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Posts Tagged ‘Nolan Bushnell’

Atari Turns 40 Today

June 27th, 2012 06:15 admin View Comments

Games

harrymcc writes “On June 27, 1972, a startup called Atari filed its papers of incorporation. A few months later, it released its first game, Pong. The rest is video game history. I celebrated the anniversary over at TIME.com by chatting with the company’s indomitable founder, Nolan Bushnell. From the article: ‘Like everyone else who grew up in the 1970s and 1980s, I played them all: Pong, Breakout, Asteroids, Centipede, Millipede, Battlezone, Pole Position, Crystal Castles and my eternal favorite, Tempest. The first computer I bought with my own money was an Atari 400. So when I chatted with Bushnell this week to mark Atari’s 40th anniversary, I felt like I was talking with a man who helped invent my childhood.’” I spent my fair share of time playing Warlords with friends on my 2600.

Source: Atari Turns 40 Today

Atari Wants To Reinvent Pong

March 17th, 2012 03:57 admin View Comments

Classic Games (Games)

mikejuk writes “Atari is offering up to $100,000 in a contest for a new version of Pong, the classic game that launched video games 40 years ago, for the iPhone/iPad/iPod Touch. The judges for the contest include Nolan Bushnell, founder of Atari, who came up with the original idea for Pong. So, what does a 21st century Pong look like? How does it play? And what role does touch have in this, the simplest of games?”

Source: Atari Wants To Reinvent Pong

Looking Back At Dungeons & Dragons

January 20th, 2010 01:28 admin View Comments

An anonymous reader sends in a nostalgic piece about Dungeons & Dragons and the influence it’s had on games and gamers for the past 36 years. Quoting:
“Maybe there was something in the air during the early ’70s. Maybe it was historically inevitable. But it seems way more than convenient coincidence that Gygax and Arneson got their first packet of rules for D&D out the door in 1974, the same year Nolan Bushnell managed to cobble together a little arcade machine called Pong. We’ve never had fun quite the same way since. Looking back, these two events set today’s world of gaming into motion — the Romulus and Remus of modern game civilization. For the rest of forever, we would sit around and argue whether games should let us do more or tell us better stories.”

Source: Looking Back At Dungeons & Dragons

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