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Posts Tagged ‘Florida’

Can Fotobar Make Polaroid Relevant Again?

January 6th, 2013 01:38 admin View Comments

Businesses

The years have not been kind to Polaroid. The company has gone through a couple of bankruptcies, and has tried to reinvent itself with a number of less-than-popular products including: an Android powered “smart camera”, and a digital camera that incorporates instant printing. They hope to reverse their fortunes now by partnering with a startup called Fotobar and plan “to open a chain of retail stores where customers can come in and print out their favorite pictures from their mobile phones. The first is scheduled to open in February in Delray Beach, Florida, and the goal is to open 10 locations across the country before the year is out.”

Source: Can Fotobar Make Polaroid Relevant Again?

Want To Buy a Used Spaceport?

January 6th, 2013 01:32 admin View Comments

Businesses

Hugh Pickens writes writes “Want to buy a 15,000-foot landing strip? How about a place to assemble rocket ships or a parachute-packing plant? Have we got a deal for you. The Orlando Sentinel reports that with the cleanup and wind-down of the shuttle program, NASA is quietly holding a going-out-of-business sale for the its space-shuttle facilities including Launch Pad 39A, where shuttles were launched; space in the Vehicle Assembly Building, the iconic 526-foot-tall structure first used to assemble Saturn V-Apollo rockets; the Orbiter Processing Facilities, essentially huge garages where the shuttles were maintained; Hangar N and its high-tech test equipment; the launch-control center; and various other buildings and chunks of undeveloped property. ‘The facilities out here can’t be in an abandoned state for long before they become unusable,’ says Joyce Riquelme, NASA’s director of KSC planning and development. ‘So we’re in a big push over the next few months to either have agreements for these facilities or not.’ The process is mostly secret, because NASA has agreed to let bidders declare their proposals proprietary, keeping them out of the view of competitors and the public. Frank DiBello, thinks the most attractive facilities are those that can support launches that don’t use the existing pads at KSC and adjacent Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. ‘Anything that still has cleaning capabilities or satellite-processing capabilities, the parachute facility, the tile facility, the OPF, all three of them, they have real value to the next generation of space activity,’ says Frank DiBello, President of Space Florida, an Independent Special District of the State of Florida, created to foster the growth and development of a sustainable and world-leading space industry in Florida. ‘If the infrastructure helps you reach market, then it has value. If it doesn’t, then it’s just a building, it’s just a launchpad, and nobody wants it.’”

Source: Want To Buy a Used Spaceport?

Legislators: ‘Spaceport America Could Become a Ghost Town’

January 4th, 2013 01:05 admin View Comments

Space

RocketAcademy writes “A group of New Mexico legislators is warning that the $200-million Spaceport America ‘could become a ghost town, with tumbleweeds crossing the runways‘ if trial lawyers succeed in blocking critical liability legislation. The warning came in a letter to the Albuquerque Journal [subscription or free trial may be required]. Virgin Galactic has signed a lease to become the spaceport’s anchor tenant, but may pull out if New Mexico is unable to provide liability protection for manufacturers and part suppliers, similar to legislation already passed by Texas, Colorado, Florida, and Virginia. The proposed legislation is also similar to liability protection which New Mexico offers to the ski industry. An eclectic group of business and civic interests has formed the Save Our Spaceport Coalition to support passage of the liability reform legislation, which is being fought by the New Mexico Trial Lawyers Association.”

Source: Legislators: ‘Spaceport America Could Become a Ghost Town’

Pirate Radio Station In Florida Jams Automotive Electronics

December 28th, 2012 12:05 admin View Comments

Piracy

New submitter titanium93 writes “For months, dozens of people could not use their keyless entry systems to unlock or start their cars when parked in the vicinity of the eight-story Regents bank building in Hollywood, FL. Once the cars were towed to the dealership for repair, the problem went away. The problem resolved itself when police found equipment on the bank’s roof that was broadcasting a bootleg radio station. A detective and an FCC agent found the equipment hidden underneath an air conditioning chiller. The man who set up the station has not been found, but he faces felony charges and fines of at least $10,000 if he is caught. The radio station was broadcasting Caribbean music around the clock on 104.7 FM.”

Source: Pirate Radio Station In Florida Jams Automotive Electronics

Money Python: Florida Contest Offers Rewards In 2013 Everglades Python Hunt

December 9th, 2012 12:41 admin View Comments

The Almighty Buck

Press2ToContinue writes “Dubbed the Python Challenge, the month-long contest will award $1,000 for the longest python and $1,500 for the most pythons caught between Jan. 12 and Feb. 10 in any of four hunting areas north of Everglades National Park and at the Big Cypress National Preserve. Pythons have been spreading through the Everglades for years, posing a threat to the sensitive ecosystem by preying on native species. Some estimates put their number in the tens of thousands. Last year, 272 pythons were removed from the wild, state figures show.”

Source: Money Python: Florida Contest Offers Rewards In 2013 Everglades Python Hunt

Tour the Turn of the Century Electrotherapy Museum (Video)

