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Posts Tagged ‘!infinite’

Feedly 8 Brings Tagging, Infinite Scrolling

November 29th, 2011 11:00 admin View Comments

feedly-150.jpgGoogle Reader may be one of the best things to happen to RSS/Atom feeds, but Feedly is definitely one of the best things to happen to Google Reader, and Feedly 8 makes it even better. With this release, Feedly adds tagging, “infinite” scrolling, and two new views.

The biggie, at least from my viewpoint, is the tagging. Feedly has always supported saving articles for later, but you just end up with a huge pile of items. Finding that really interesting piece on running a startup from last July can be tricky with no way to organize items except chronologically.

Tagging

tagging.jpgWith F8, Feedly now has a rudimentary tagging system so you can group articles. I say rudimentary because at the moment, it only seems to support a single tag per item. When I’m tagging items in Evernote or other systems, I often use two or more tags. (Like “tickler” for article ideas and a relevant topic like “javascript” or “hadoop.”) But at least now I can separate items into some sort of order, so that if I want to dig out a piece on Vim from six months ago it should be easier than scrolling through six months of saved items.

The other thing missing here is that you apparently can’t assign tags using Feedly’s excellent keyboard shortcuts. If you’re used to plowing through articles using the keyboard shortcuts, you’ll still have to slow down and get clicky to add a tag.

Tags are private now, but expect more goodies based around tagging with Feedly 9. According to the F8 announcement post, with Feedly 9 you’ll be able to “selectively publish and share your collections.” Sounds just a little like the old days of goodness with Delicious, before that service was sucked up and derailed after years of neglect by Yahoo. (Not that I’m bitter or anything.)

Views

Feedly has always had a number of different “views” you could use to browse your feeds. With Feedly 8, it adds a card view and a new titles view that displays more information for each item. The card view calls to mind a set of index cards, with the text-only posts just having the item title, summary and byline/publication info. Posts with graphics display all the summary info plus a random graphic from the post.

card-view-feedly.jpg

The so-called infinite view comes into play when you have a lot of items in your feeds. Instead of stopping at an arbitrary number of posts, you can simply keep scrolling through items as long as you have more posts to read.

If you haven’t tried Feedly before, this would be a good time to check it out. You don’t need to have a Google Reader account, there’s a default set of feeds you can skim with Feedly even if you’re not signed in. But I do recommend using it in conjunction with Google Reader. Note that Feedly syncs in real time with Google Reader, so changes made in Feedly should reflect in Google Reader as well.

The update is available immediately for Chrome and Safari, but the Firefox version is currently under review. Note that you can still install it, but you’ll be warned that it could “harm your computer.” For the cautious, I’ve installed Feedly 8 and thus far my computer seems unharmed.

Source: Feedly 8 Brings Tagging, Infinite Scrolling

Feedly 8 Brings Tagging, Infinite Scrolling

November 29th, 2011 11:00 admin View Comments

feedly-150.jpgGoogle Reader may be one of the best things to happen to RSS/Atom feeds, but Feedly is definitely one of the best things to happen to Google Reader, and Feedly 8 makes it even better. With this release, Feedly adds tagging, “infinite” scrolling, and two new views.

The biggie, at least from my viewpoint, is the tagging. Feedly has always supported saving articles for later, but you just end up with a huge pile of items. Finding that really interesting piece on running a startup from last July can be tricky with no way to organize items except chronologically.

Tagging

tagging.jpgWith F8, Feedly now has a rudimentary tagging system so you can group articles. I say rudimentary because at the moment, it only seems to support a single tag per item. When I’m tagging items in Evernote or other systems, I often use two or more tags. (Like “tickler” for article ideas and a relevant topic like “javascript” or “hadoop.”) But at least now I can separate items into some sort of order, so that if I want to dig out a piece on Vim from six months ago it should be easier than scrolling through six months of saved items.

The other thing missing here is that you apparently can’t assign tags using Feedly’s excellent keyboard shortcuts. If you’re used to plowing through articles using the keyboard shortcuts, you’ll still have to slow down and get clicky to add a tag.

Tags are private now, but expect more goodies based around tagging with Feedly 9. According to the F8 announcement post, with Feedly 9 you’ll be able to “selectively publish and share your collections.” Sounds just a little like the old days of goodness with Delicious, before that service was sucked up and derailed after years of neglect by Yahoo. (Not that I’m bitter or anything.)

Views

Feedly has always had a number of different “views” you could use to browse your feeds. With Feedly 8, it adds a card view and a new titles view that displays more information for each item. The card view calls to mind a set of index cards, with the text-only posts just having the item title, summary and byline/publication info. Posts with graphics display all the summary info plus a random graphic from the post.

card-view-feedly.jpg

The so-called infinite view comes into play when you have a lot of items in your feeds. Instead of stopping at an arbitrary number of posts, you can simply keep scrolling through items as long as you have more posts to read.

If you haven’t tried Feedly before, this would be a good time to check it out. You don’t need to have a Google Reader account, there’s a default set of feeds you can skim with Feedly even if you’re not signed in. But I do recommend using it in conjunction with Google Reader. Note that Feedly syncs in real time with Google Reader, so changes made in Feedly should reflect in Google Reader as well.

The update is available immediately for Chrome and Safari, but the Firefox version is currently under review. Note that you can still install it, but you’ll be warned that it could “harm your computer.” For the cautious, I’ve installed Feedly 8 and thus far my computer seems unharmed.

