Archive

Posts Tagged ‘mission’

Christmas On Mars

December 25th, 2012 12:23 admin View Comments

Mars

At John Scalzi’s blog, astronomer and science fiction author Diane Turnshek writes about spending the holidays at the Mars Desert Research Station, a place in Utah where The Mars Society is running test missions to figure out proper procedures for living in a habitat on Mars. She says, “In sim, we eat rehydrated/dehydrated food, have a 20-minute lag time for communication, spend time in airlocks before going out on the surface and conserve water (Navy showers every three days). A row of parked ATVs out in front awaits us for our more distant EVAs. We have to be careful–the nearest hospital is forty miles away on back roads and there’s no cell service here on Mars. Reports are sent via email to Mission Support every evening in which we have to clearly explain any technical or medical problems and they respond in kind. I’ve been working in the Musk Observatory, taking CCD photometry of eclipsing binary stars.” You can also read the mission’s daily crew reports and browse through their photostream.

Source: Christmas On Mars

Twin Probes Crash Into the Moon

December 18th, 2012 12:27 admin View Comments

Moon

SchrodingerZ writes “After their yearlong mission to map the Moon’s gravitational field, twin probes Ebb and Flow crashed into the lunar surface, ending the GRAIL mission. The crashes were controlled events, each impacting 30 seconds apart from each other. The twin spacecraft were running low on maneuvering fuel and NASA, not wanting the crafts to fall on historical sites such as the Apollo landing sites, redirected their flight patterns to impart the far (dark) side of the moon. Their impact sites were named after Sally Ride, the first American woman in space. ‘During the news conference last week, Maria T. Zuber, the principal investigator, said the probes would be crashing into a “non-sunlit” part of the surface.’ When the site becomes sunlit again in several weeks, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter will attempt to take pictures of the craters the probes undoubtedly made in the lunar soil.”

Source: Twin Probes Crash Into the Moon

Apollo Veteran: Skip Asteroid, Go To the Moon

December 7th, 2012 12:48 admin View Comments

Moon

astroengine writes “It’s 40 years to the day that the final mission to the moon launched. Discovery News speaks with Apollo 17 astronaut and geologist Harrison ‘Jack’ Schmitt about where he thinks the Earth’s only satellite came from and why he thinks a NASA manned asteroid mission is a mistake. ‘I think an asteroid is a diversion,’ said Schmitt. ‘If the ultimate goal is to get to Mars, you have a satellite only three days away that has a great deal of science as well as resources. The science of the moon has just been scratched. We’ve hardly explored the moon.’” The National Research Council came out with a report a few days ago which found that the inability for the U.S. to find a consensus on where to go is damaging its ability to get there. Bill Nye spoke about the issue, saying, “I believe, as a country, we want to move NASA from [being] an engineering organization to a science organization, and this is going to take years, decades. Now, through investment, we have companies emerging that are exploring space on their own and will ultimately lower the cost of access to low-Earth orbit, which will free up NASA to go to these new and exciting places.”

Source: Apollo Veteran: Skip Asteroid, Go To the Moon

MIT-Led Mission Reveals the Moon’s Battered Crust Is Riddled With Cracks

December 5th, 2012 12:37 admin View Comments

Moon

SternisheFan sends this quote from the Boston Globe: “The moon’s battered crust is riddled with deep fractures that may extend miles underground, according to the first findings from two NASA spacecraft orbiting Earth’s nearest neighbor. The results of the mission, led by a Massachusetts Institute of Technology scientist, surprised researchers, who said it will provide new insight into the evolution of the early solar system, and even help inform the search for life on Mars. Announced Wednesday, the discoveries are also a reminder that the familiar moon still holds secrets four decades after NASA ended its manned missions there. ‘We have known that the moon’s crust and other planetary crusts have been bombarded by impacts, but none of us could have predicted just how cracked the lunar crust is,’ said Maria Zuber, the MIT geoscientist who led the mission, called GRAIL.” Here are the abstracts from the three studies published in Science.

Source: MIT-Led Mission Reveals the Moon’s Battered Crust Is Riddled With Cracks

Over 1000 Volunteers For ‘Suicide’ Mission To Mars

December 5th, 2012 12:34 admin View Comments

Mars

New submitter thAMESresearcher writes with a few updates on Mars One: “The Dutch company Mars One is organizing a one way mission to Mars 2023. In a press release that came out today, they say they have over a thousand applicants already. In the press release they also mention that they are now a not-for-profit Foundation. It sounds ambitious, but they have a Nobel prize winner, an astronaut, and several people from NASA on their board.” The actual selection process starts early next year.

