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Posts Tagged ‘note’

LG Seeks Sales Ban of Samsung Galaxy Tablet In Korea

December 28th, 2012 12:48 admin View Comments

Patents

Dupple writes “According to the Dow Jones News Wires, LG has filed an injunction in its home territory of South Korea, seeking to ban the sale of the Galaxy Note 10.1, alleging the panels inside the tablet infringe LG patents. The injunction follows a lawsuit filed by Samsung on 7 December, which alleged that LG infringed seven of Samsung’s liquid crystal display patents. LG, which filed the injunction with the Seoul District Court on Wednesday, is aiming to block the sales of the Galaxy Note 10.1 tablet computer.”

Source: LG Seeks Sales Ban of Samsung Galaxy Tablet In Korea

Has 3D Film-Making Had Its Day?

December 25th, 2012 12:46 admin View Comments

Movies

dryriver sends this hopeful note from the BBC: “‘It’s three years since audiences around the world swarmed into cinemas to see James Cameron’s Avatar. It rapidly became the biggest grossing film of all time, in part because of its ground-breaking digital 3D technology. But, in retrospect, Avatar now seems the high-point of 3D movie-making, with little since 2009 to challenge its achievement. Three years on, has the appeal of 3D gone flat? Nic Knowland has been a respected director of photography in Britain for 30 years. He’s seen cinema trends and fads come and go, but never one for which he’s had so little enthusiasm as 3D. ‘From the cinematographer’s perspective it may offer production value and scale to certain kinds of film. But for many movies it offers only distraction and some fairly uncomfortable viewing experiences for the audience. I haven’t yet encountered a director of photography who’s genuinely enthusiastic about it.’”

Source: Has 3D Film-Making Had Its Day?

Will Tablets Kill Off e-Readers?

December 14th, 2012 12:34 admin View Comments

Books

Nerval’s Lobster writes “Are e-readers doomed? A research note earlier this week from IHS iSuppli suggested that, after years of solid growth, the e-book reader market was ‘on an alarmingly precipitous decline’ thanks to the rise of tablets. The firm suggested that e-reader sales had declined from 23.2 million units in 2011 to 14.9 million this year — around 36 percent, in other words. The note blames tablets: ‘Single-task devices like the ebook are being replaced without remorse in the lives of consumers by their multifunction equivalents, in this case by media tablets.’ Even Amazon and Barnes & Noble, the reigning champs of the e-reader marketplace, have increasingly embraced full-color tablets as the best medium for selling their digital products. Backed by enormous cloud-based libraries that offer far more than just e-books, these devices are altogether more versatile than grayscale e-readers, provided their users want to do more than just read plain text.”

Source: Will Tablets Kill Off e-Readers?

Will Tablets Kill Off e-Readers?

December 14th, 2012 12:34 admin View Comments

Books

Nerval’s Lobster writes “Are e-readers doomed? A research note earlier this week from IHS iSuppli suggested that, after years of solid growth, the e-book reader market was ‘on an alarmingly precipitous decline’ thanks to the rise of tablets. The firm suggested that e-reader sales had declined from 23.2 million units in 2011 to 14.9 million this year — around 36 percent, in other words. The note blames tablets: ‘Single-task devices like the ebook are being replaced without remorse in the lives of consumers by their multifunction equivalents, in this case by media tablets.’ Even Amazon and Barnes & Noble, the reigning champs of the e-reader marketplace, have increasingly embraced full-color tablets as the best medium for selling their digital products. Backed by enormous cloud-based libraries that offer far more than just e-books, these devices are altogether more versatile than grayscale e-readers, provided their users want to do more than just read plain text.”

Source: Will Tablets Kill Off e-Readers?

AMD64 Surpasses i386 As Debian’s Most Popular Architecture

September 5th, 2012 09:21 admin View Comments

Debian

An anonymous reader writes with a quick note about the changing tides of computer architecture. From the article: “Bill Allombert announced today [now yesterday] via the Debian-devel mailing list that the X86_64 version of Debian has now surpassed all of the other supported architectures by a narrow margin. The most surprising part of this announcement however, and accompanying info-graphics provided on the Debian Popularity Contest page, is that this was not already true.”

Source: AMD64 Surpasses i386 As Debian’s Most Popular Architecture

White House Pulls Down TSA Petition

August 12th, 2012 08:38 admin View Comments

Privacy

Jeremiah Cornelius writes with a note that on Thursday of this week “The Electronic Privacy Information Center posted a brief and detailed notice about the removal of a petition regarding security screenings by the TSA at US airports and other locations. ‘At approximately 11:30 am EDT, the White House removed a petition about the TSA airport screening procedures from the White House ‘We the People’ website. About 22,500 of the 25,000 signatures necessary for a response from the Administration were obtained when the White House unexpectedly cut short the time period for the petition. The site also went down for ‘maintenance’ following an article in Wired that sought support for the campaign.”

