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Posts Tagged ‘Nike’

Nike+ FuelBand: Possibly a Big Security Hole For Your Life

November 10th, 2012 11:04 admin View Comments

Security

MojoKid writes “Nike+ FuelBand is a $149 wristband with LED display that tracks your daily activity, tells you how many calories you’ve burned, lets you know how much fuel you have left in the tank, and basically keeps track of ‘every move you make.’ If you think that sounds like a privacy nightmare waiting to happen, it pretty much is. A source directly connected to Nike reported an amusing, albeit startling anecdote about a guy who got caught cheating on his girlfriend because of the Nike+ FuelBand. ‘They shared their activity between each other and she noticed he was active at 1-2AM, when he was supposed to be home.’ That’s just one scenario. What if the wristband gets lost or stolen? How much data is actually stored on these sorts of devices? And remember, you’re syncing it to the cloud with an iOS or Android app.”

Source: Nike+ FuelBand: Possibly a Big Security Hole For Your Life

Top 6 Mobile Apps for the Fitness Junkie

April 17th, 2012 04:00 admin View Comments

Trees are spouting leaves, flowers are sprouting where you would not ordinarily expect flowers, and the mornings and evenings are warm enough to get outdoors. Time to put on those running shoes, grab that bike or just go for a stroll. It is springtime.

What do people do in spring? They look around their houses and apartments and say, “Where did all of this stuff come from?” They then clean the house. After that they look at themselves and say, “Where did all of these extra pounds come from?” They then decide it is time to exercise and lose the winter weight. Yet, instead of employing a personal trainer, consumers can find one right in their pockets.

Smartphones have the capabilities to monitor your heart rate, track how many calories you burned, see how far you have run and share all of that information with your friends to help you stay motivated. We take a look at some of the best mobile fitness apps below.

RunKeeper

– (iOS, Android)

RunKeeper is one of the top fitness apps on Android and iOS. It tracks your run or bike by how far you went, how long it took and the route you travelled. It has a personal dashboard to see all of your historical activities and monitor how you are progressing in your workout routines. Also, you have the ability to share with the RunKeeper.com community (which becomes your own personal cloud of fitness stats), along with Twitter and Facebook to get your friends and family in on the interaction. Nothing pushes you more than being held accountable by your loved ones. The app also integrates with an iPhone’s music section to play tunes while you work out.

RunKeeper is one of the biggest fitness apps on the market, but it is more than that. It is a platform that developers can pull data from and push data to through the API it released last year. That means that many other types of fitness applications can interact with the RunKeeper platform, such as body building, biking, sleeping, strength training and nutrition.

Nike+

– (iOS)

Nike+ GPS is a lot like RunKeeper but with all the power of one of the world’s largest shoe manufacturers behind it. The iPhone app offers GPS, pace tracking, a timer for short or long runs, a calorie counter, a pedometer and a music player. It is also social through Twitter, Path or Facebook. Nike+ also comes with the full celebrity endorsement of top athletes that have signed with Nike, allowing you to get feedback from the best of the best. Nike+ also offers the FuelBand, which is a bracelet that works as an accelerometer and tracks your movements whether you are running, walking or dancing.

Fleetly

– (iOS)

Fleetly is an exercise log and tracker that has built-in game mechanics to push you further and farther every time you work out. It integrates with RunKeeper, Nike+, Fleetly.com’s own platform and the Withings Wi-Fi Body Scale. You can get rid of your personal trainer and go straight to Fleetly, which has professionally written descriptions of top exercises and instructional videos. It also has a Workout Generator, where you can see what type of equipment is around you and figure out what to do with it. It’s great for people (like me) that look at a piece of exercise equipment as if it were the Mars Rover – vaguely familiar-looking but perplexing to operate. It also allows you to track your exercise and is integrated with the RunKeeper API. And, you can challenge your friends on the leader board.

