Archive

Posts Tagged ‘New Mexico’

Legislators: ‘Spaceport America Could Become a Ghost Town’

January 4th, 2013 01:05 admin View Comments

Space

RocketAcademy writes “A group of New Mexico legislators is warning that the $200-million Spaceport America ‘could become a ghost town, with tumbleweeds crossing the runways‘ if trial lawyers succeed in blocking critical liability legislation. The warning came in a letter to the Albuquerque Journal [subscription or free trial may be required]. Virgin Galactic has signed a lease to become the spaceport’s anchor tenant, but may pull out if New Mexico is unable to provide liability protection for manufacturers and part suppliers, similar to legislation already passed by Texas, Colorado, Florida, and Virginia. The proposed legislation is also similar to liability protection which New Mexico offers to the ski industry. An eclectic group of business and civic interests has formed the Save Our Spaceport Coalition to support passage of the liability reform legislation, which is being fought by the New Mexico Trial Lawyers Association.”

Source: Legislators: ‘Spaceport America Could Become a Ghost Town’

Supercomputer Repossessed By State, May Be Sold In Pieces

January 3rd, 2013 01:05 admin View Comments

Supercomputing

1sockchuck writes “A supercomputer that was the third-fastest machine in the world in 2008 has been repossessed by the state of New Mexico and will likely be sold in pieces to three universities in the state. The state has been unable to find a buyer for the Encanto supercomputer, which was built and maintained with $20 million in state funding. The supercomputer had the enthusiastic backing of Gov. Bill Richardson, who saw the project as an economic development tool for New Mexico. But the commercial projects did not materialize, and Richardson’s successor, Susana Martinez, says the supercomputer is a ‘symbol of excess.’”

Source: Supercomputer Repossessed By State, May Be Sold In Pieces

Laser Prototype Improves Bomb Detection

December 10th, 2012 12:56 admin View Comments

Australia

angry tapir writes “Scientists at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Australia have developed a prototype laser device capable of detecting tiny traces of explosive vapor, an invention that has the potential to put bomb sniffer dogs out of a job. The prototype – a pulsed, quantum laser-based, cavity ring-down spectrometer – is being tested at the US government’s Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico.”

Source: Laser Prototype Improves Bomb Detection

Historians Propose National Park To Preserve Manhattan Project Sites

December 5th, 2012 12:36 admin View Comments

The Military

Hugh Pickens writes writes “William J. Broad writes that a plan now before Congress would create a national park to protect the aging remnants of the atomic bomb project from World War II, including hundreds of buildings and artifacts scattered across New Mexico, Washington and Tennessee — among them the rustic Los Alamos home of Dr. Oppenheimer and his wife, Kitty, and a large Quonset hut, also in New Mexico, where scientists assembled components for the plutonium bomb dropped on Japan. ‘It’s a way to help educate the next generation,’ says Cynthia C. Kelly, president of the Atomic Heritage Foundation, a private group in Washington that helped develop the preservation plan. ‘This is a major chapter of American and world history. We should preserve what’s left.’ Critics have faulted the plan as celebrating a weapon of mass destruction, and have argued that the government should avoid that kind of advocacy. ‘At a time when we should be organizing the world toward abolishing nuclear weapons before they abolish us, we are instead indulging in admiration at our cleverness as a species,’ says Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich. Historians and federal agencies reply that preservation does not imply moral endorsement, and that the remains of so monumental a project should be saved as a way to encourage comprehension and public discussion. A park would be a commemoration, not a celebration, says Heather McClenahan, director of the Los Alamos Historical Society pointing out there are national parks commemorating slavery, Civil War battles and American Indian massacres. ‘It’s a chance to say, “Why did we do this? What were the good things that happened? What were the bad? How do we learn lessons from the past? How do we not ever have to use an atomic bomb in warfare again?” ‘”

Source: Historians Propose National Park To Preserve Manhattan Project Sites

Historians Propose National Park To Preserve Manhattan Project Sites

December 5th, 2012 12:36 admin View Comments

The Military

Hugh Pickens writes writes “William J. Broad writes that a plan now before Congress would create a national park to protect the aging remnants of the atomic bomb project from World War II, including hundreds of buildings and artifacts scattered across New Mexico, Washington and Tennessee — among them the rustic Los Alamos home of Dr. Oppenheimer and his wife, Kitty, and a large Quonset hut, also in New Mexico, where scientists assembled components for the plutonium bomb dropped on Japan. ‘It’s a way to help educate the next generation,’ says Cynthia C. Kelly, president of the Atomic Heritage Foundation, a private group in Washington that helped develop the preservation plan. ‘This is a major chapter of American and world history. We should preserve what’s left.’ Critics have faulted the plan as celebrating a weapon of mass destruction, and have argued that the government should avoid that kind of advocacy. ‘At a time when we should be organizing the world toward abolishing nuclear weapons before they abolish us, we are instead indulging in admiration at our cleverness as a species,’ says Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich. Historians and federal agencies reply that preservation does not imply moral endorsement, and that the remains of so monumental a project should be saved as a way to encourage comprehension and public discussion. A park would be a commemoration, not a celebration, says Heather McClenahan, director of the Los Alamos Historical Society pointing out there are national parks commemorating slavery, Civil War battles and American Indian massacres. ‘It’s a chance to say, “Why did we do this? What were the good things that happened? What were the bad? How do we learn lessons from the past? How do we not ever have to use an atomic bomb in warfare again?” ‘”

