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Posts Tagged ‘growth’

Dr. Rita Levi-Montalcini, Nobel Winner, Dies At 103

December 31st, 2012 12:53 admin View Comments

Science

SternisheFan writes “Nobel winner Dr. Rita Levi-Montalcini who discovered chemical tools that the body uses to direct cell growth and build nerves has died. She was 103. From the article: ‘Dr. Rita Levi-Montalcini, a Nobel Prize-winning neurologist who discovered critical chemical tools that the body uses to direct cell growth and build nerve networks, opening the way for the study of how those processes can go wrong in diseases like dementia and cancer, died on Sunday at her home in Rome. She was 103. Her death was announced by Mayor Gianni Alemanno of Rome. “I don’t use these words easily, but her work revolutionized the study of neural development, from how we think about it to how we intervene,” said Dr. Gerald D. Fishbach, a neuroscientist and professor emeritus at Columbia. Scientists had virtually no idea how embryo cells built a latticework of intricate connections to other cells when Dr. Levi-Montalcini began studying chicken embryos in the bedroom of her house in Turin, Italy, during World War II. After years of obsessive study, much of it at Washington University in St. Louis with Dr. Viktor Hamburger, she found a protein that, when released by cells, attracted nerve growth from nearby developing cells.’”

Source: Dr. Rita Levi-Montalcini, Nobel Winner, Dies At 103

The Trials and Tribulations of a Would-Be Facebook Employee

December 22nd, 2012 12:55 admin View Comments

Businesses

An anonymous reader writes “It may be hard for Facebook HR infrastructure to keep up with the rapid growth of the company, so scheduling and performing Skype screening interviews with the prospective new developers appears deteriorating into disorderly jumble. In a blog post, a recent candidate for a development job at Facebook has shared his excruciation at coordinating and then having this preliminary interview, pointing out the unhelpfulness of HR staff at Facebook during all stages of the process.”

Source: The Trials and Tribulations of a Would-Be Facebook Employee

Study Finds Similar Structures In the Universe, Internet, and Brain

November 25th, 2012 11:30 admin View Comments

The Internet

SternisheFan writes “The structure of the universe and the laws that govern its growth may be more similar than previously thought to the structure and growth of the human brain and other complex networks, such as the Internet or a social network of trust relationships between people, according to a new study. ‘By no means do we claim that the universe is a global brain or a computer,’ said Dmitri Krioukov, co-author of the paper, published by the Cooperative Association for Internet Data Analysis (CAIDA), based at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California, San Diego.’But the discovered equivalence between the growth of the universe and complex networks strongly suggests that unexpectedly similar laws govern the dynamics of these very different complex systems,’ Krioukov noted.”

Source: Study Finds Similar Structures In the Universe, Internet, and Brain

HTC Losing Ground Faster Than RIM or Nokia

October 26th, 2012 10:15 admin View Comments

Cellphones

zacharye writes “How bad is HTC’s current tailspin? So bad it makes Nokia look like a growth company. HTC’s handset volume declined by -43% in the autumn quarter vs. Nokia’s -23% volume decline. This is very interesting because HTC is using Android, the world’s most popular smartphone OS, that is powering 40% annualized growth among its vendors. Nokia is limping along with an unholy mix of the obsolete Symbian platform, the moribund S40 feature phone platform and a niche OS called Windows Phone.”

Source: HTC Losing Ground Faster Than RIM or Nokia

The Growth of Google Summer of Code

October 17th, 2012 10:30 admin View Comments

Open Source

I recently sat down with Chris DiBona to talk about the 15th anniversary of Slashdot. In addition to discussing the joys of heading an email campaign against spamming politicians, and the perils of throwing a co-worker’s phone into a bucket, even if you think that bucket is empty, we talked about the growth of Google Summer of Code. Below you’ll find his story of how a conversation about trying to get kids to be more active with computers in the summer has lead to the release of 55 million lines of code.

Source: The Growth of Google Summer of Code

Cancer-Detecting Bra Could One Day Surpass Mammograms In Accuracy

October 15th, 2012 10:40 admin View Comments

Idle

fangmcgee writes “Reno-based First Warning Systems is working on a new bra that could detect if you are developing breast cancer. Integrated sensors and a data controller regularly monitor your breasts and can watch for irregularities which may signal the growth of tumors. Tests so far are showing that the bra is far superior and may be able to detect cancerous growth up to 6 years sooner than self-exams or mammograms.”

Source: Cancer-Detecting Bra Could One Day Surpass Mammograms In Accuracy

Cancer-Detecting Bra Could One Day Surpass Mammograms In Accuracy

October 15th, 2012 10:40 admin View Comments

Idle

fangmcgee writes “Reno-based First Warning Systems is working on a new bra that could detect if you are developing breast cancer. Integrated sensors and a data controller regularly monitor your breasts and can watch for irregularities which may signal the growth of tumors. Tests so far are showing that the bra is far superior and may be able to detect cancerous growth up to 6 years sooner than self-exams or mammograms.”

Source: Cancer-Detecting Bra Could One Day Surpass Mammograms In Accuracy

The Explosive Growth of 3D Printing

October 1st, 2012 10:17 admin View Comments

Technology

MojoKid writes “If you’ve ever attended a World Maker Faire, the first thing that strikes you is how organic the whole scene is. Inventors, creators, and engineers from all walks of life have their gadgets, science projects, and creations on display for all to see. Some of the creations you see on display range from downright amazing to completely bizarre. One of the big attractions, a technology area that has experienced explosive growth, is the land of 3D Printing. MakerBot took the open source RepRap 3D replicator project mainstream back in 2009 with the release of the Cup Cake CNC machine, then came the Thing-o-Matic and then a little bot called Replicator. With each iteration, improvements in process and technology are bringing better, more capable 3D printers to market, from MakerBot’s new Replicator 2, to new players in the field like Solidoodle, Up!3D, Ultimaker, and Tinkerines. To watch a 3D printer in action is like witnessing art, science and engineering all working together in glorious unison.”

Source: The Explosive Growth of 3D Printing

Why American Internet Service Is Slow and Expensive

September 25th, 2012 09:00 admin View Comments

The Internet

An anonymous reader writes “Reporter David Cay Johnston was interviewed recently for his new book, which touches on why America’s Internet access is slow, expensive, and retarding economic growth. The main reason? Regulatory capture. It seems the telecommunication companies have rewritten the regulatory rules in their favor. In regards to the fees that were meant to build a fast Internet, Johnston speculates those fees went to build out cellular networks. ‘The companies essentially have a business model that is antithetical to economic growth,’ he says. ‘Profits go up if they can provide slow Internet at super high prices.’”

Source: Why American Internet Service Is Slow and Expensive

Has Plant Life Reached Its Limits?

September 22nd, 2012 09:31 admin View Comments

Earth

hessian writes with this news from the New York Times: “Since 2000, Dr. [Steven] Running and his colleagues have monitored how much plant growth covers terra firma, using two NASA satellites in the agency’s Earth Observing System. After they crunched the numbers, combining the current monitoring system’s data with satellite observations dating back to 1982, they noticed that terrestrial plant growth, also known as net primary production, remained relatively constant. Over the course of three decades, the observed plant growth on dry land has been about 53.6 petagrams of carbon each year, Dr. Running writes in the article. This suggests that plants’ overall productivity — including the corn that humans grow and the trees people log for paper products — is changing little now, no matter how mankind tries to boost it, he said.”

Source: Has Plant Life Reached Its Limits?

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