Source: White House Pulls Down TSA Petition

Drafts for iPhone: Write First, Then Act

April 12th, 2012 04:30 admin View Comments

drafts150.jpgDrafts is a new starting point for typing anything on an iPhone. Every time you launch the app, there’s a blank note ready. You can jot down a tweet, an email or a note immediately, and then send it to the right place. There’s no need to worry about file names or folders. It’s just the fastest way to capture text. It might solve problems you don’t even know you have.

Here’s the problem with apps: They create too many different ways to do the same thing. When you want to do something basic like write a short note, you have to take another step. “I want to write a note. Okay, which app should I use?” That step takes up time and brainpower, distracting you from what you’re trying to do.

And what if the app you want is on another page or buried in a folder? What if you launch one app and then change your mind and decide to use another? The iOS home screen looks like a physical thing, a board with big buttons on it. That makes it intuitive, but it can also be limiting. The “badges-on-a-table” metaphor of iOS can waste a few seconds at a time on these decisions, and those add up.

Fortunately, it’s possible for app developers to work around this problem using URLs to create links integrating each other’s apps. Greg Pierce, president of the independent iOS app shop Agile Tortoise, loves this challenge. When developing his first app, the popular dictionary Terminology, he worked with Marco Arment to develop the x-callback-url specification. This allowed Instapaper users to look up words in Terminology, and it standardized a way for developers to build all kinds of integrations.

The latest Agile Tortoise app, Drafts for iPhone, solves the badges-on-a-table problem for text, one of the most fundamental ways we use our phones.

Write, Then Act

draftsiphone01.jpgFor an action the length of a note (or a tweet), there’s no faster way to get it out than through this app. It launches to a new, blank note each time. Drafts saves your notes in a list, and they can be found quickly with full-text search. As you’re writing, you can also check definitions through integration with the iPhone version of Terminology.

“I wanted it to be text-centric, not file-centric,” Pierce said. “No filenames or titles, no folders to think about… and also no lists to start with. If I’ve got something to say, I don’t want to have to think about where to put it first.”

If you write in Markdown, Drafts has even more goodies. You can preview your formatted notes and copy or email your Markdown as HTML straight from the action menu. And whether you like a monospaced font, serif or sans, or you want different color options, there are a few themes to choose from for Drafts’ basic interface to make sure your writing environment is just right.

Now that your note is out of your head, you can relax and decide what to do with it. That’s where the action menu comes in. In version 1.0, you can tweet a note with one tap from any of your Twitter accounts. If you don’t want to use the built-in iOS 5 Twitter function, you can send it to Tweetbot or the Twitter app. You can email a note or copy it to the clipboard.

Version 1.0.1, which is already under review by Apple, will add sending to the popular task managers OmniFocus and Things. In a few weeks, for version 1.0.2, Drafts will get ‘Send to Dropbox,’ and that addresses one of the most prominent concerns.

Sending vs. Syncing

draftsiphone1.jpgThere’s a crowded world of text editors available for iOS, and syncing has become a requirement. The whole advantage of writing with thumbs on a connected device is that you can sync effortlessly with your computer and pick up from there later. Some apps have incorporated iCloud sync, which saves your work inside the app you used and syncs between, iPhone, iPad and Mac versions.

But Dropbox is the real workhorse: It’s cross-platform, it appears in your computer’s regular file system and any app can access it. For plain text in particular, Dropbox is key to working flexibly.

I admit, I panicked when I saw that Drafts didn’t have Dropbox sync. I would have to keep two text apps on my home screen, so I could paste Drafts notes into Byword and sync them. That seemed inconvenient until I started using it.

I found that I didn’t need to sync most of these notes. They were just thoughts I wanted to capture quickly. I could decide what to do with them – if anything – later. It’s easy enough to copy and paste them into a more permanent place. But when the ‘Send to Dropbox’ action arrives in Drafts 1.0.2, it will be even easier. I don’t actually want to sync some of my notes, but I’ll soon be able to sync the ones I need with one tap.

It Scratches An Itch

draftsiphone3.jpg“It really was an app I built to scratch an itch,” Pierce said. “There were a few of those things, most particularly having a quick and easy way to tweet and/or email without getting bogged down in a timeline or inbox, that drove me to do it. I wanted it to be quick, in-and-out for jotting things down, and give me a decent set of ways to output that text elsewhere.”

Pierce was not the only one with that itch. It took him by surprise. “I thought it might be a little too niche to interest a broad audience,” he said. “I honestly am somewhat overwhelmed by the attention Drafts has gotten.” That’s a good problem for an independent developer to have.

You can scratch your itch for $0.99 on the iTunes App Store, and you can check out the other Agile Tortoise apps at agiletortoise.com.

Source: Drafts for iPhone: Write First, Then Act

Apple To Add 3600 Jobs At New $304 Million Campus In Austin

March 10th, 2012 03:58 admin View Comments

Apple

An anonymous reader links to a short note at Tech Newest, according to which “Apple Inc. plans to create a $304 million campus in Austin, Texas, which will add 3,600 jobs over the next decade, more than doubling its labourforce in the city. The Cupertino, California, customer device huge already employs thousands in Austin, whose tasks include handling customer issues and support.”

