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Posts Tagged ‘node’

Arduino and MK802 Robot, Controlled By Phone

December 22nd, 2012 12:18 admin View Comments

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beefsack writes “An engineer by the name of Andrej Skraba has combined an Arduino board and an MK802 mini PC running Ubuntu to create a robot which is controllable via it’s own node.js server and a mobile phone. Seen by some as products competing in a similar space, Andrej shows how the two devices can make the most of their unique features to complement each other well working together.”

Source: Arduino and MK802 Robot, Controlled By Phone

TSMC and Global Foundries Plan Risky Process Jump As Intel Unveils 22nm SoC

December 10th, 2012 12:10 admin View Comments

Intel

MrSeb writes with news on the happenings with next generation fabrication processes. From the article: “… Intel’s 22nm SoC unveil is important for a host of reasons. As process nodes shrink and more components move on-die, the characteristics of each new node have become particularly important. 22nm isn’t a new node for Intel; it debuted the technology last year with Ivy Bridge, but SoCs are more complex than CPU designs and create their own set of challenges. Like its 22nm Ivy Bridge CPUs, the upcoming 22nm SoCs rely on Intel’s Tri-Gate implementation of FinFET technology. According to Intel engineer Mark Bohr, the 3D transistor structure is the principle reason why the company’s 22nm technology is as strong as it is. Earlier this year, we brought you news that Nvidia was deeply concerned about manufacturing economics and the relative strength of TSMC’s sub-28nm planar roadmap. Morris Chang, TSMC’s CEO, has since admitted that such concerns are valid, given that performance and power are only expected to increase by 20-25% as compared to 28nm. The challenge for both TSMC and GlobalFoundries is going to be how to match the performance of Intel’s 22nm technology with their own 28nm products. 20nm looks like it won’t be able to do so, which is why both companies are emphasizing their plans to move to 16nm/14nm ahead of schedule. There’s some variation on which node comes next; both GlobalFoundries and Intel are talking up 14nm; TSMC is implying a quick jump to 16nm. Will it work? Unknown. TSMC and GlobalFoundries both have excellent engineers, but FinFET is a difficult technology to deploy. Ramping it up more quickly than expected while simultaneously bringing up a new process may be more difficult than either company anticipates.”

Source: TSMC and Global Foundries Plan Risky Process Jump As Intel Unveils 22nm SoC

Book Review: Sams Teach Yourself Node.js In 24 Hours

December 10th, 2012 12:25 admin View Comments

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Michael Ross writes “Since its introduction in 1994, JavaScript has largely been utilized within web browsers, which limited JavaScript programmers to client-side development. Yet with the recent introduction of Node.js, those programmers can leverage their skills and experience for server-side efforts. Node.js is an event-based framework for creating network applications — particularly those for the Web. Anyone interested in learning this relatively new technology can begin with one of numerous resources, including Sams Teach Yourself Node.js in 24 Hours.” Keep reading for the rest of Michael’s review.

Sams Teach Yourself Node.js in 24 Hours
author George Ornbo
pages 464 pages
publisher Sams Publishing
rating 7/10
reviewer Michael J. Ross
ISBN 978-0672335952
summary An introduction to the Node.js framework.

Source: Book Review: Sams Teach Yourself Node.js In 24 Hours

Raided For Running a Tor Exit Node

November 30th, 2012 11:52 admin View Comments

Censorship

An anonymous reader writes A Tor Exit node owner is being prosecuted in Austria. As part of the prosecution, all of his electronics have been held by the authorities, including over 20 computers, his cell phone and hard disks. ‘During interview with police later on Wednesday, Weber said there was a “more friendly environment” once investigators understood the Polish server that transmitted the illegal images was used by Tor participants rather than by Weber himself. But he said he still faces the possibility of serious criminal penalties and the possibility of a precedent that Tor operators can be held liable if he’s convicted.’ This brings up the question: What backup plan, if any, should the average nerd have for something like this?”

