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Posts Tagged ‘New Jersey’

Israel To Get Massive Countrywide Optical Upgrade

December 27th, 2012 12:50 admin View Comments

Networking

A Google Fiberhood-style rollout in the U.S., says a Goldman-Sachs estimate, would cost in the neighborhood of $140 billion. Even for Israel, a country approximately the size of New Jersey, there’s a high pricetag (“billions of shekels”) for installing fiber optics dense enough to reach most of the population, but just a massive fiber-optic rollout is planned, with the project led by Swedish firm Viaeuropa. If the scheme succeeds, it will cover two thirds of the country over the next 10 years or so.

Source: Israel To Get Massive Countrywide Optical Upgrade

Insurance Industry Looking Hard At Climate Change

December 25th, 2012 12:24 admin View Comments

Businesses

A recent paper in Science (abstract) examines the insurance industry’s reaction to climate change. The industry rakes in trillions of dollars in revenues every year, and a shifting climate would have the potential to drastically cut into the profits left over after settlements have been paid. Hurricane Sandy alone did about $80 billion worth of damage to New York and New Jersey. With incredible amounts of money at stake, the industry is taking climate projections quite seriously. From the article: “Many insurers are using climate science to better quantify and diversify their exposure, more accurately price and communicate risk, and target adaptation and loss-prevention efforts. They also analyze their extensive databases of historical weather- and climate-related losses, for both large- and small-scale events. But insurance modeling is a distinct discipline. Unlike climate models, insurers’ models extrapolate historical data rather than simulate the climate system, and they require outputs at finer scales and shorter time frames than climate models.”

Source: Insurance Industry Looking Hard At Climate Change

Drawings of Weapons Led To New Jersey Student’s Arrest

December 22nd, 2012 12:21 admin View Comments

Censorship

First time accepted submitter gannebraemorr writes with this news, snipped from a CBS News report out of New Jersey:“‘The Superintendent of the Greater Egg Harbor Regional High School District said around 2 pm Tuesday, a 16 year old student demonstrated behavior that caused concern. A teacher noticed drawings of what appeared to be weapons in his notebook. School officials made the decision to contact authorities. Police removed the 16-year-old boy from Cedar Creek High School in Galloway Township Tuesday afternoon after school officials became concerned about his behavior. The student was taken to the Galloway Township Police Department. Police then searched the boy’s home on the 300 block of East Spencer Lane and found several electronic parts and several types of chemicals that when mixed together, could cause an explosion, police say. The unidentified teen was charged with possession of a weapon an [sic] explosive device and the juvenile was placed in Harbor Fields.’ If ‘chemicals that when mixed together, could cause an explosion’ is a crime, I’m pretty sure everyone’s cleaning cabinets are evidence just waiting to be found. Bottle of Coke and Mentos… BRB, someone knocking at the door.”

Source: Drawings of Weapons Led To New Jersey Student’s Arrest

Solar Panels For Every Home?

December 14th, 2012 12:10 admin View Comments

Power

Hugh Pickens writes “David Crane and Robert F.Kennedy Jr. write in the NY Times that with residents of New Jersey and New York living through three major storms in the past 16 months and suffering sustained blackouts, we need to ask whether it is really sensible to power the 21st century by using an antiquated and vulnerable system of copper wires and wooden poles. Some have taken matters into their own hands, purchasing portable gas-powered generators to give themselves varying degrees of grid independence. But these dirty, noisy and expensive devices have no value outside of a power failure and there is a better way to secure grid independence for our homes and businesses: electricity-producing photovoltaic panels installed on houses, warehouses and over parking lots, wired so that they deliver power when the grid fails. ‘Solar panels have dropped in price by 80 percent in the past five years and can provide electricity at a cost that is at or below the current retail cost of grid power in 20 states, including many of the Northeast states,’ write Crane and Kennedy. ‘So why isn’t there more of a push for this clean, affordable, safe and inexhaustible source of electricity?’ First, the investor-owned utilities that depend on the existing system for their profits have little economic interest in promoting a technology that empowers customers to generate their own power. Second, state regulatory agencies and local governments impose burdensome permitting and siting requirements that unnecessarily raise installation costs. While it can take as little as eight days to license and install a solar system on a house in Germany, in the United States, depending on your state, the average ranges from 120 to 180 days.”

Source: Solar Panels For Every Home?

