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Posts Tagged ‘Louis’

Mini-Tornadoes For Generating Electricity

December 21st, 2012 12:32 admin View Comments

Power

cylonlover writes “Tornadoes generally evoke the destructive force of nature at its most awesome. However, what if all that power could be harnessed to produce cheaper and more efficient electricity? This is just what Canadian engineer Louis Michaud proposes to achieve, with an invention dubbed the ‘Atmospheric Vortex Engine‘ (or AVE). It works by introducing warm air into a circular station, whereupon the difference in temperature between this heated air and the atmosphere above creates a vortex – or controlled tornado, which in turn drives multiple wind turbines in order to create electricity. The vortex could be shut down by simply turning off the source of warm air. Michaud’s company, AVEtec Energy Corporation, reports that the system produces no carbon emissions, nor requires energy storage to function, and that further to this, the cost of energy generated could potentially be as low as US$0.03 per kilowatt hour.”

Source: Mini-Tornadoes For Generating Electricity

NBC Erases SNL Sketch From Digital Archive For Fear of Copyright Lawsuit

October 24th, 2012 10:51 admin View Comments

Music

M.Nunez writes with a tale of copyright woes. From the article: “The digital ‘Saturday Night Live’ archive does not feature a recent Bruno Mars sketch because it includes impersonations of pop singers and their chart-topping hits. Bruno Mars sings several songs that are not owned by NBC, so it can be presumed that the company refrained from uploading the sketch into its digital archive to avoid any legal issues. Convoluted music licensing laws have essentially erased the Bruno Mars sketch from the digital archives of SNL. In the short comedy sketch, Bruno Mars impersonates vocal performances by Billie Joe Armstrong (Green Day), Steven Tyler (Aerosmith), Katy Perry, Justin Bieber, Louis Armstrong, and Michael Jackson. The sketch cannot be found on NBC.com or Hulu, as a short clip or in either full editions of the episode.”

Source: NBC Erases SNL Sketch From Digital Archive For Fear of Copyright Lawsuit

The Case That Apple Should Buy Nokia

October 9th, 2012 10:24 admin View Comments

Businesses

Hugh Pickens writes “Nokia has seen better days. The Finnish phone maker continues to struggle to gain traction in a marketplace dominated by Apple and Android, and its new flagship device, the Windows-powered Lumia 920, failed to impress investors when it was announced last month, subsequently causing the company’s stock to dive. Now Tristan Louis argues that there are four good reasons Apple should dig into its deep pockets and buy Nokia. First Nokia has really powerful mapping technology. Apple Maps isn’t very good, and Apple has been feeling the heat from a critical tech press but Nokia has been doing maps ‘for a long time now, and they a href=”http://www.cultofmac.com/194130/why-apple-should-buy-nokia-to-fix-their-mapping-disaster/”>have access to even more data than Google.” Next, Nokia has a treasure chest of patents and as Apple’s recent smackdown of Samsung proves, the future of the mobile space ‘will be dictated by the availability and ownership of patents.’ Nokia’s exhaustive portfolio of patents might be worth as much as $6 billion to $10 billion, a drop in the bucket from Apple’s $100 billion war chest. Nokia could also help with TV . If Apple truly wants to dominate the TV arena, it’ll have to beam shows and movies to iPhones or iPads in real time, and that’s a field Nokia has some expertise in. Finally Microsoft has a lot riding on the release of Windows Phone 8, and Nokia is its primary launch partner. Buying Nokia would ‘knock Microsoft on its heels,’ says Forbes’ Upbin.”

Source: The Case That Apple Should Buy Nokia

A Glimpse At Piracy In the UK and Beyond

September 17th, 2012 09:32 admin View Comments

Music

Zocalo writes “The BBC has a fascinating look into the music download habits of the UK population based on stats compiled by Musicmetric. The stats, gathered through the monitoring of BitTorrent swarms and geo-locating the IPs, shows the hotspots for music copyright infringement across the UK and regional preferences for certain types of music. Some of the outliers are somewhat unusual though, suggesting some problems with the methodology or sample size, unless people on the Isle of Wight really do prefer trumpet-playing crooner Louis Armstrong to the likes of Rihanna and Ed Sheeran who top the lists nationwide. Not in the UK? There are some global stats on the ‘ Most pirated near you? tab‘ of the story. Better yet, if you want to crunch the numbers for yourself all of the data has been made available at the Musicmatch website under the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial ShareAlike license and a RESTful API to access the data (free for non-commercial use, but requiring an API token) is also available.”

Source: A Glimpse At Piracy In the UK and Beyond

Police Probing Theft of Millions of Pounds of Maple Syrup From Strategic Reserve

August 31st, 2012 08:41 admin View Comments

Canada

An anonymous reader writes with this bit from the Globe and Mail: “Quebec police are on the hunt for a sticky-fingered thief after millions of dollars of maple syrup vanished from a Quebec warehouse. The theft was discovered during a routine inventory check last week at the St-Louis-de-Blandford warehouse, where the syrup is being held temporarily. The Federation of Quebec Maple Syrup Producers, which is responsible for the global strategic maple syrup reserve, initially kept the news quiet, hoping it would help police solve the crime quickly.”

