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Posts Tagged ‘phase change memory’

Diamonds Used To Increase Density, Performance of Phase-Change Memory

May 5th, 2012 05:37 admin View Comments

Data Storage

Lucas123 writes “Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have shown they can increase the density, performance and the durability of phase-change memory (PSM) by using diamonds to change the base alloy material. Instead of using the more typical method of applying heat to the alloy to change its state from amorphous to crystalline, thereby laying down bits in the material, the researchers used pressure from diamond-tipped tools. Using pressure versus heat allowed them to slow down the change in order to produce many varying states allowing more data to be stored on the alloy. ‘This phase-change memory is more stable than the material used in current flash drives. It works 100 times faster and is rewritable millions of times,’ said the study’s lead author, Ming Xu, a doctoral student at the Whiting School of Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. ‘Within about five years, it could also be used to replace hard drives in computers and give them more memory.’”

Source: Diamonds Used To Increase Density, Performance of Phase-Change Memory

IBM Creates Multi-Bit Phase Change Memory

June 30th, 2011 06:01 admin View Comments

IBM

Lucas123 writes “In what is likely to be a strong rival to NAND flash memory, IBM today announced it has been able to successfully store more than one bit of data per cell in a more stable non-volatile memory called phase-change memory (PCM). Unlike NAND, Previously, PCM couldn’t contend with flash because of its low capacity points. PCM does not require that data be erased before new data is written to it, which reduces a write amplification or wear out and it has 100 times the write performance of flash. IBM researchers say they plan to license the technology to memory manufacturers instead of producing it themselves.”

Source: IBM Creates Multi-Bit Phase Change Memory

Phase Change Memory Points To Future of Storage

June 3rd, 2011 06:48 admin View Comments

Data Storage

An anonymous reader writes “A UC San Diego team is about to demonstrate a solid state storage device that it says provides performance thousands of times faster than a conventional hard drive and up to seven times faster than current state-of-the-art solid-state drives. The drive uses first-of-its-kind phase-change memory, which stores data in the crystal structure of a metal alloy called a chalcogenide. To store data, the PCM chips switch the alloy between a crystalline and amorphous state based on the application of heat through an electrical current. To read the data, the chips use a smaller current to determine which state the chalcogenide is in.”

Source: Phase Change Memory Points To Future of Storage

Samsung To Ship Chip Package With Phase-Change Memory

April 29th, 2010 04:46 admin View Comments

angry tapir writes “Samsung Electronics will ship a multichip package later this quarter for smartphones that will include phase-change memory (PCM), an emerging technology that could ultimately replace memory types like NOR flash. Samsung’s announcement is significant because it marks the first PCM product to be available as part of a multichip package. PCM uses a glass-like material that can change from multiple states to crystalline forms as its atoms are rearranged.”

Source: Samsung To Ship Chip Package With Phase-Change Memory

Phase Change Memory vs. Storage As We Know It

December 31st, 2009 12:24 admin View Comments

storagedude writes “Access to data isn’t keeping pace with advances in CPU and memory, creating an I/O bottleneck that threatens to make data storage irrelevant. The author sees phase change memory as a technology that could unseat storage networks. From the article: ‘While years away, PCM has the potential to move data storage and storage networks from the center of data centers to the periphery. I/O would only have to be conducted at the start and end of the day, with data parked in memory while applications are running. In short, disk becomes the new tape.”

Source: Phase Change Memory vs. Storage As We Know It

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