Source: Historians Propose National Park To Preserve Manhattan Project Sites

Supersonic Skydive Attempt Delayed 24 Hours

October 8th, 2012 10:44 admin View Comments

Space

First time accepted submitter poofmeisterp writes Felix Baumgarner’s planned record jump from 120,000 feet has been delayed due to bad wind.’ Humor aside, it’s good that careful thought is going into this potentially record-setting public act. From the article: ‘The Austrian – who described himself as “like a tiger in a cage waiting to get out” – was due to leap from his Red Bull Stratos space capsule today at a planned altitude of 36,576m (120,000ft) over the New Mexico desert. However, the weather has forced a 24-hour launch delay. In July, Baumgartner jumped from an altitude of 29,455m (96,640ft), hitting 586.92km/h (364.69mph) during the free fall part of his drop.’”

Source: Supersonic Skydive Attempt Delayed 24 Hours

Felix Baumgartner Prepares for Supersonic Skydive Attempt in New Mexico

October 7th, 2012 10:28 admin View Comments

Transportation

Austrian daredevil Felix Baumgartner has tempted fate with quite a few spectacular skydiving feats; now, he is preparing to be the first man to intentionally exceed the speed of sound by jumping from a balloon instead of staying inside a plane or a rocket. The jump is planned for Tuesday over New Mexico. National Geographic lists some of the various (deadly) things that could go wrong.

Source: Felix Baumgartner Prepares for Supersonic Skydive Attempt in New Mexico

Wi-Fi Illness Claim Doesn’t Impress New Mexico Court

September 20th, 2012 09:24 admin View Comments

The Courts

McGruber writes “Arthur Firstenberg, the Santa Fe, New Mexico man who sued his neighbors, claiming their Wi-Fi made him sick, has lost what might have been his final round in court. According to the Santa Fe New Mexican, state District Judge Sarah Singleton ruled that no scientific study has yet proved that electromagnetic stimulus adversely impacts personal health. While he lost the lawsuit, he did score a victory: the neighbors he sued have moved out of Santa Fe.”

Source: Wi-Fi Illness Claim Doesn’t Impress New Mexico Court

Read/Write Daily: An Army of Robot Fish

May 29th, 2012 05:30 admin View Comments

Today’s theme is R&D. Even in seemingly calamitous times, there’s still mind-boggling technological progress rolling out. It hasn’t saved the world yet, but some pieces are falling into place.

Look at these new inventions and imagine the possibilities.

Fox News (sorry) reports on a new scientific ghost town, the Center for Innovation, being built in New Mexico to test the next generation of everyday technologies.

Here’s the press release from Pegasus Global Holdings, which is financing the project, to get a sense of the ambitions.

Many of our next decade’s inventions will be made out of superstrong, light materials like graphene. To make things out of graphene with precision, it looks like we’ll have to use microscopic robots!

We’ll also need renewable power supplies for our inventions, and new kinds of solar cells are showing some promising efficiency ratings.

Our future technologies will have to be much cleaner than our present ones. Researchers are building artificially intelligent robotic fish (!!!) to help with the clean-up.

Speaking of artificial intelligence, here’s a great essay about why human intelligence is overrated.

Image via Shutterstock

Past entries from Read/Write Daily

Source: Read/Write Daily: An Army of Robot Fish

Location Selected For $1 Billion Ghost Town

May 13th, 2012 05:16 admin View Comments

Science

Hugh Pickens writes “Although a fully operation city with no people sounds like the setup for a dystopian sci-fi novel, the Boston Globe reports that the Center for Innovation, Testing and Evaluation will develop a $1 billion scientific ghost town near Hobbs, New Mexico to help researchers test everything from intelligent traffic systems and next-generation wireless networks to automated washing machines and self-flushing toilets on existing infrastructure without interfering in everyday life. Bob Brumley, senior managing director of Pegasus Holdings, says the town will be modeled after the real city of Rock Hill, South Carolina, complete with highways, houses and commercial buildings, old and new. Unlike traditional cities, City Labs will start with its underground ‘backbone’ infrastructure that will allow the lab to monitor activity throughout the 17-mile site. Since nobody lives in the Center’s buildings, computerized systems will mimic human behavior such as turning thermostats up and down, switching lights off and on, or flushing toilets. The Center’s test facilities and supporting infrastructure may require as much as 20 square miles of open, unimproved land where the controlled environment will permit evaluation of the positive and negative impacts of smart grid applications and integration of renewable energies for residential, commercial and industrial sectors of the economy. ‘It’s an amusement park for the scientists,’ adds Brumley.”

Source: Location Selected For $1 Billion Ghost Town

YOYOYOOYOYOYO