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Posts Tagged ‘immigration and customs enforcement’

Federal Officials Take Down 132 Websites In “Cyber Monday” Crackdown

November 26th, 2012 11:19 admin View Comments

Government

coondoggie writes “A team of world-wide law enforcement agencies took out 132 domain names today that were illegally selling counterfeit merchandise online. The group, made up of US Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) and law enforcement agencies from Belgium, Denmark, France, Romania, United Kingdom and the European Police Office (Europol), targeted alleged counterfeiters selling everything from professional sports jerseys, DVD sets, and a variety of clothing to jewelry and luxury goods.”

Source: Federal Officials Take Down 132 Websites In “Cyber Monday” Crackdown

US DOJ Drops Charges Against Two Seized Websites

August 30th, 2012 08:05 admin View Comments

The Courts

angry tapir writes “The U.S. Department of Justice has dropped its case against two Spanish websites that stream sports events nearly 17 months after U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement seized the sites and shut them down for alleged copyright violations. In a one-page brief to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York on Wednesday, U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara of the district said his office had dropped the case against Rojadirecta.com and Rojadirecta.org. ICE seized the two sites on Jan. 31, 2011, and the DOJ asked the court to order that Puerto 80 Projects, the owner of the sites, forfeit the sites to the U.S. government.”

Source: US DOJ Drops Charges Against Two Seized Websites

Feds Seized Website For a Year Without Piracy Proof

May 4th, 2012 05:20 admin View Comments

Piracy

bonch writes “U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement seized a hip-hop website based on RIAA claims of copyright infringement for prerelease music tracks. They held it for a year before giving it back due to lack of evidence. Unsealed court records (PDF) show that the government was repeatedly given time extensions to build a case against Dajaz1.com, but the RIAA’s evidence never came. The RIAA has declined to comment.”

Source: Feds Seized Website For a Year Without Piracy Proof

TVShack Creator’s US Extradition Approved

March 13th, 2012 03:27 admin View Comments

Piracy

chrb writes “British student Richard O’Dwyer, creator of the TVShack website, has had his extradition to the United States approved by Conservative Home Secretary Theresa May. Mr. O’Dwyer now has 14 days to appeal the decision. The extradition was requested by the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, which has accused O’Dwyer of aiding copyright infringement by publishing links to pirated content hosted on external sites.”

Source: TVShack Creator’s US Extradition Approved

Super Bowl Bust: Feds Grab 307 NFL Websites; $4.8M

February 2nd, 2012 02:58 admin View Comments

Security

coondoggie writes “Speaking at a National Football League press conference ahead of this weekend’s Super Bowl, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency said special agents this week seized a total of 307 websites and snatched up 42,692 items of phony Super Bowl-related memorabilia along with other counterfeit items for a total take of more than $4.8 million – up from $3.72 million last year.”

Source: Super Bowl Bust: Feds Grab 307 NFL Websites; $4.8M

US Government Seeks Extradition of UK Student For File-Sharing

January 13th, 2012 01:56 admin View Comments

Piracy

Gimble writes “The BBC reports that UK student Richard O’Dwyer has lost a legal battle to block his extradition to the U.S., where he faces copyright infringement charges for running a file sharing site (ruling). O’Dwyer operated the site ‘TV-Shack’ from 2007 until 2010, which didn’t offer any files itself, but posted links to streams and files hosted elsewhere. O’Dwyer was first arrested in June last year by British police acting on information from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The domestic investigation was subsequently dropped, but Mr. O’Dwyer was re-arrested in May on an extradition warrant to face charges in America.”

Source: US Government Seeks Extradition of UK Student For File-Sharing

Feds Return Mistakenly Seized Domain

December 8th, 2011 12:55 admin View Comments

Censorship

bs0d3 writes “Just over a year ago, Homeland Security’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) seized dozens of domain names as part of Operation in Our Sites. Among them was DaJaz1.com, a site from which Special Agent Andrew Reynolds said he’d downloaded pirated music. But there was a problem. Persistent reports suggested that the songs had been legally provided to the site by record labels for the specific purposes of distribution to fans, a point later raised by Senator Ron Wyden. One ‘leak’ even came from a boss at a major music label. Today, a year later, their domain was returned. The reason was because there was no probable cause and the site had never actually broken any laws or warranted a seizure. They are back in business and are displaying an anti-censorship, anti-PROTECT IP, and anti-SOPA banner on their website.”

Source: Feds Return Mistakenly Seized Domain

The EFF Reflects On ICE Seizing a Tor Exit Node

August 26th, 2011 08:10 admin View Comments

Electronic Frontier Foundation

An anonymous reader writes “Marcia Hofmann, senior staff attorney at the EFF, gives more information on the first known seizure of equipment in the U.S. due to a warrant executed against a private individual running a Tor exit node. ‘This spring, agents from Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) executed a search warrant at the home of Nolan King and seized six computer hard drives in connection with a criminal investigation. The warrant was issued on the basis of an Internet Protocol (IP) address that traced back to an account connected to Mr. King’s home, where he was operating a Tor exit relay.’ The EFF was able to get Mr King’s equipment returned, and Marcia points out that ‘While we think it’s important to let the public know about this unfortunate event, it doesn’t change our belief that running a Tor exit relay is legal.’ She also links to the EFF’s Tor Legal FAQ. This brings up an interesting dichotomy in my mind, concerning protecting yourself from the Big digital Brother: Running an open Wi-Fi hotspot, or Tor exit node, would make you both more likely to be investigated, and less likely to be convicted, of any cyber crimes.”

Source: The EFF Reflects On ICE Seizing a Tor Exit Node

US, UK Targeting Piracy Websites Outside Their Borders

July 4th, 2011 07:12 admin View Comments

Piracy

nk497 writes “The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency is going after piracy websites even if they aren’t hosted in the U.S., by targeting those with .net and .com domain names, which are managed by U.S. company Verisign. Meanwhile, a lawyer suggests even that [kind of connection] isn’t needed to take a site to court in the UK, saying as long as the content is directed at UK users, that’s connection enough to ensure jurisdiction.”

Source: US, UK Targeting Piracy Websites Outside Their Borders

First Challenge To US Domain Seizures Filed

June 13th, 2011 06:17 admin View Comments

Government

An anonymous reader writes “You may recall that the US government, mainly through Homeland Security’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement division (ICE) has been seizing domain names over the past year, based on bad evidence, even leading to the ‘accidental’ seizure of 84,000 sites. While it has taken some time, the first challenge has been filed to the domain seizures, by the company Puerto 80, who runs Rojadirecta, a Spanish internet forum that was seized because users linked to streaming sporting events. Rojadirecta was declared perfectly legal (twice!) in Spain, but the challenge obviously focuses on US law, and how the seizure was improper and did not meet the qualifications for a seizure, how the seizure violates the First Amendment by being improper prior restraint on protected speech, and how Rojadirecta is not guilty of criminal copyright infringement. This could represent a very important case in determining the government’s legal right to simply seize domain names.”

Source: First Challenge To US Domain Seizures Filed

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