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Posts Tagged ‘open source project’

The Shumway Open SWF Runtime Project

November 12th, 2012 11:27 admin View Comments

Firefox

theweatherelectric writes “Mozilla is looking for contributors interested in working on Shumway. Mozilla’s Jet Villegas writes, ‘Shumway is an experimental web-native (Javascript) runtime implementation of the SWF file format. It is developed as a free and open source project sponsored by Mozilla Research. The project has two main goals: 1. Advance the open web platform to securely process rich media formats that were previously only available in closed and proprietary implementations. 2. Offer a runtime processor for SWF and other rich media formats on platforms for which runtime implementations are not available.’” See also: Gnash and Lightspark.

Source: The Shumway Open SWF Runtime Project

The Shumway Open SWF Runtime Project

November 12th, 2012 11:27 admin View Comments

Firefox

theweatherelectric writes “Mozilla is looking for contributors interested in working on Shumway. Mozilla’s Jet Villegas writes, ‘Shumway is an experimental web-native (Javascript) runtime implementation of the SWF file format. It is developed as a free and open source project sponsored by Mozilla Research. The project has two main goals: 1. Advance the open web platform to securely process rich media formats that were previously only available in closed and proprietary implementations. 2. Offer a runtime processor for SWF and other rich media formats on platforms for which runtime implementations are not available.’” See also: Gnash and Lightspark.

Source: The Shumway Open SWF Runtime Project

What Developers Can Learn From Anonymous

August 27th, 2012 08:46 admin View Comments

Programming

snydeq writes “Regardless of where you stand on Anonymous’ tactics, politics, or whatever, I think the group has something to teach developers and development organizations,’ writes Andrew Oliver. ‘As leader of an open source project, I can revoke committer access for anyone who misbehaves, but membership in Anonymous is a free-for-all. Sure, doing something in Anonymous’ name that even a minority of “members” dislike would probably be a tactical mistake, but Anonymous has no trademark protection under the law; the organization simply has an overall vision and flavor. Its members carry out acts based on that mission. And it has enjoyed a great deal of success — in part due to the lack of central control. Compare this to the level of control in many corporate development organizations. Some of that control is necessary, but often it’s taken to gratuitous lengths. If you hire great developers, set general goals for the various parts of the project, and collect metrics, you probably don’t need to exercise a lot of control to meet your requirements.”

Source: What Developers Can Learn From Anonymous

The Rise of the Programmable Data Center

August 3rd, 2012 08:05 admin View Comments

IT

As data centers become more common and more advanced, there’s been a movement to automate and consolidate control of data center components, and an industry is starting to grow around it. “While VMware pushes a programmable data model based on its technologies, vendors such as Puppet Labs are making the case for a more platform-neutral approach. Puppet Labs has developed a declarative language for configuring systems that can be extended across the data center: the organization recently announced the creation of an open source project in conjunction with EMC, called Razor, to accomplish that goal. There’s already open source project known as Chef, created by Opscode, with a similar set of goals. In a similar vein, Reflex Systems, a provider of virtualization management tools, is trying to drum interest in VQL, a query language that the company specifically developed for IT pros.”

Source: The Rise of the Programmable Data Center

ESA Summer of Code In Space 2012

July 19th, 2012 07:23 admin View Comments

Programming

phyr writes “The European Space Agency is looking for student coders to join the Summer of Code in Space. ESA will pay 4000 Euros to each student for contributing to a space related open source project for the summer. Accepted student applicants are paired with a mentor from the participating projects, thus gaining exposure to real-world software development scenarios. Mentor organizations have been selected. Students now have until July 27 to submit their applications. Check out the ideas pages of each project such as for the NEST SAR Toolbox

Source: ESA Summer of Code In Space 2012

JavaScript For the Rest of Us

July 19th, 2012 07:10 admin View Comments

Programming

First time accepted submitter my2iu writes “The JavaScript programming language is both widely available and very powerful. Unfortunately, since only 6% of the world’s population are native English speakers, the other 94% of the world are forced to learn English before they can start using JavaScript. Babylscript is an open source project that aims to translate JavaScript to all the world’s languages, including French, Spanish, Chinese, and Arabic. The project has recently completed its 12th translation, enough so that the native languages of over 50% of the world’s population are now supported!”

