and a pretty big computer lab (about 100 Apple machines). Our program provides all materials as part of tuition, so I’ve stayed away from robotics as a matter of cost, but I’d love to buy a 3D printer and do classes with that and the Arduino is cheap enough to make some small electronics projects sensible… where do I find the sort of people who could teach such a program as a summer gig? What projects make sense without spending too much cash on a per project basis but would be cool fun for kids and would teach them?”

Source: Ask Slashdot: Setting Up a Summer Camp Tech Center?

Auto-threading Compiler Could Restore Moore’s Law Gains

December 3rd, 2012 12:06 admin View Comments

Programming

New submitter Nemo the Magnificent writes “Develop in the Cloud has news about what might be a breakthrough out of Microsoft Research. A team there wrote a paper (PDF), now accepted for publication at OOPSLA, that describes how to teach a compiler to auto-thread a program that was written single-threaded in a conventional language like C#. This is the holy grail to take advantage of multiple cores — to get Moore’s Law improvements back on track, after they essentially ran aground in the last decade. (Functional programming, the other great white hope, just isn’t happening.) About 2004 was when Intel et al. ran into a wall and started packing multiple cores into chips instead of cranking the clock speed. The Microsoft team modified a C# compiler to use the new technique, and claim a ‘large project at Microsoft’ have written ‘several million lines of code’ testing out the resulting ‘safe parallelism.’” The paper is a good read if you’re into compilers and functional programming. The key to operation is adding permissions to reference types allowing you to declare normal references, read-only references to mutable objects, references to globally immutable objects, and references to isolated clusters of objects. With that information, the compiler is able to prove that chunks of code can safely be run in parallel. Unlike many other approaches, it doesn’t require that your program be purely functional either.

Source: Auto-threading Compiler Could Restore Moore’s Law Gains

Red Light Cameras Raise Crash Risk, Cost

November 27th, 2012 11:33 admin View Comments

Government

concealment writes with news of dissatisfaction with a pilot program for stoplight-monitoring cameras. The program ran for several years in New Jersey, and according to a new report, the number of car crashes actually increased while the cameras were present. “[The program] appears to be changing drivers’ behavior, state officials said Monday, noting an overall decline in traffic citations and right-angle crashes. The Department of Transportation also said, however, that rear-end crashes have risen by 20 percent and total crashes are up by 0.9 percent at intersections where cameras have operated for at least a year. The agency recommended the program stay in place, calling for ‘continued data collection and monitoring’ of camera-monitored intersections. The department’s report drew immediate criticism from Assemblyman Declan O’Scanlon, R-Monmouth, who wants the cameras removed. He called the program ‘a dismal failure,’ saying DOT statistics show the net costs of accidents had climbed by more than $1 million at intersections with cameras.” Other cities are considering dumping the monitoring tech as well, citing similar cost and efficacy issues.

Source: Red Light Cameras Raise Crash Risk, Cost

How Do We Program Moral Machines?

November 27th, 2012 11:37 admin View Comments

AI

nicholast writes “If your driverless car is about to crash into a bus, should it veer off a bridge? NYU Prof. Gary Marcus has a good essay about the need to program ethics and morality into our future machines. Quoting: ‘Within two or three decades the difference between automated driving and human driving will be so great you may not be legally allowed to drive your own car, and even if you are allowed, it would immoral of you to drive, because the risk of you hurting yourself or another person will be far greater than if you allowed a machine to do the work. That moment will be significant not just because it will signal the end of one more human niche, but because it will signal the beginning of another: the era in which it will no longer be optional for machines to have ethical systems.’”

Source: How Do We Program Moral Machines?

Cyber Corps Program Trains Spies For the Digital Age, In Oklahoma

November 24th, 2012 11:22 admin View Comments

Education

David Hume writes “The Los Angeles Times has a story about the two-year University of Tulsa Cyber Corps Program. About ’85% of the 260 graduates since 2003 have gone to the NSA, which students call “the fraternity,” or the CIA, which they call “the sorority.”‘ ‘Other graduates have taken positions with the FBI, NASA and the Department of Homeland Security.’ According to the University of Tulsa website, two programs — the National Science Foundation’s Federal Cyber Service: Scholarship for Service and the Department of Defense’s (DOD’s) Information Assurance Scholarship Program — provide scholarships to Cyber Corps students.”

Source: Cyber Corps Program Trains Spies For the Digital Age, In Oklahoma

The New Series of Doctor Who: Fleeing From Format?

November 16th, 2012 11:43 admin View Comments

Sci-Fi

An anonymous reader sends in this thoughtful article about the format of Doctor Who: “The New Series has given itself two basic tasks. One, to put back and keep on our screens a program by the name of Doctor Who that maintains substantial visible continuity with the classic series in many ways. Two, and this is where conflicting elements start to come in, to seek to define this resurrected program against many aspects of the classic series, even fundamental aspects, in pursuit of task one. In itself this is neither good nor bad. If anything it is on balance probably a good thing to seek to redress the shortcomings of the classic series, but what matters, ultimately, is the choices involved and their execution.”

Source: The New Series of Doctor Who: Fleeing From Format?

US Air Force Scraps ERP Project After $1 Billion Spent

November 14th, 2012 11:27 admin View Comments

Software

angry tapir writes “The U.S. Air Force has decided to scrap a major ERP (enterprise resource planning) software project after spending $1 billion, concluding that finishing it would cost far too much more money for too little gain. Dubbed the Expeditionary Combat Support System (ECSS), the project has racked up $1.03 billion in costs since 2005, ‘and has not yielded any significant military capability,’ an Air Force spokesman said in a statement. ‘We estimate it would require an additional $1.1B for about a quarter of the original scope to continue and fielding would not be until 2020. The Air Force has concluded the ECSS program is no longer a viable option for meeting the FY17 Financial Improvement and Audit Readiness (FIAR) statutory requirement. Therefore, we are canceling the program and moving forward with other options in order to meet both requirements.’”

Source: US Air Force Scraps ERP Project After $1 Billion Spent

US Air Force Scraps ERP Project After $1 Billion Spent

November 14th, 2012 11:27 admin View Comments

Software

angry tapir writes “The U.S. Air Force has decided to scrap a major ERP (enterprise resource planning) software project after spending $1 billion, concluding that finishing it would cost far too much more money for too little gain. Dubbed the Expeditionary Combat Support System (ECSS), the project has racked up $1.03 billion in costs since 2005, ‘and has not yielded any significant military capability,’ an Air Force spokesman said in a statement. ‘We estimate it would require an additional $1.1B for about a quarter of the original scope to continue and fielding would not be until 2020. The Air Force has concluded the ECSS program is no longer a viable option for meeting the FY17 Financial Improvement and Audit Readiness (FIAR) statutory requirement. Therefore, we are canceling the program and moving forward with other options in order to meet both requirements.’”

Source: US Air Force Scraps ERP Project After $1 Billion Spent

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