Gym Hero

– (iOS)

This app is drop-dead simple but highly effective for weight-training nuts. How many reps did you do? At what weight? How often? What part of the body? If you work out enough, sometimes you forget what part of your weekly routine you’re in. Keep it in the Gym Hero log, which takes advantage of the RunKeeper API, as well as Facebook and Twitter.

iMapMyRun

– (iOS, Android, BlackBerry)

iMapMy comes from MapMyFitness. The publisher offers a variety of apps such as iMapMyRun/Ride/Walk/Fitness/Hike. iMapMyRun records your route like Nike+, and has social networking and website integration like RunKeeper. It is not quite in the same class as RunKeeper or Nike+, but it works well enough for what you are trying to do – which is map where you are going when you work out. It also has a slightly creepy feature: the ability to live-track your friends and family while they are out on the road in real-time. This is an opt-in feature, of course. Like RunKeeper, the website has the ability to log nutritional information and other exercise details, but it does not function like a platform off of which other developers can build. It’s available for BlackBerry as well, which is not something we see all that often anymore.

Calorie Counter & Diet Tracker

– (iOS, Android)

Considered one of the top calorie counter apps for iOS and Android, Calorie Counter & Diet Tracker is published by MyFitnessPal.com. It has a food database with over 1.1 million foods that is easily searchable and available offline. It incorporates a bar code scanner for when you are shopping, and it can remember your favorite foods and save entire meals. It can track your progress and compare it with your friends. Additionally, it has over 350 exercises for cardio and strength training.

Lead photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Source: Top 6 Mobile Apps for the Fitness Junkie

Nike to Unveil Self Lacing Shoes?

September 8th, 2011 09:50 admin View Comments

Image

xTK-421x writes “Looks like Nike is announcing tonight (8:30PM PST) that they’ve finally been able to create the self lacing shoes from Back to the Future 2. TechCrunch reported on receiving an invitation to a Nike event taking place in Los Angeles today, where Nike would announce the release of the Air Mags, the self-lacing shoes that first made their appearance in Back to the Future II.”

Source: Nike to Unveil Self Lacing Shoes?

Apple Removes Ability to Sync Nike+ Workout Data Via iTunes in iOS 5

August 19th, 2011 08:29 admin View Comments

iOS 5

iLounge reports that Apple has removed the ability to sync Nike+ workout data via iTunes in iOS 5 beta 6 that was seeded to developers few hours back.

iLounge reports that users are informed that they no longer need iTunes to sync their Nike+ workout data and can now send it directly using the “Send Workouts to Nike+†feature in the iOS device’s Nike + iPod settings on the iPhone.

Apple has removed the Nike + iPod synchronization tab for iOS 5 devices in iTunes 10.5.

iLounge reports:

With the release of iOS 5, Apple appears ready to end iTunes’ use as a middleman between iOS devices and nikeplus.com. According to an anonymous source, iOS 5 beta 6 devices with Nike+ data now prompt an iTunes dialog box stating that workout data can now be sent using the “Send Workouts to Nike+†feature in the iOS device’s Nike + iPod settings, and iTunes 10.5 no longer displays a Nike + iPod synchronization tab for iOS 5 devices.

iLounge points out that the ability to sync Nike+ workout data wirelessly to nikeplus.com was first introduced in iOS 4.1, but users still had the ability to sync the data the older way, which was via iTunes. Apple has removed this older option in iOS 5 beta 6.

So not a major change, but a step in the right direction by Apple to enforce iOS device users to use more convenient PC Free features with iOS 5.

[via iLounge]

Source: Apple Removes Ability to Sync Nike+ Workout Data Via iTunes in iOS 5

Review: Nike+ SportWatch GPS

April 14th, 2011 04:03 admin View Comments

While I am aware that my body generally looks like poorly mixed pizza dough spread over a misshapen skeleton, I do like to get my runs in when I can. For years I’ve tried all sorts of sports watches, from GPS devices from Garmin that looked like cigarette packages with straps to heart rate monitors that told my how hard I was working while wandering down the stairs to make a sandwich.

That’s why I was actually quite intrigued by the Nike+ SportWatch. Nike+ has long been the domain of iPod and iPhone users and the original Nike+ devices were designed to work specifically with Apple music players. Slowly, Nike weaned themselves off of the produce of Cupertino and began building standalone devices including an underpowered “sport watch” that worked with the Nike+ foot pod and now this, a more complete solution with built-in TomTom GPS sensor. It is also compatible with the Polar Wearlink+ Transmitter heart-rate transmitter, in case you also wanted to check your heart rate during the run.

