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Posts Tagged ‘Internet’

DRONENET: An Internet of Drones

January 5th, 2013 01:40 admin View Comments

Transportation

In a series of posts on his blog, military theorist John Robb outlines what he thinks will be the next big thing — “as big as the internet,” as he puts it. It’s DRONENET: an internet of drones to be used as an automated delivery service. The drones themselves would require no futuristic technology. Modern quadrotor drones are available today for a few hundred dollars, and drone usage would be shared across an open, decentralized network. Robb estimates the cost for a typical delivery at about $0.25 every 10 miles, and points out that the drones would fit well alongside many ubiquitous technologies; the drone network shares obvious parallels with the internet, the drones would use GPS already-common GPS navigation, and the industry would mesh well with the open source hardware/software community. Finally, Robb talks about the standards required for building the DRONENET: “Simple rules for drone weight, dimensions, service ceiling, and speed. Simple rules for battery swap and recharging (from battery type, dimension, etc.). Simple rules for package containers. Simple rules for the dimensions and capabilities of landing pads. … Decentralized database and transaction system for coordinating the network. Rules for announcing a landing pad (information from GPS location and services provided) to the network. Rules for announcing a drone to the network (from altitude to speed to direction to destination). Cargo announcement to the network, weight, and routing (think: DNS routing). A simple system for allocating costs and benefits (a commercial overlay). This commercial system should handle everything from the costs of recharging a drone and/or swapping a battery to drone use.”

Source: DRONENET: An Internet of Drones

Worldwide IPv6 Adoption: Where Do We Stand Today?

January 4th, 2013 01:11 admin View Comments

The Internet

skade88 writes “IPv4 is much like a limited natural resource; it can’t last forever. The well of new IPv4 addresses is already running dry in many parts of the world. The solution to this problem, which was presented decades ago, is to switch to IPv6. With peak IPv4 far behind us, why do we still see limited IPv6 adoption? Ars takes a good look at where we are and where we are going with the future of IP addresses, the internet and you. Quoting: ‘As with all technology, IPv6 gets better and cheaper over time. And just like with houses, people prefer waiting rather than buying when prices are dropping. To make matters worse, if you’re the only one adopting IPv6, this buys you very little. You can only use the new protocol once the people you communicate with have upgraded as well. Worse still, you can’t get rid of IPv4 until everyone you communicate with has adopted IPv6. And the pain of the shrinking IPv4 supplies versus the pain of having to upgrade equipment and software varies for different groups of Internet users. So some people want to move to IPv6 and leave IPv4 behind sooner rather than later, but others plan on sticking with IPv4 until the bitter end. As a result, we have a nasty Nash equilibrium: nobody can improve their own situation by unilaterally adopting IPv6.’”

Source: Worldwide IPv6 Adoption: Where Do We Stand Today?

Ask Slashdot: Undoing an Internet Smear Campaign?

January 2nd, 2013 01:50 admin View Comments

The Internet

An anonymous reader writes “My fiancee is a professional writer. She has a great industry reputation and everyone that knows her loves her. But her ex-husband has maintained a number of websites in her name (literally, the URL is her name) that are filled with insane ravings and defamatory content. Have you ever had to deal with an internet smear campaign? The results float to the top of every Google or Bing search of her name. He currently lives abroad and cannot be served with legal papers. His websites are hosted overseas as well, and do not respond to conventional letters or petitions. Because of his freedom of speech rights, few U.S. courts will assert that his websites are truly libelous, either, and it’s still difficult to prove any real ‘damages’ are done by it. Still, we’d like to see them go away. I’m turning to the best community of geeks in the world: how do I deal with this given the limited options at my disposal?”

Source: Ask Slashdot: Undoing an Internet Smear Campaign?

FAA Device Rules Illustrate the Folly of a Regulated Internet

December 31st, 2012 12:12 admin View Comments

Government

First time accepted submitter cathyreisenwitz writes “The New York Times’ Bits blog has a great piece on the FAA’s inconvenient, outdated and unhelpful rules regarding electronic devices on planes: ‘Dealing with the F.A.A. on this topic is like arguing with a stubborn teenager. The agency has no proof that electronic devices can harm a plane’s avionics, but it still perpetuates such claims, spreading irrational fear among millions of fliers.’ The rules illustrate why we shouldn’t let the government regulate the internet: Government regulations are nearly always outdated and too cautious.”

Source: FAA Device Rules Illustrate the Folly of a Regulated Internet

New IE Vulnerability Used In Targeted Attacks; IE9, IE10 Users Safe

December 29th, 2012 12:47 admin View Comments

Internet Explorer

An anonymous reader writes “Criminals are using a new Internet Explorer security hole to attack Windows computers in targeted attacks, though the vulnerability could end up being more widely exploited. While IE9 and IE10 are not affected, versions IE6, IE7, and IE8 are. It’s great to see that the latest versions of IE are immune, but this new vulnerability is still bad news for Windows XP users and earlier since they cannot upgrade to more recent versions of Microsoft’s browser. “We are actively investigating reports of a small, targeted issue affecting Internet Explorer 6-8,” Dustin Childs of Microsoft Trustworthy Computing told TNW. “We will take appropriate action to help keep customers protected once our analysis is complete. People using Internet Explorer 9-10 are not impacted.”"