Source: Police Probing Theft of Millions of Pounds of Maple Syrup From Strategic Reserve

Why Mars Is Not the Limit For Human Space Flight

August 24th, 2012 08:02 admin View Comments

Mars

“Mars is not just the next or most accessible human destination, it is the ultimate one,” writes Louis Friedman, executive director emeritus of The Planetary Society. He says the concept of manned spaceflight is progressing so slowly, and robotic developments so swiftly, that Mars will be the first and last planet humans set foot on. “By the time human spaceflight technology is theoretically capable of journeys beyond Mars, humans in modern space systems will be virtual explorers interacting with the environments of distant worlds, but without the baggage of physical transportation or presence.” Mark Whittington disagrees, saying Friedman is demonstrating Clarke’s First Law, and that the history of human exploration is rife with periods of stagnation interrupted by technological achievement that led to swift progress.

Source: Why Mars Is Not the Limit For Human Space Flight

The Nation Is Losing Its Toolbox

July 24th, 2012 07:29 admin View Comments

United States

Hugh Pickens writes “Louis Uchitelle writes that in Aisle 34 of Home Depot is precut vinyl flooring, the glue already in place. In Aisle 26 are prefab windows, and if you don’t want to be your own handyman, head to Aisle 23 or Aisle 35, where a help desk will arrange for an installer, as mastering tools and working with one’s hands recede as American cultural values. ‘At a time when the American factory seems to be a shrinking presence, and when good manufacturing jobs have vanished, perhaps never to return, there is something deeply troubling about this dilution of American craftsmanship,’ writes Uchitelle. ‘Craftsmanship is, if not a birthright, then a vital ingredient of the American self-image as a can-do, inventive, we-can-make-anything people.’ Mass layoffs and plant closings have drawn plenty of headlines and public debate over the years, and they still occasionally do. But the damage to skill and craftsmanship — what’s needed to build a complex airliner or a tractor, or for a worker to move up from assembler to machinist to supervisor — has gone largely unnoticed. ‘In an earlier generation, we lost our connection to the land, and now we are losing our connection to the machinery we depend on,’ says Michael Hout. ‘People who work with their hands are doing things today that we call service jobs, in restaurants and laundries, or in medical technology and the like.’ The damage to American craftsmanship seems to parallel the precipitous slide in manufacturing employment. And manufacturing’s shrinking presence helps explain the decline in craftsmanship, if only because many of the nation’s assembly line workers were skilled in craft work. ‘Young people grow up without developing the skills to fix things around the house,’ says Richard T. Curtin. ‘They know about computers, of course, but they don’t know how to build them.’”

Source: The Nation Is Losing Its Toolbox

Paramount Claims Louis CK “Didn’t Monetize”

April 16th, 2012 04:50 admin View Comments

The Almighty Buck

Weezul writes “Paramount’s “Worldwide VP of Content Protection and Outreach” Al Perry has insinuated that Louis CK making $1 million in 12 days means he isn’t monetizing. Al Perry asserted that ‘copyright law gives creators the right to monetize their creations, and that even if people like Louis C.K. decide not to do so, that’s a choice and not a requirement.’ Bonus, Slashdot favorite Jonathan Coulton apparently grossed almost half a million last year.”

Source: Paramount Claims Louis CK “Didn’t Monetize”

Foxconn “Glad That Mike Daisey’s Lies Were Exposed”

March 19th, 2012 03:35 admin View Comments

China

theodp writes “Foxconn Technology Group, Apple’s largest supplier and the target of allegations of poor work conditions, welcomed a retraction of a This American Life radio program episode it said was based on lies. ‘I am happy that the truth prevails, I am glad that Mike Daisey’s lies were exposed,’ Louis Woo, a spokesman for Taipei-based Foxconn said. ‘People will have the impression that Foxconn is a bad company,’ Woo added, ‘so I hope they will come and find out for themselves‘. Foxconn also said that it has ‘no plans to take legal action’.”

Source: Foxconn “Glad That Mike Daisey’s Lies Were Exposed”

Nomad Planets: Stepping Stones To Interstellar Space?

March 13th, 2012 03:16 admin View Comments

Space

An anonymous reader writes “Ian O’Neill suggests in an opinion piece at Al Jazeera that brown dwarves and nomad planets (planets not orbiting any star) could be a much needed stepping stone on our way to foreign stars. Quoting the article: ‘In February, a fascinating paper was published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society detailing calculations on how many “nomad planets” the Milky Way must contain after estimating our galaxy’s mass from how much gravity it exerts on surrounding space. Scientists from the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology (KIPAC) had uncovered something surprising — there are likely many more planets in the Milky Way than stars. … Louis Strigari and his Kavli team calculated that there must be 100,000 planets for every star in the Milky Way (PDF). That’s a lot of planets! But how can this be? Every star can’t have tens of thousands of planets ranging from Pluto-sized to Jupiter-sized. This planetary “excess” actually suggests the existence of planets that were born without a star — nomad planets. … we need all the help we can get if we are to venture to another star, so these ultracool brown dwarfs could become much-needed “stepping stones” for future starships to refuel on their light-years of journey time. There may be the possibility that these sub-stellar objects may even become more desirable targets for interstellar travellers. After all, there may be dozens of these invisible objects between here and Proxima just waiting to be uncovered by the sophisticated infrared telescopes of the future; they’d certainly make for more accessible scientific curiosities.’”

Source: Nomad Planets: Stepping Stones To Interstellar Space?

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