The SportWatch connects to Nike+ footpods or it can grab data from orbiting GPS satellites. The footpod, actually a tiny disc-shaped device that fits inside certain Nike shoes or, with a bit of finagling, on the outside of any standard pair of running shoes, senses your footfalls and distance travelled and allows for exercise measurements indoors and in locations where GPS reception is limited. The GPS sensor, however, is quite superior to the footpod and offers an up-to-the-second read out of your speed and distance.

When you’re done with your run you simply flip down an ingenious little cover to expose a USB connector and then plug it into your Mac or PC. Your run is uploaded to the Nike+ website and stored. There you can set goals, see your performance, and even challenge other Nike+ users to races. The screen is quite readable and a built-in backlight ensures you can see how fast you’re going in the dark.

Like all sports watches, this model requires considerable discipline to gain any benefits from it at all and even those benefits – unless you’re training for a longer race – are dubious. However, I was pleased with the overall design and usability of the watch and I barely noticed it on my wrist during the few runs I took it on. Nike has done an excellent job of completely stripping out extraneous settings, even to the point of removing date and time settings and requiring a PC sync to change any settings. Many sports watches suffer from a surfeit of features all controlled with two or three inscrutable buttons. This watch basically lets you start a run and end a run and then go over previous runs. It will also remind you of upcoming planned runs. You can also tap the screen to set lap times. But, thankfully, that’s about it. Many newer watches create “ghost competitors” for you to race against and offer way too many read-outs and numbers on screen at a time. The closest thing this watch gives to feedback is a “Good run!” message when you’re done.

The watch is rechargeable and lasts about four days on one charge. You can charge it via USB in a few hours.

Again, rather than stuff this watch full of on-screen functionality, most of the magic happens in the included Nike+ app and website. For that Nike is to be commended. Most GPS watches of this sort are far too complex for their own good.

That said, does the world need another GPS watch? If I didn’t, for example, carry and iPod or iPhone with me during runs I’d say “Yes.” However, many of the features built into this watch can be replicated with a good app. But you are not always going to be carrying a few hundred dollars worth of mobile electronics with you during a 10K, so this is the next best thing.

At $199 the SportWatch is a little pricey but I would agree that you’re getting what you pay for. Again, I’m no longer a huge fan of the whole “all-in-one” sports watch system but this one performs quite admirably and is amazingly easy to use. And if it gets me out of the house for a run or two, I’m happy.

Product Page


John Biggs is a Brooklyn-based writer. You can Tweet him here and email him at john at crunchgear dot com.

Source: Review: Nike+ SportWatch GPS

#REDALLOVER: Nike Leans On Twitter To Design New USA Men’s Soccer Kit

March 25th, 2011 03:20 admin View Comments

Team USA play Argentina tomorrow at the New Meadowlands Stadium in New Jersey, and while we’re all excited to see Messi & Co. pretty much run circles around the team, at least our boys will look good in the process. Nike continues to supply the United States Men’s National Team with its official kit, and once again there are a few improvements worth highlighting. So let’s do just that now.

First off, it’s red! Yes, Nike has finally produced a red kit, to go along its usual white (home) and blue (away) designs. That’s not really tech-y, no, but it’s probably the first thing you’ll notice. Nike says it created the red kit in response to fan demand: USA, home of the red, white, and blue, so where’s the red? Along those lines.

As for the exciting technology, you can partially thank Twitter for the design. Nike had enlisted the micro-blogging service to ask fans to submit a slogan that will be embroidered on the sleeve in time for the game. The campaign, called #REDALLOVER, ended Wednesday night, so if you didn’t already submit your hashtagged slogan, oh well. Maybe next time.

Of course, like all Nike kits, it’s made from environmentally friendly materials that the players can actually breathe in as they try to chase down Messi’s mazy runs.

Good luck with that, guys.


Source: #REDALLOVER: Nike Leans On Twitter To Design New USA Men’s Soccer Kit

Going The Distance: Nike+ GPS Vs. RunKeeper

October 9th, 2010 10:31 admin View Comments

As someone who ostensibly tries to keep fit, I’ve found the best way to pretend to lose weight is to fiddle around with iPhone apps during my workout. First, it reduces the mind-crushing pain of exercise and allows me to go to a place in myself where I can avoid the boredom of exertion.