Source: Feedly 8 Brings Tagging, Infinite Scrolling

NPR’s New Pandora-Style “Infinite” Radio Player Now Available

November 15th, 2011 11:50 admin View Comments

The digital product team over at NPR is always busy tinkering away and creating new ways for people to consume the news organization’s rich library of content. Their latest innovation, called the Infinite Player, is a stripped-down, browser-based tool for listening to NPR content in a serendipitous, yet personalized fashion.

If the player’s interface reminds you of Pandora, it’s no accident. The team deliberately borrowed from personalized media services like Pandora, Flipboard and Zite when building out the Infinite Player. Its controls are sparse, containing only a few buttons. Among them are a pair of icons for voting stories up and down, much as one would on Pandora. In time, the player learns what you’re interested in and plays back content accordingly.

The Infinite Player gets its name from the fact that it plays content endlessly, or at least until the user tells it to stop. In that sense, it’s sort of like a real radio station. The modern twist comes in its ability to deliver audio content based on the listener’s preferences.

This experience provides more of an opportunity what the NPR team calls “distracted listening” – that is, consuming content while doing other things and not necessarily having to make any decisions about it (aside from voting it up or down, if you’re so inclined). This is in contrast to the type of “engaged listening” experience that podcasts and audio clips offer.

The player, which launched yesterday, is in beta mode and currently works only in Safari and Chrome. Its functionality is driven by HTML5 and JavaScript, rather than relying on Flash for playback. It doesn’t appear to be optimized for the iPad just yet, but it is a brand new feature and presumably the team is working on cross-device compatibility. You can give it a shot here.

npr-infinite-player.jpg

Source: NPR’s New Pandora-Style “Infinite” Radio Player Now Available

Carmack On ‘Infinite Detail,’ Integrated GPUs, and Future Gaming Tech

August 12th, 2011 08:20 admin View Comments

Graphics

Vigile writes “John Carmack sat down for an interview during Quakecon 2011 to talk about the future of technology for gaming. He shared his thoughts on the GPU hardware race (hardware doesn’t matter but drivers are really important), integrated graphics solutions on Sandy Bridge and Llano (with a future of shared address spaces they may outperform discrete GPUs) and of course some thoughts on ‘infinite detail’ engines (uninspired content viewed at the molecular level is still uninspired content). Carmack does mention a new-found interest in ray tracing, and how it will ‘eventually win’ the battle for rendering in the long run.”

Source: Carmack On ‘Infinite Detail,’ Integrated GPUs, and Future Gaming Tech

Escaping Infinite Loops

August 2nd, 2011 08:05 admin View Comments

Programming

twocentplain writes in with an MIT news release about Jolt, a research project designed to unfreeze software stuck in an infinite loop (for a subset of infinite loops). It uses a combination of static instrumentation (using LLVM) and a run time watchdog that checks the program state during loop iteration; when a duplicate state is detected it permits the user to take one a few actions to escape the loop. The authors claim it works well enough that the program can often continue operating properly. The original paper contains detailed case studies.

Source: Escaping Infinite Loops

Ex-Yahoo Facebook Group Update: We’re In!

October 6th, 2010 10:13 admin View Comments

“And now this post will be TechCrunched and the Internet will go into an infinite loop and explode from the sheer weight of navel gazing.”

3-2-1 … Nope. No explosions. Nothing.

Yup, still here.

For those out of the (infinite) loop, we just wrote a post about attempting to break into the rapidly exploding private Yahoo Alumni group on Facebook. And then we did, see above.

Source: Ex-Yahoo Facebook Group Update: We’re In!

Infinite Mario With Dynamic Difficulty Adjustment

September 8th, 2010 09:32 admin View Comments

bgweber writes “There’s been a lot of discussion about whether games should adapt to the skills of players. However, most current techniques limit adaptation to parameter adjustment. But if the parameter adaptation is applied to procedural content generation, then new levels can be generated on-line in response to a player’s skill. In this adaptation of Infinite Mario (with source [.JAR]), new levels are generated based on the performance of the player. What other gameplay mechanics are open for adaptation when games adapt to the skills of specific players?”

Source: Infinite Mario With Dynamic Difficulty Adjustment

Home-Built Turing Machine

March 26th, 2010 03:31 admin View Comments

stronghawk writes “The creator of the Nickel-O-Matic is back at it and has now built a Turing Machine from a Parallax Propeller chip-based controller, motors, a dry-erase marker and a non-infinite supply of shiny 35mm leader film. From his FAQ: ‘While thinking about Turing machines I found that no one had ever actually built one, at least not one that looked like Turing’s original concept (if someone does know of one, please let me know). There have been a few other physical Turing machines like the Logo of Doom, but none were immediately recognizable as Turing machines. As I am always looking for a new challenge, I set out to build what you see here.’”

Source: Home-Built Turing Machine

"Universal Jigsaw Puzzle" Hits Stores In Japan

December 10th, 2009 12:02 admin View Comments

Riktov writes “I came across this at a Tokyo toy store last week, and it’s one of the coolest things I’ve seen in a long time. Jigazo Puzzle is a jigsaw puzzle, but you can make anything with it. It has just 300 pieces which are all just varying shades of a single color, though a few have gradations across the piece; i.e., each piece is a generic pixel. Out of the box, you can make Mona Lisa, JFK, etc, arranging it according to symbols printed on the reverse side. But here’s the amazing thing: take a photo (for example, of yourself) with a cell-phone, e-mail it to the company, and they will send you back a pattern that will recreate that photo.

This article is in Japanese, but as they say, a few pictures are worth a million words. And 300 pixels are worth an infinite number of pictures.”

Source: "Universal Jigsaw Puzzle" Hits Stores In Japan

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