Real-World Cyber City Used To Train Cyber Warriors

November 28th, 2012 11:44 admin View Comments

Security

Orome1 writes NetWars CyberCity is a small-scale city located close by the New Jersey Turnpike complete with a bank, hospital, water tower, train system, electric power grid, and a coffee shop. It was developed to teach cyber warriors from the U.S. military how online actions can have kinetic effects. Developed in response to a challenge by U.S. military cyber warriors, NetWars CyberCity is an intense defensive training program organized around missions. ‘We’ve built over eighteen missions, and each of them challenges participants to devise strategies and employ tactics to thwart computer attacks that would cause significant real-world damage,’ commented Ed Skoudis, SANS Instructor and NetWars CyberCity Director.”

Source: Real-World Cyber City Used To Train Cyber Warriors

Red Light Cameras Raise Crash Risk, Cost

November 27th, 2012 11:33 admin View Comments

Government

concealment writes with news of dissatisfaction with a pilot program for stoplight-monitoring cameras. The program ran for several years in New Jersey, and according to a new report, the number of car crashes actually increased while the cameras were present. “[The program] appears to be changing drivers’ behavior, state officials said Monday, noting an overall decline in traffic citations and right-angle crashes. The Department of Transportation also said, however, that rear-end crashes have risen by 20 percent and total crashes are up by 0.9 percent at intersections where cameras have operated for at least a year. The agency recommended the program stay in place, calling for ‘continued data collection and monitoring’ of camera-monitored intersections. The department’s report drew immediate criticism from Assemblyman Declan O’Scanlon, R-Monmouth, who wants the cameras removed. He called the program ‘a dismal failure,’ saying DOT statistics show the net costs of accidents had climbed by more than $1 million at intersections with cameras.” Other cities are considering dumping the monitoring tech as well, citing similar cost and efficacy issues.

Source: Red Light Cameras Raise Crash Risk, Cost

How Data Center Operator IPR Survived Sandy

November 19th, 2012 11:23 admin View Comments

Data Storage

Nerval’s Lobster writes “At the end of October, Hurricane Sandy struck the eastern seaboard of the United States, leaving massive amounts of property damage in its wake. Data center operators in Sandy’s path were forced to take extreme measures to keep their systems up and running. While flooding and winds knocked some of them out of commission, others managed to keep their infrastructure online until the crisis passed. In our previous interview, we spoke with CoreSite, a Manhattan-based data center that endured even as much of New York City went without power. For this installment, Slashdot Datacenter sat down with executives from IPR, which operates two data centers—in Wilmington, Delaware and Reading, Pennsylvania—close to Sandy’s track as it made landfall over New Jersey and pushed northwest.”

Source: How Data Center Operator IPR Survived Sandy

New Jersey Coast: Before and After Sandy

November 8th, 2012 11:09 admin View Comments

Voting Machine Problem Reports Already Rolling In

November 6th, 2012 11:35 admin View Comments

Image

Several readers have submitted news of the inevitable problems involved with trying to securely collect information from tens of millions of people on the same day. A video is making the rounds of a touchscreen voting machine registering a vote for Mitt Romney when Barack Obama was selected. A North Carolina newspaper is reporting that votes for Romney are being switched to Obama. Voters are being encouraged to check and double-check that their votes are recorded accurately. In Ohio, some recently-installed election software got a pass from a District Court Judge. In Galveston County, Texas, poll workers didn’t start their computer systems early enough to be ready for the opening of the polls, which led to a court order requiring the stations to be open for an extra two hours at night. Yesterday we discussed how people in New Jersey who were displaced by the storm would be allowed to vote via email; not only are some of the emails bouncing, but voters are being directed to request ballots from a county clerk’s personal Hotmail account. If only vote machines were as secure as slot machines. Of course, there’s still the good, old fashioned analog problems; workers tampering with ballots, voters being told they can vote tomorrow, and people leaving after excessively long wait times.

Source: Voting Machine Problem Reports Already Rolling In

New Jersey Residents Displaced By Storm Can Vote By Email

November 4th, 2012 11:20 admin View Comments

Security

First time accepted submitter danbuter writes “In probably the most poorly thought-out reaction to allowing people displaced by Hurricane Sandy in New Jersey [to take part in the 2012 presidential election], residents will be allowed to vote by email. Of course, this will be completely secure and work perfectly!” Writes user Beryllium Sphere: “There’s no mention of any protocol that might possible make this acceptable. Perhaps the worst thing that could happen would be if it appears to work OK and gains acceptance.” I know someone they should consult first.

Source: New Jersey Residents Displaced By Storm Can Vote By Email

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