To that end I decided to test out the new Nike+ GPS app alongside an old favorite, RunKeeper.

Both apps have their pluses and minuses. Clearly RunKeeper is aimed squarely at the professional or at least obsessive runner, while the Nike+ software is aimed at a more casual user. Both have their value in the training arsenals of the average runner, and many of the hardware-specific features of Nike+ have been stripped out of the new GPS version, thereby putting both apps on equal footing.

Read the rest of this entry »

Source: Going The Distance: Nike+ GPS Vs. RunKeeper

Nike Releases New GPS-Based iPhone App For Runners

September 7th, 2010 09:41 admin View Comments

Nike+ GPS iPhone app

The Apple App Store has a good collection of fitness apps and many of them do a great job at helping users execute their fitness routines.

Nike has now announced a new application that offers a nice alternative to the several free and paid fitness apps now available on the App Store. 

The new Nike+ GPS application is targeted at the runners who can use the application to track their route, running speed, calories burned and also compare it with their previous routines. The application is presently available only in English and can be purchased from the App Store for a price of $1.99. 

Here are some of the features available in this new iPhone app

Visual Mapping: Users may track their run both indoors and outdoors using the "free range" and "treadmill" options. These are visually tracked and the maps will tell the user the path taken along with interesting details such as the distance covered, calories burned as well as the speed at different points during the run. 

Challenge Me: The app comes with a Challenge Me feature that will give users a chance to beat their personal best in terms of distance covered, duration of the workout or their running speed.

Motivational Messages: Users can also listen to on-demand motivational messages from pro atheletes and celebrities during their run.

Social Sharing: The Nike+ GPS iPhone app is integrated with the NikePlus website where users may save each of their run to their profile. Additionally, they can also share this with friends and followers on Facebook and Twitter apart from inviting their friends to join the challenge.

Nike+ GPS iPhone app

The Nike+ GPS iPhone app is supported on iOS 4 or later and is compatible with iPhone 3GS and iPhone 4 as well as the second and later generations of the iPod Touch. You can download the app from the App Store by clicking here. As always, do not forget to tell us how you find this iPhone application.

Source: Nike Releases New GPS-Based iPhone App For Runners

American Business Embraces ‘Gamification’

September 6th, 2010 09:41 admin View Comments

Hugh Pickens writes “JP Mangalindan writes that for years psychologists have studied what makes video games so engrossing — why do players spend hours accruing virtual points working towards intangible rewards and what characteristics make some games more addictive than others? Now, companies are realizing that ‘gamification’ — using the same mechanics that hook gamers — is an effective way to generate business. For example, when Nike released Nike + in 2008, it ‘gamified’ exercise. ‘Place the pedometer in a pair of (Nike) sneaks and it monitors distance, pace and calories burned, transmitting that data to the user’s iPod. The Nike software loaded on the iPod will then “reward” users if they reach a milestone,’ writes Mangalindan. ‘If a runner beats his 5-mile distance record, an audio clip from Tour de France cycling champ Lance Armstrong congratulates him.’ In addition, users can upload their information, discuss achievements online with other users, and challenge them to distance or speed competitions. The result: to date, Nike has moved well over 1.3 million Nike + units.”

Source: American Business Embraces ‘Gamification’

American Business Embraces ‘Gamification’

September 6th, 2010 09:41 admin View Comments

Hugh Pickens writes “JP Mangalindan writes that for years psychologists have studied what makes video games so engrossing — why do players spend hours accruing virtual points working towards intangible rewards and what characteristics make some games more addictive than others? Now, companies are realizing that ‘gamification’ — using the same mechanics that hook gamers — is an effective way to generate business. For example, when Nike released Nike + in 2008, it ‘gamified’ exercise. ‘Place the pedometer in a pair of (Nike) sneaks and it monitors distance, pace and calories burned, transmitting that data to the user’s iPod. The Nike software loaded on the iPod will then “reward” users if they reach a milestone,’ writes Mangalindan. ‘If a runner beats his 5-mile distance record, an audio clip from Tour de France cycling champ Lance Armstrong congratulates him.’ In addition, users can upload their information, discuss achievements online with other users, and challenge them to distance or speed competitions. The result: to date, Nike has moved well over 1.3 million Nike + units.”

Source: American Business Embraces ‘Gamification’

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