Archive

Posts Tagged ‘national science foundation’

Forbes 2013 Career List Flamed By University Professors

January 5th, 2013 01:45 admin View Comments

Education

An anonymous reader writes “The Forbes list of ‘least stressful jobs’ for 2013 is headlined by… university professors. This comes at a time in which the academic community has been featured on controversies about 100-hour week work journeys, doctors live on food stamps, tenured staff is laid off large science institutions, and the National Science Foundation suffers severe budget cuts, besides the well known (and sometimes publicized) politics of publish or perish. The Forbes reporter has received abundant feedback and published a shy, foot-note ‘addendum’; however, the cited source, CareerCast (which does not map to any recognizable career journalist, but rather to a Sports writer), does not seem to have had the same luck. The comments of the Forbes reporter on the existence of a Summer break for graduates (‘I am curious whether professors work that hard over the summer’) are particularly noteworthy.” Here is the CareerCast report the article is based on, and a list of the “stress factors” they considered. The author of the Forbes article passed on a very detailed explanation of how tough a university professor’s job can be.

Source: Forbes 2013 Career List Flamed By University Professors

Cyber Corps Program Trains Spies For the Digital Age, In Oklahoma

November 24th, 2012 11:22 admin View Comments

Education

David Hume writes “The Los Angeles Times has a story about the two-year University of Tulsa Cyber Corps Program. About ’85% of the 260 graduates since 2003 have gone to the NSA, which students call “the fraternity,” or the CIA, which they call “the sorority.”‘ ‘Other graduates have taken positions with the FBI, NASA and the Department of Homeland Security.’ According to the University of Tulsa website, two programs — the National Science Foundation’s Federal Cyber Service: Scholarship for Service and the Department of Defense’s (DOD’s) Information Assurance Scholarship Program — provide scholarships to Cyber Corps students.”

Source: Cyber Corps Program Trains Spies For the Digital Age, In Oklahoma

Astronomy Portfolio Review Recommends Defunding US’s Biggest Telescope

September 28th, 2012 09:35 admin View Comments

Space

derekmead writes “Data from the enormous Green Bank Telescope at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory has been used to test some of Einstein’s theories, discover new molecules in space, and find evidence of the building blocks of life and of the origins of galaxies. With 6,600 hours of observation time a year, the GBT produces massive amounts of data on the makeup of space, and any researchers with reason to use the data are welcome to do so. The eleven-year-old GBT stands as one of the crowning achievements of American big science. But with the National Science Foundation strapped for cash like most other science-minded government agencies, the NRAO’s funding is threatened. In August of this year, the Astronomy Portfolio Review, a committee appointed by the NSF, recommended that the GBT be defunded over the next five years. Researchers, along with locals and West Virginia congressmen, are fighting the decision, which puts the nearly $100 million telescope at risk. Unless they succeed, America’s giant dish will go silent.”

Source: Astronomy Portfolio Review Recommends Defunding US’s Biggest Telescope

US Astronomy Facing Severe Budget Cuts and Facility Closures

August 17th, 2012 08:31 admin View Comments

Space

Nancy_A writes The U.S. astronomy budget is facing unprecedented cuts, including the potential closure of several facilities. A new report by the National Science Foundation’s Division of Astronomical Sciences says available funding for ground-based astronomy could undershoot projected budgets by as much as 50%. The report recommends the closure – called ‘divestment’ in the new document — of iconic facilities such as the Very Long Baseline Array and the Green Bank Radio Telescope, as well as shutting down four different telescopes at the Kitt Peak Observatory by 2017.”

Source: US Astronomy Facing Severe Budget Cuts and Facility Closures

Programming — Now Starting In Elementary School

May 20th, 2012 05:52 admin View Comments

Education

the agent man writes “The idea of getting kids interested in programming in spite of their common perception of programming to be ‘hard and boring’ is an ongoing Slashdot discussion. With support of the National Science Foundation, the Scalable Game Design project has explored how to bring computer science education into the curriculum of middle and high schools for some time. The results are overwhelmingly positive, suggesting that game design is highly motivational across gender and ethnicity lines. The project is also finding new ways of tracking programming skills transferring from game design to STEM simulation building. This NPR story highlights an early and unplanned foray into bringing game-design based computer science education even to elementary schools.”