Source: Raided For Running a Tor Exit Node

NASA DTN Protocol: How Interplanetary Internet Works

November 11th, 2012 11:10 admin View Comments

ISS

First time accepted submitter GinaSmith888 writes “This is a deep dive in the BP protocol Vint Cerf developed that is the heart of NASA’s Delay-Tolerant Networking, better known as DTN. From the article: ‘The big difference between BP and IP is that, while IP assumes a more or less smooth pathway for packets going from start to end point, BP allows for disconnections, glitches and other problems you see commonly in deep space, Younes said. Basically, a BP network — the one that will the Interplanetary Internet possible — moves data packets in bursts from node to node, so that it can check when the next node is available or up.’”

Source: NASA DTN Protocol: How Interplanetary Internet Works

The 6 Best Ways to Run Microsoft’s .NET in the Cloud

June 12th, 2012 06:30 admin View Comments

In programming circles, there’s been a steady emphasis on platforms that support Ruby, Python and Node.js – and not as much attention paid to Microsoft .NET platform providers. That’s a real oversight given the enduring popularity of Microsoft languages.

For example, since Heroku was acquired by Salesforce.com in 2010, it has become the poster child of platform-as-a-service (PaaS) providers. Whenever a new PaaS launches, it gets called “the Heroku of X.” Before that, the comparison of choice was Google App Engine. Those honors are somewhat deserved, since those two services did practically invent the PaaS category as we know it.

But the .NET platform remains important, so let’s take a look at the options for running .NET applications in the cloud.

Windows Azure

Microsoft Windows Azure has been getting more attention lately for its efforts in open source than for its roots as a .NET PaaS. Microsoft has made PHP a first-class citizen on Azure, and has been porting Node.js to Windows specifically so it can run in the Azure environment. And last week’s announcement of Linux support on Azure infrastructure-as-a-service makes the fact that it can still run .NET applications almost an afterthought. Still, with “tens of thousands” of users and the legacy of being the service from the company that invented .NET, Azure remains the most obvious choice for a public .NET PaaS. But there are, of course, other options.

Tier 3

Tier 3, which launched in 2006, was originally an Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) provider, but it added a PaaS service called Web Fabric last month. Tier 3 also develops a fork of VMware’s PaaS Cloud Foundry called Iron Foundry, which adds support for .NET to the existing open source platform and can be used for private clouds. Web Fabric is still relatively new, but it’s based on an open source platform. By building on Cloud Foundry, Tier 3 has created a polyglot platform that supports all the languages the original projects support, including Java, Ruby and Node.js. You can find the source code on Github.

AppHarbor

AppHarbor, which launched last year, is a slightly more established public .NET PaaS running on Amazon Web Services infrastructure with support for Git, (including Github for Windows) and Mercurial. One big differentiator for the company is the built-in support for unit tests. Developers just upload their code, and any unit tests included are automatically run.

“Generally most of the PaaS environments run in a way that you could add that capability, but it is a lot of work,” Tier 3 developer and PaaS enthusiast Adron Hall told ReadWriteWeb via email. “With AppHarbor a developer doesn’t even need to click a button to turn it on. I’m personally a HUGE fan of the fact that they do this.”

Uhuru

Uhuru is another newcomer, founded by former Microsoft executives. Like Tier 3, the company is running its own Cloud Foundry-based .NET PaaS called Uhuru.NET Services for Cloud Foundry. The source is on Github.

Apprenda

Apprenda was probably the first private .NET PaaS and sells a proprietary enterprise version along with a free-as-in-beer “express” version. In addition to running as a private PaaS, Apprenda can sync with Azure to enable a hybrid cloud environment.

Moncai

As of this writing Moncai hasn’t launched yet, but it does have a beta invite sign-up. The company bills itself as a .Net/Mono PaaS with support for both Git and Mercurial. It’s the only PaaS we’re aware of with Mono support.

Disclosure: Apprenda, Heroku, Tier 3 and VMware Cloud Foundry are among the sponsors of DeployCon, which paid Klint Finley’s travel expenses to moderate a panel.