December 6th, 2012 12:55 admin View Comments

Medicine

Since he was a teenager, Jeff Behary’s been interested in the work of Nikola Tesla, and has been collecting antique electric devices of a particular kind: ones that send electricity through the human body to effect medical benefits, many of which do so with the aid of Tesla coils. Tesla’s not the only inventor involved, of course, but his influence overlapped and widely influenced the golden age of electrotherapy. Behary’s day job as a machinist means he has the skills to rehabilitate and restore these aging beasts, too, along with a growing family of related devices. He’s assembled them now, in West Palm Beach, Florida, into the Turn of the Century Electrotherapy Museum. This is a museum of my favorite kind: home-based and intimate, but with serious depth. Though it’s open only by appointment, arranging a visit there is worth it, whether you’re otherwise part of the Tesla community or not. Behary knows his collection inside and out, with the kind of deep knowledge it takes to fabricate replacement parts and revamp the internal wiring. The devices themselves are accessible, with original and restored pieces up close and personal — you need to be mindful about which ones are humming and crackling at any given moment. (There’s also an archive with books, papers, and other effects relating to Tesla and other electric pioneers, not to mention glowing tubes that predate the modern vacuum tube, and the oldest known surviving Tesla coils, recovered from beneath their maker’s Boston mansion. Electrotherapy is the organizing principle, but not the extent of this assembly.) And while Behary isn’t fooled by all the therapeutic claims made by some machines’ makers about running current through your limbs or around your body, he also doesn’t discount them all, either, and points out that some of them really do affect the body as claimed. Yes, he’s tried most of the machines himself, though he admits he’s never dared taking the juice of his personal Tesla-powered electric chair. View the first video for a tour of part of this astounding collection; the second video is an interview with Jeff Behary.

Source: Tour the Turn of the Century Electrotherapy Museum (Video)

The Science of Roadkill

December 4th, 2012 12:03 admin View Comments

Earth

Hugh Pickens writes “Sarah Harris writes that roadkill may not be glamorous, but wildlife ecologist Danielle Garneau says dead critters carry lots of valuable information providing an opportunity to learn about wildlife and pinpoint migratory patterns, invasive species, and predatory patterns. ‘We’re looking at a fine scale at patterns of animal movement — maybe we can pick up migratory patterns, maybe we can see a phenology change,’ says Garneau. ‘And also, in the long term, if many of these animals are threatened or they’re in a decline, the hope would be that we could share this information with people who could make changes.’ Garneau turns students out into the world to find dead animals, document them and collect the data using a smartphone app RoadkillGarneau and she has already received data from across New York, as well as Vermont, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Florida and Colorado. Participants take photos of the road kill, and the app uploads them through EpiCollect, which pinpoints the find on the map. Participants can then update the data to include any descriptors of the animal such as its species; sex; how long the dead animal had been there; if and when it was removed; the weather conditions; and any predators around it. ‘People talk a lot about technology cutting us off from nature,’ says Garneau. ‘But I found that with the road kill project, it’s the opposite. You really engage with the world around you — even if it is a smelly skunk decaying on the side of the road.’”

Source: The Science of Roadkill

Splashtop’s Cliff Miller Talks About Their New Linux App (Video)

December 3rd, 2012 12:58 admin View Comments

Android

Yes, you can now have full remote access to your home computer or a server at work that’s running Ubuntu Linux. Really any Linux distro, although only Ubuntu is formally supported by Splashtop. What? You say you already control your home and work Linux computers from your Android tablet with VNC? That there’s a whole bunch of Android VNC apps out there already? And plenty for iOS, too? You’re right. But Cliff says Splashtop is better than the others. It can play video at a full 30 frames per second, and has low enough latency (depending on your connection) that you can play video games remotely in between taking care of that list of server issues your boss emailed to you. Or perhaps, in between work tasks, you take a dip in the ocean, because you’re working from the beach, not from a stuffy office. It seems that work and living locations get a little more remote from each other every year, and Splashtop is helping to make that happen. This video interview is, itself, an example of how our world has gotten flatter; Cliff was in China and I was in Florida. The connection wasn’t perfect, but the fact that we could have this conversation at all is a wonder. Please note, too, that while Cliff Miller is now Chief Marketing Officer for Splashtop, he was also the founder and first CEO of TurboLinux, so he is not new to Linux. And Splashtop is the company that supplied the “instant on” Linux OS a lot of computer manufacturers bundled with their Windows computers for a few years. Now, of course, they’re focusing on the remote desktop, and seem to be making a go of it despite heavy competition in that market niche.

Source: Splashtop’s Cliff Miller Talks About Their New Linux App (Video)

NASA Cancels Nanosat Challenge

November 29th, 2012 11:06 admin View Comments

NASA

RocketAcademy writes “NASA has canceled funding for the Nano-Satellite Launch Challenge, a $2-million prize competition that was intended to promote development of a low-cost dedicated launch system for CubeSats and other small satellites. The cancellation is a setback for small satellite developers, many of whom have satellites sitting on the shelf waiting for a launch, and the emerging commercial launch industry. The Nano-Satellite Launch Challenge was being run by NASA and Space Florida as part of NASA’s troubled Centennial Challenges program. The sudden cancellation of the Launch Challenge, before the competition even began, is calling NASA’s commitment to Centennial Challenges into doubt.

Source: NASA Cancels Nanosat Challenge

With NCLB Waiver, Virginia Sorts Kids’ Scores By Race

November 13th, 2012 11:32 admin View Comments

Education

According to a story at Northwest Public Radio, the state of Virginia’s board of education has decided to institute different passing scores for standardized tests, based on the racial and cultural background of the students taking the test. Apparently the state has chosen to divide its student population into broad categories of black, white, Hispanic, and Asian — which takes painting with a rather broad brush, to put it mildly. From the article (there’s an audio version linked as well): “As part of Virginia’s waiver to opt out of mandates set out in the No Child Left Behind law, the state has created a controversial new set of education goals that are higher for white and Asian kids than for blacks, Latinos and students with disabilities. … Here’s what the Virginia state board of education actually did. It looked at students’ test scores in reading and math and then proposed new passing rates. In math it set an acceptable passing rate at 82 percent for Asian students, 68 percent for whites, 52 percent for Latinos, 45 percent for blacks and 33 percent for kids with disabilities.” (If officially determined group membership determines passing scores, why stop there?) Florida passed a similar measure last month.

Source: With NCLB Waiver, Virginia Sorts Kids’ Scores By Race

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