Source: Over 1000 Volunteers For ‘Suicide’ Mission To Mars

Longest US Space Mission Planned For 2015

November 27th, 2012 11:29 admin View Comments

NASA

SchrodingerZ writes “Captain Scott Kelly, brother of former commander Mark Kelly, will embark on the United States’ longest manned space mission, set for 2015. Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko will spend an entire year on the orbiting International Space Station. The mission will be a first for NASA’s space program, but it is far from the world record. The longest recorded time in space was the 438-day mission of Russia’s Valery Polyakov, working on the Mir Space Station, 1994-1995. Kelly, a decorated Navy captain received degrees from State University of New York Maritime College and the University of Tennessee, and was the flight engineer for space station expedition 25, and commander of expedition 26 in 2010. ‘Kornienko hails from Russia’s Syzran, Kuibyshev, region and has worked in the space industry since 1986.’ The yearlong study on humans working in space will launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, spring 2015.”

Source: Longest US Space Mission Planned For 2015

NASA: Mission Accomplished, Kepler – Now Look Harder Still

November 16th, 2012 11:35 admin View Comments

NASA

cylonlover writes “It’s been more than three and a half years since the Kepler Space Telescope began its mission as humanity’s watcher for Earth-like planets outside of the Solar System. In that time, Kepler has done exactly what was asked of it: provide the data to help identify more than 2,300 exoplanet candidates in other star systems. And so NASA has announced the ‘successful completion’ of Kepler’s prime mission. There’s one nagging detail, though: we are yet to find a truly Earth-like planet. It’s time to alter the parameters of the search, which is why NASA has announced Kepler will now begin an extended mission that could last as long as four years.”

Source: NASA: Mission Accomplished, Kepler – Now Look Harder Still

Behind the Scenes At NASA’s Mission Control Center

November 1st, 2012 11:34 admin View Comments

NASA

willith writes “I was recently given the opportunity to spend several hours on the floor of Historic Mission Operations Control Room #2, at the Johnson Space Center in Houston. MOCR2 was used to control almost manned Gemini and Apollo mission, including Apollo 11 & 13. More, my tour guide was none other than famous Apollo mission controller Sy Liebergot, one of the fellows behind the solution that saved Apollo 13. I go in-depth on the role of the flight controller during Apollo, and focus on how and why Mission Control functioned, and I spend a lot of time talking about the consoles and how they worked. The feature includes a ton of anecdotes and stories from Mr. Liebergot about mission control in general, and about what he did during Apollo 12 & 13 specifically. I also put together a supplemental report that goes through each and every station and describes their Apollo-era layout.”

Source: Behind the Scenes At NASA’s Mission Control Center

Endeavour Arrives At California Science Center

October 14th, 2012 10:27 admin View Comments

Space

The final mission of the Endeavour has been completed. The shuttle has arrived at it’s final home, the California Science Center. From the article: “After a dramatic three-day parade through city streets, Endeavour arrived at its new home at the California Science Center shortly after 1 p.m. Sunday amid cheers from thousands gathered to witness a piece of history. ‘Mission 26 — Mission Accomplished,’ Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said at a news conference at Exposition Park, the shuttle rising behind him as a backdrop. The mayor was referencing the shuttle’s 25 space missions and its journey across the city. The 85-ton orbiter pulled up next to the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum and ground to a halt so that the mayor and others could officially mark its arrival at the park near the USC campus. ‘Today everyone in the city of Los Angeles is an astronaut,’ said L.A. Fire Department Chief Brian Cummings at the news conference.”

Source: Endeavour Arrives At California Science Center

$1 Billiion Dollar Mission To Reach the Earth’s Mantle

October 2nd, 2012 10:37 admin View Comments

Earth

black6host writes “Humans have reached the moon and are planning to return samples from Mars, but when it comes to exploring the land deep beneath our feet, we have only scratched the surface of our planet. This may be about to change with a $1 billion mission to drill 6 km (3.7 miles) beneath the seafloor to reach the Earth’s mantle — a 3000 km-thick layer of slowly deforming rock between the crust and the core which makes up the majority of our planet — and bring back the first ever fresh samples.”

Source: $1 Billiion Dollar Mission To Reach the Earth’s Mantle

YOYOYOOYOYOYO