Source: The 6 Best Ways to Run Microsoft’s .NET in the Cloud

Van Jacobson Denies Averting Internet Meltdown In 1980s

May 26th, 2012 05:17 admin View Comments

The Internet

New submitter strangebush sends this quote from Wired about Van Jacobson’s work on the TCP/IP protocol in the ’80s, which helped stabilize early computer networks enough for them to eventually grow into the internet: “‘I was getting a bit per second between two network gateways that were literally in the same room,’ Jacobson remembers. … In 1985, Berkeley ran one of the IMPs, or interface message processors, that served as the main nodes on the ARPAnet, a network funded by the U.S. Department of Defense that connected various research institutions and government organizations across the country. The network was designed so that any node could send data at any time, but for some reason, Berkeley’s IMP was only sending data every twelve seconds. As it turns out, the IMP was waiting for other nodes to complete their transmissions before sending its data. The ARPAnet was meant to be a mesh network, where all nodes can operate on their own, but it was behaving like a token ring network, where each node can only send when they receive a master token. ‘Our IMP would just keep accumulating data and accumulating data for about twelve seconds and then it would dump it,’ says Jacobson. ‘It was like the old token ring networks when you couldn’t say anything until you got the token. But the ARPAnet wasn’t built to do that. There was no global protocol like that.’”

Source: Van Jacobson Denies Averting Internet Meltdown In 1980s

The Rise of Mobile Cloud Services: BaaS Startups Grow Up

April 17th, 2012 04:30 admin View Comments

shutterstock_clouds_150.jpg “Backend as a Service” (BaaS) companies provide easily integrated cloud-based backends for mobile app developers. Though not as well known as Software as a Service (SaaS), Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) or Platform as a Service (PaaS), the BaaS ecosystem has quickly evolved from a niche vertical into an important industry segment.

The industry segment took another step toward maturity this week with mobile development platform Appcelerator’s announcement of its Titanium 2.0 SDK, with significant backend cloud services tied into it. Meanwhile, Boston-based mobile cloud provider Kinvey also released its platform to the public.

Many a startup has seen this scenario play out: The company comes up with a great idea and starts to build it, only to see several other startups release the same idea at the same time. They battle with each other over user interfaces and feature sets even as the market they created booms, and more and more companies jump in. The ultimate winners may or may not be the companies that had the idea first.

This is exactly what’s happening in the sector for mobile development.

The standard bearer for the BaaS companies was StackMob, joined quickly by Parse, Kinvey and Cocoafish. There are now more than a dozen mobile cloud service providers across the world.

appcelerator_cocoafish_logo.jpg

Appcelerator Integrates Cocoafish

Appcelerator’s announcement comes in response to its quarterly report on the mobile industry – compiled with research firm IDC – which revealed that nearly 60% of Appcelerator’s developer partners wanted some kind of backend cloud functionality for their apps.

App developers’ need for such backend cloud functionality as push notifications and location services, photo and file sharing, user management, chat, ratings, and reviews, also justified the company’s purchase of Cocoafish earlier this year. In many ways, the IDC survey and Appcelerator’s movement into the space justify the existence of the entire industry segment.

appcelerator_q112_cloud.jpg

Image: Appcelerator/IDC Mobile Report – Q1 2012

Dubbed Appcelerator Cloud Services (ACS), the BaaS solution has been tied to the company’s development platform to be able to write apps with Titanium, Objective-C, Java, PhoneGap, Sencha and HTML5 (among similar services) for native, hybrid or mobile Web deployment.

What Appcelerator has done with Cocoafish is take a BaaS system and integrate it into its own Titanium SDK. Outside of tying Cocoafish to Titanium, though, there is little that the rebranded “ACS” has that other mobile cloud service providers do not already have.

ACS provides: user management, photo storing and sharing, rich location storage, social integration, custom data objects, push notifications, check-ins, status updates, chat, ratings, discussion forums, messaging templates, client (device) identification and unstructured storage.