Source: Apple To Add 3600 Jobs At New $304 Million Campus In Austin

10 Tips for Using Evernote Effectively

February 21st, 2012 02:06 admin View Comments

evernote.pngEvernote is a tool for keeping track of, well, everything. At least everything as far as digital information goes, or information that can be digitized. Evernote comprises a Web-based service and clients for Windows, Mac OS X, mobile devices, and extensions for Web browsers. It’s a service I’ve been using for years, and over that time I’ve picked up a few tips and tricks for getting the most out of the tool.

Learn the Shortcuts

If you’re using Evernote on the desktop, you’ll want to start by learning the keyboard shortcuts. With Evernote, you can assign a couple of shortcuts to create a new note without leaving whatever application you happen to be using. For example, on Mac OS X, the Cmd-Ctrl-N shortcut (Ctrl-Alt-N on Windows) will create a new note from any application.

Evernote-Preferences.png

If you have something in the clipboard you want to create a note from, you can use Cmd-Ctrl-V to start a new note with whatever’s in the system clipboard. That’s Ctrl-Alt-V if you’re using Windows.

Want to search for something that’s in Evernote? A quick Cmd-Ctrl-E will bring Evernote to the foreground and let you search immediately. If you’re on Windows, that’s Shift-Win-F.

The Evernote Web site has a full list of Windows shortcuts and Mac shortcuts.

Use Evernote as an Address Book and Contact Manager

I’ve yet to find a contact manager/address book that I actually like, whether it’s Web-based or native desktop software.

For people I keep in close touch with (co-workers, family, friends) I use my phone’s address book and sync with my computer. But there’s a lot of people I touch base with less frequently (sources, PR people, potential clients) that I’d rather not clutter my address book with.

To fill the gap, I’ve managed to use Evernote pretty successfully for keeping track of contact information and conversations. I use a Contacts folder and tag messages with keywords that will help me remember context later on. For example, in booking interviews for the upcoming Strata conference I tag correspondence and notes with “stata” and “big data” plus company names or general product categories (like “Hadoop”).

You can also use Evernote to keep track of business cards. Scan in business cards and save them to Evernote, and once they’re synced Evernote will use character recognition on the cards. This means you’ll usually be able to find someone’s contact information via their business card without needing to re-type it.

I have hopes that Evernote will become even better suited for contact management once they’ve refined the Hello App that was introduced in December of last year.

Put Notes in the Favorites Bar

Have something you refer to often, like a sales sheet or maybe the Markdown syntax? Create a note and it to the Evernote Favorites Bar.

If you’re using the desktop client on Windows or Mac, you should have a Favorites Bar that’s sort of like the bookmark bar in Chrome or Firefox. It comes pre-populated with several defaults, like all files that are created from Web clips or all notes that have file attachments.

You can create new favorites by dragging a note, folder or tag to the Favorites Bar. Simple, no? One caveat, though – this feature is only in Windows or Mac OS X 10.7 or later. For some reason, the Favorites Bar doesn’t appear in earlier versions of Mac OS X.

Local Folders

In some cases you may want to use Evernote, without uploading your data to Evernote. This might be because you have huge files that would put you over quota, or because you have sensitive files that shouldn’t be stored elsewhere. Whatever the reason, you can create a local folder for Evernote that won’t be synced.

When creating a new folder, the default is for a synced folder. But if you choose “Local Notebook” instead of “Synchronized Notebook,” your new folder won’t be counted against your quota. Of course, it also won’t be available via Evernote’s Web service or synced with your other clients if you’re using Evernote on mobile devices or other computers.

Note that you can’t change the notebook type after you’ve created it, but you can easily copy notes between folders. So there’s not much lost in creating a notebook as a local one instead of synced if you have any doubts about wanting to sync it with Evernote’s servers.

Next page: Shared Folders and More

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Source: 10 Tips for Using Evernote Effectively

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Inspector General Investigated For Muzzling Inconvenient Science

September 17th, 2011 09:50 admin View Comments

Science

Layzej writes “Federal biologist Charles Monnett was placed on administrative leave July 18 pending final results of an inspector general’s investigation into integrity issues. The investigation originally focused on a 2006 note published in Polar Biology based on a unique observation of four dead polar bears. The investigators acknowledged that they had no formal training in science, but later demonstrated a complete misunderstanding of science, the peer review process, and at times basic math with questions like ‘seven of what number is 11 percent?’ They also expressed concern over the fact that the note was reviewed by Monnett’s wife prior to submitting the paper for peer review. When nothing turned up, the investigation turned towards Monnett’s role in administering research contracts. But documents released by PEER, a watchdog and whistle-blower protection group, suggest even that investigation is off base. Monnett has since been reinstated, albeit in a different position. Now the IG handling of this case is itself under investigation following a PEER complaint that the IG is violating new Interior Department scientific integrity rules.”

Source: Inspector General Investigated For Muzzling Inconvenient Science

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