Source: Programming — Now Starting In Elementary School

Mobile Ads May Serve As a Malware Conduit

March 20th, 2012 03:25 admin View Comments

Android

alphadogg writes with this excerpt from Network World: “Many mobile apps include ads that can threaten users’ privacy and network security, according to North Carolina State University researchers. The National Science Foundation-funded researchers studied 100,000 apps in Google Play (formerly Android Market) and found that more than half contained ad libraries, nearly 300 of which were enabled to grab code from remote servers that could give malware and hackers a way into your smartphone or tablet. ‘Running code downloaded from the Internet is problematic because the code could be anything,’ says Xuxian Jiang, an assistant professor of computer science at NC State.”

Source: Mobile Ads May Serve As a Malware Conduit

Obama Budget Asks For 1% Boost In Research

February 13th, 2012 02:17 admin View Comments

The Almighty Buck

sciencehabit sends this excerpt from ScienceInsider: “One of the big three research agencies appears to be lagging behind its doubling peers in the president’s 2013 budget request released this morning. The $4.9 billion budget of the Department of Energy’s Office of Science would rise by 2.4%, to $5 billion. In contrast, the National Science Foundation would receive a nearly 5% boost, to $7.37 billion, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology a hike of 13%, to $860 million. These three agencies were originally singled by President George W. Bush in 2006 for a 10-year budget doubling, a promise that President Barack Obama and Congress have repeatedly endorsed despite the current tough economic times. … Obama is asking for a 1% increase in overall federal spending on research, to $140 billion. Within that total, the White House seeks a similar 1% hike in the $30 billion devoted to basic research.”

Source: Obama Budget Asks For 1% Boost In Research

Could Ancient Pottery Improve Spacecraft Tiles?

January 2nd, 2012 01:49 admin View Comments

Space

astroengine writes “Earlier this year, the National Science Foundation (NSF) awarded nearly $500,000 to scientists from the Getty Conservation Institute, Stanford’s National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) and the Aerospace Corporation to study the chemical and physical properties of ancient Attic pottery. Why? Well, the project will improve our understanding of iron-spinel chemistry, which is critical to the advanced ceramics used for thermal protection in aerospace applications, such as in the heat shield tiles used by spacecraft during atmospheric reentry.”

Source: Could Ancient Pottery Improve Spacecraft Tiles?

Cray Replaces IBM To Build $188M Supercomputer

November 14th, 2011 11:37 admin View Comments

Hardware

wiredmikey writes “Supercomputer maker Cray today said that the University of Illinois’ National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) awarded the company a contract to build a supercomputer for the National Science Foundation’s Blue Waters project. The supercomputer will be powered by new 16-core AMD Opteron 6200 Series processors (formerly code-named ‘Interlagos’) a next-generation GPU from NVIDIA, called ‘Kepler,’ and a new integrated storage solution from Cray. IBM was originally selected to build the supercomputer in 2007, but terminated the contract in August 2011, saying the project was more complex and required significantly increased financial and technical support beyond its original expectations. Once fully deployed, the system is expected to have a sustained performance of more than one petaflops on demanding scientific applications.

Source: Cray Replaces IBM To Build $188M Supercomputer

Cray Replaces IBM To Build $188M Supercomputer

November 14th, 2011 11:37 admin View Comments

Hardware

wiredmikey writes “Supercomputer maker Cray today said that the University of Illinois’ National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) awarded the company a contract to build a supercomputer for the National Science Foundation’s Blue Waters project. The supercomputer will be powered by new 16-core AMD Opteron 6200 Series processors (formerly code-named ‘Interlagos’) a next-generation GPU from NVIDIA, called ‘Kepler,’ and a new integrated storage solution from Cray. IBM was originally selected to build the supercomputer in 2007, but terminated the contract in August 2011, saying the project was more complex and required significantly increased financial and technical support beyond its original expectations. Once fully deployed, the system is expected to have a sustained performance of more than one petaflops on demanding scientific applications.

Source: Cray Replaces IBM To Build $188M Supercomputer

YOYOYOOYOYOYO