Battle to Be the Best

kinvey_real_150x150.jpgAppcelerator Cloud Services is now a strong entrant into the BaaS ecosystem, but how does it stand up against the rest of the sector? Kinvey released its platform to the public this week and offers a strong suite of capabilities. With mobile cloud service companies popping up seemingly every month, there is a lot of competition in the space. It is difficult to ascertain which companies offer the fullest integration.

There are at least 19 companies that now focus on BaaS in one form or another:

Stackmob, Parse, Kinvey, Apple’s iCloud, RhoMobile, Appcelerator (Cocoafish), FeedHenry Astrum Space, Scotty App, Webmynd, YorAPI, CloudyRec, Applicasa, QuickBlox, mobDB, Netmera, Kumulos, CodeCloud.io, Sencha.io and Tiggzi.

There are also a couple of large companies that could move into this space very easily, including Amazon with its AWS products, Microsoft with its Azure Cloud, Google with App Engine, and Rackspace.

“From a technology perspective, the growth in the mobile ecosystem has created a brand-new development stack,” said Kinvey CEO Sravish Sridhar. “The old stack is dying. The new client stack has Objective-C (iOS), Java (Android), HTML5, Ruby and Node.js. On the business side, there is a shortage of mobile development skills because developers are learning how to build apps on the new mobile stack. When they’re doing this, they don’t want to also build or learn new backend systems. These technology and business drivers have made Backend as a Service platforms like Kinvey popular.”

Parse_150x150.jpgThe goal of each BaaS system is to provide basically the same set of functions to mobile developers. Yet some have broader goals while others focus on certain niches of the mobile development industry. For instance, iKnode calls itself a Backend as a Service provider, but it is designed specifically for .NET architecture, which will limit its broader appeal. CodeCloud.io is a hosted NodeJS and SQLite platform that gives it BaaS-like functionality but also provides a narrower scope.

There are a couple things to look for when determining the top BaaS providers. Foremost is REST API creation and management. REST (representational state transfer) is a software architecture for distributing media from a website (or in this case, a mobile app). Any BaaS provider worth its salt should have significant aptitude with REST APIs. The companies with the ability to create and manage REST APIs are StackMob, RhoMobile Parse, Kinvey, YorAPI (which calls itself an API as a Service), Apstrata and Netmera.

To further narrow the field, YorAPI CEO and founder Scott Ling identified the top functions for a BaaS provider:

  • User profiles with social login support for Facebook and Twitter
  • Custom data objects and storage
  • Analytics and metrics
  • Push notification support
  • Rich location data (Ling did not mention this specifically)

Not one of the BaaS startups does all of these things (or does them all well). Some companies focus on specific aspects, as YorAPI does with its API creation service or mobDB as a mobile app storage client. The best of the best in the BaaS ecosystem do more than just provide certain functions, but also look to be an entire end-to-end cloud service that can make app developers’ lives easier.

stackmob_functions.jpg

Image: StackMob features

“The top Backend as a Service providers are the ones solving the hard backend problems for developers. Scale across clouds, security of data in the backend and on the apps, managing users across identity spaces and flexibility to run custom business logic for your apps anywhere. It’s not just about being the data backend anymore. To succeed in Backend as a Service, you have to provide a full-feature backend solution,” said Sridhar.

This brings us back to the beginning. StackMob set the market for BaaS providers and the company is understandably proud of that. While it does not do location, its claim to be the “complete technology stack for your mobile apps” is not pure hyperbole. Parse and Kinvey both do location, notifications, profile management and analytics as well. While Appcelerator/Cocoafish does not specifically do location, it can analyze data from searchable fields with location being a part of that. Israel-based Applicasa also has a significant technology stack.

What is clear is that the startups that created the market and set it up to be copied by other companies across the globe are still the leaders in the space. They have had more time to work on what they offer, have refined their approach and will cement their status going forward.

Developers: Have you tried multiple BaaS providers? What is the easiest to use? What has the most nuanced features? Let us know in the comments.

Top image courtesy of Shutterstock.