Source: New IE Vulnerability Used In Targeted Attacks; IE9, IE10 Users Safe

FCC Smooths the Path For Airlines’ In-Flight Internet

December 28th, 2012 12:52 admin View Comments

Government

The Washington Post reports on a development that may push Internet access on commercial aircraft from a pleasant luxury (but missing on most U.S. domestic flights) to commonplace. Writes the Post: “The Federal Communications Commission on Friday approved an application process for airlines to obtain broadband Internet licenses aboard their planes. Previously, airlines were granted permission on an ad hoc basis. Airlines need the FCC’s permission to tap into satellite airwaves while in flight that enable passengers to access the Internet. They also need permission from the Federal Aviation Administration, which oversees the safety of inflight Internet systems.” I hope that on-board Internet not only becomes the default, but that free advertising-backed access does, too; especially for short flights, the “24-hour pass” paid access I’ve seen on United and Delta is tempting, but too pricey.

Source: FCC Smooths the Path For Airlines’ In-Flight Internet

How ISPs Collude To Offer Poor Service

December 28th, 2012 12:06 admin View Comments

Businesses

alexander_686 writes “Bloomberg is running a series of articles from Susan Crawford about the stagnation of internet access in the U.S., and why consumers in America pay more for slower service. Quoting: ‘The two kinds of Internet-access carriers, wired and wireless, have found they can operate without competing with each other. The cable industry and AT&T-Verizon have divided up the world much as Comcast and Time Warner did; only instead of, “You take Philadelphia, I’ll take Minneapolis,” it’s, “You take wired, I’ll take wireless.” At the end of 2011, the two industries even agreed to market each other’s services.’ I am a free market type of guy. I do recognize the abuse that can come from natural monopolies that utilities tend to have, but I have never considered this type of collusion before. To fix the situation, Crawford recommends that the U.S. ‘move to a utility model, based on the assumption that all Americans require fiber-optic Internet access at reasonable prices.’”

Source: How ISPs Collude To Offer Poor Service

China Tightens Internet Restrictions

December 28th, 2012 12:45 admin View Comments

China

The NY Times reports China has once again stepped up its efforts to control the internet, passing a new set of rules by which internet users and ISPs must abide. In addition to requiring that users provide their real names to internet providers, the government says those providers are now more responsible for deleting or blocking posts that aren’t agreeable to the Chinese authorities. Quoting: “The new regulations, issued by the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress, allow Internet users to continue to adopt pseudonyms for their online postings, but only if they first provide their real names to service providers, a measure that could chill some of the vibrant discourse on the country’s Twitter-like microblogs. The authorities periodically detain and even jail Internet users for politically sensitive comments, such as calls for a multiparty democracy or allegations of impropriety by local officials. In recent weeks, Internet users in China have exposed a series of sexual and financial scandals that have led to the resignations or dismissals of at least 10 local officials. International news media have also published a series of reports in recent months on the accumulation of wealth by the family members of China’s leaders, and some Web sites carrying such reports … have been assiduously blocked, while Internet comments about them have been swiftly deleted. The regulations issued Friday build on a series of similar administrative guidelines and municipal rules issued over the past year. China’s mostly private Internet service providers have been slow to comply with them, fearing the reactions of their customers. The Standing Committee’s decision has much greater legal force, and puts far more pressure on Chinese Internet providers to comply more quickly and more comprehensively, Internet specialists said.”

Source: China Tightens Internet Restrictions

China Tightens Internet Restrictions

December 28th, 2012 12:45 admin View Comments

China

The NY Times reports China has once again stepped up its efforts to control the internet, passing a new set of rules by which internet users and ISPs must abide. In addition to requiring that users provide their real names to internet providers, the government says those providers are now more responsible for deleting or blocking posts that aren’t agreeable to the Chinese authorities. Quoting: “The new regulations, issued by the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress, allow Internet users to continue to adopt pseudonyms for their online postings, but only if they first provide their real names to service providers, a measure that could chill some of the vibrant discourse on the country’s Twitter-like microblogs. The authorities periodically detain and even jail Internet users for politically sensitive comments, such as calls for a multiparty democracy or allegations of impropriety by local officials. In recent weeks, Internet users in China have exposed a series of sexual and financial scandals that have led to the resignations or dismissals of at least 10 local officials. International news media have also published a series of reports in recent months on the accumulation of wealth by the family members of China’s leaders, and some Web sites carrying such reports … have been assiduously blocked, while Internet comments about them have been swiftly deleted. The regulations issued Friday build on a series of similar administrative guidelines and municipal rules issued over the past year. China’s mostly private Internet service providers have been slow to comply with them, fearing the reactions of their customers. The Standing Committee’s decision has much greater legal force, and puts far more pressure on Chinese Internet providers to comply more quickly and more comprehensively, Internet specialists said.”

Source: China Tightens Internet Restrictions

‘Connected’ TVs Mostly Used Just Like the Unconnected Kind

December 27th, 2012 12:01 admin View Comments

Displays

antdude writes The National Purchase Diary (NPD) Group Blog reports that ‘Internet Connected TVs Are Used To Watch TV, And That’s About All — The Internet connected high definition television (HDTV) screen has so far failed to break beyond the bounds of its TV-centric heritage, with little use for the big screen beyond the obligatory video services. But the connection is being used to provide access to a far wider variety of alternative sources for video content. The latest NPD Connected Intelligence Application & Convergence report highlights that nearly six out of ten consumers who own a connected HDTV are accessing Over-the-Top video services through the device.’ (Seen on DSL reports.)” Wired’s headline on a story based on the same information puts things more bluntly: “No One Uses Smart TV Internet Because It Sucks.”

Source: ‘Connected’ TVs Mostly Used Just Like the Unconnected Kind