Source: JavaScript For the Rest of Us

The Death of an HTML5 Game Breeds an Open Source Project

June 22nd, 2012 06:17 admin View Comments

Facebook

colinneagle writes “German social gaming company Wooga has thrown in the towel on its HTML5 project after seeing little return on the increasing amount of effort put into its Magic Land Island game. Some early success convinced Wooga to devote additional resources to the game, which was launched in October of last year. However, ‘As the project continued to progress, so did the industry. Whilst the benefits of an open platform future are clear for games developers, it became clear halfway through Magic Land Island’s development cycle that the technology wasn’t yet ready for mainstream exposure.’ The announcement sheds some interesting light on HTML5, as Wooga hardly holds back on any of the details behind the game’s failure. The biggest barriers to HTML5′s entry to the mainstream include internet connectivity and limitations on sound. The consensus? The time for HTML5 will come; it’s just not quite there yet. In the meantime, Wooga has made the game open source so other HTML5 developers can learn from it.”

Source: The Death of an HTML5 Game Breeds an Open Source Project

VMware’s Serengeti Brings Hadoop To Virtual, Cloud Environments

June 13th, 2012 06:16 admin View Comments

Cloud

Nerval’s Lobster writes “VMware’s Serengeti is a new open-source project for deploying Apache Hadoop in virtual and cloud environments. Serengeti 0.5 is available as a free download under the Apache 2.0 license. It has been designed as distro-neutral, with support for Apache 1.0, CDH3, Hortonworks 1.0 and Greenplum HD 1.0. Of course, VMware isn’t the only company seeking to leverage the increased interest in Hadoop. In June alone, midsize IT vendors such as Datameer, Karmasphere, and Hortonworks have all announced platforms that utilize the framework in some way. Research firm IDC recently predicted that worldwide revenues from Hadoop and MapReduce will hit $812.8 million in 2016, up from $77 million in 2011.”

Source: VMware’s Serengeti Brings Hadoop To Virtual, Cloud Environments

Linaro Tweaks Speed Up Android, By Up To 100 Percent

June 10th, 2012 06:17 admin View Comments

Android

Argon writes with an excerpt from Liliputing of interest to Android users: “‘The folks behind the Linaro open source software project have put a little time into tweaking Google Android to use the gcc 4.7 toolchain. The result is a version of Android that can perform many tasks between 30 and 100 percent faster than the version of Android Google 4.0 Google currently offers through the AOSP (Android Open Source Project).’ Adds Argon: “Note that there are CPU optimizations only since they have only access to binary blobs for GPU code.”

Source: Linaro Tweaks Speed Up Android, By Up To 100 Percent

Is OpenStack the New Linux?

June 7th, 2012 06:58 admin View Comments

Cloud

snydeq writes “As the self-proclaimed ‘cloud OS for the datacenter,’ OpenStack is fast becoming one of the more intriguing movements in open source — complete with lofty ambitions, community in-fighting, and commercial appeal. But questions remain whether this project can reach its potential of becoming the new Linux. ‘The allure of OpenStack is clear: Like Linux, OpenStack aims to provide a kernel around which all kinds of software vendors can build businesses. But with OpenStack, we’re talking multiple projects to provide agile cloud management of compute, storage, and networking resources across the data center — plus authentication, self-service, resource monitoring, and a slew of other projects. It’s hugely ambitious, perhaps the most far-reaching open source project ever, although still at a very early stage. … Clearly, the sky-high aspirations of OpenStack both fuel its outrageous momentum and incur the risk of overreach and collapse, as it incites all manner of competition. The promise is big, but the success of OpenStack is by no means assured.’”

Source: Is OpenStack the New Linux?

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