Source: The Rise of Mobile Cloud Services: BaaS Startups Grow Up

Cloud9 IDE to Enable Node.js App Posting to Windows Azure Cloud

January 24th, 2012 01:00 admin View Comments

As the Windows Azure platform began branching out last year from support for purely Microsoft frameworks like .NET, going so far as to incorporate Java, one possibility that was overlooked at the time was to support JavaScript. The reason seemed obvious: JavaScript, as its creators would tell you, is a client language. Well, that’s no longer true, now that Node.js makes it about as easy to write JavaScript for the V8 interpreter on the server as it is for V8 in Google Chrome on the client.

Last month, Azure demonstrated how much both its platform and its proprietor’s attitude had matured by opening up support for Node.js. Today at a summit of Node.js developers in San Francisco, the maker of a SaaS-based IDE for developers, announced it has added the ability for developers to deploy Node.js apps to Azure.

Cloud9 began supporting Node.js on the Joyent cloud last July, and then added Node.js support for Heroku just last September.

The Cloud9 IDE provides all the basic functions that a developer would expect from an “Express” IDE, except it doesn’t have to be installed anyplace. Taking a cue from cloud-delivered word processors, it provides a full development and debugging console, including the ability to set breakpoints and run immediate JS instructions using a console window. Previous editions of Cloud9 bore a greater similarity to Visual Studio, but the latest edition deployed now utilizes a more distinct style, with functional icons along the left side, a column for logging events in the middle, and the editor window as the rightmost two-thirds.

The development team released a set of videos this morning (part 1 of which appears above) showing how deployment and execution of a task remains a one-click process for Azure, just as it has been for Heroku and Joyent.

Cloud9 is typically available to developers through a kind of voluntary subscription model. A developer can opt to use the product for free, so long as he makes his source code available to others through an open source license. Developers who wish to retain the right to use their own proprietary licenses pay $15 per month. A Cloud9 spokesperson confirmed to RWW this afternoon that both options remain available for developers deploying to Azure.

Source: Cloud9 IDE to Enable Node.js App Posting to Windows Azure Cloud

Cloud9 IDE to Enable Node.js App Posting to Windows Azure Cloud

January 24th, 2012 01:00 admin View Comments

As the Windows Azure platform began branching out last year from support for purely Microsoft frameworks like .NET, going so far as to incorporate Java, one possibility that was overlooked at the time was to support JavaScript. The reason seemed obvious: JavaScript, as its creators would tell you, is a client language. Well, that’s no longer true, now that Node.js makes it about as easy to write JavaScript for the V8 interpreter on the server as it is for V8 in Google Chrome on the client.

Last month, Azure demonstrated how much both its platform and its proprietor’s attitude had matured by opening up support for Node.js. Today at a summit of Node.js developers in San Francisco, the maker of a SaaS-based IDE for developers, announced it has added the ability for developers to deploy Node.js apps to Azure.

Cloud9 began supporting Node.js on the Joyent cloud last July, and then added Node.js support for Heroku just last September.

The Cloud9 IDE provides all the basic functions that a developer would expect from an “Express” IDE, except it doesn’t have to be installed anyplace. Taking a cue from cloud-delivered word processors, it provides a full development and debugging console, including the ability to set breakpoints and run immediate JS instructions using a console window. Previous editions of Cloud9 bore a greater similarity to Visual Studio, but the latest edition deployed now utilizes a more distinct style, with functional icons along the left side, a column for logging events in the middle, and the editor window as the rightmost two-thirds.

The development team released a set of videos this morning (part 1 of which appears above) showing how deployment and execution of a task remains a one-click process for Azure, just as it has been for Heroku and Joyent.

Cloud9 is typically available to developers through a kind of voluntary subscription model. A developer can opt to use the product for free, so long as he makes his source code available to others through an open source license. Developers who wish to retain the right to use their own proprietary licenses pay $15 per month. A Cloud9 spokesperson confirmed to RWW this afternoon that both options remain available for developers deploying to Azure.

Source: Cloud9 IDE to Enable Node.js App Posting to Windows Azure Cloud