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Posts Tagged ‘electricity’

Mini-Tornadoes For Generating Electricity

December 21st, 2012 12:32 admin View Comments

Power

cylonlover writes “Tornadoes generally evoke the destructive force of nature at its most awesome. However, what if all that power could be harnessed to produce cheaper and more efficient electricity? This is just what Canadian engineer Louis Michaud proposes to achieve, with an invention dubbed the ‘Atmospheric Vortex Engine‘ (or AVE). It works by introducing warm air into a circular station, whereupon the difference in temperature between this heated air and the atmosphere above creates a vortex – or controlled tornado, which in turn drives multiple wind turbines in order to create electricity. The vortex could be shut down by simply turning off the source of warm air. Michaud’s company, AVEtec Energy Corporation, reports that the system produces no carbon emissions, nor requires energy storage to function, and that further to this, the cost of energy generated could potentially be as low as US$0.03 per kilowatt hour.”

Source: Mini-Tornadoes For Generating Electricity

Solar Panels For Every Home?

December 14th, 2012 12:10 admin View Comments

Power

Hugh Pickens writes “David Crane and Robert F.Kennedy Jr. write in the NY Times that with residents of New Jersey and New York living through three major storms in the past 16 months and suffering sustained blackouts, we need to ask whether it is really sensible to power the 21st century by using an antiquated and vulnerable system of copper wires and wooden poles. Some have taken matters into their own hands, purchasing portable gas-powered generators to give themselves varying degrees of grid independence. But these dirty, noisy and expensive devices have no value outside of a power failure and there is a better way to secure grid independence for our homes and businesses: electricity-producing photovoltaic panels installed on houses, warehouses and over parking lots, wired so that they deliver power when the grid fails. ‘Solar panels have dropped in price by 80 percent in the past five years and can provide electricity at a cost that is at or below the current retail cost of grid power in 20 states, including many of the Northeast states,’ write Crane and Kennedy. ‘So why isn’t there more of a push for this clean, affordable, safe and inexhaustible source of electricity?’ First, the investor-owned utilities that depend on the existing system for their profits have little economic interest in promoting a technology that empowers customers to generate their own power. Second, state regulatory agencies and local governments impose burdensome permitting and siting requirements that unnecessarily raise installation costs. While it can take as little as eight days to license and install a solar system on a house in Germany, in the United States, depending on your state, the average ranges from 120 to 180 days.”

Source: Solar Panels For Every Home?

Flexible, Fiber-Optic Solar Cell Could Be Woven Into Clothing

December 7th, 2012 12:10 admin View Comments

Power

MrSeb writes “An international team of engineers, physicists, and chemists have created the first fiber-optic solar cell. These fibers are thinner than human hair, flexible, and yet they produce electricity, just like a normal solar cell. The U.S. military is already interested in weaving these threads into clothing, to provide a wearable power source for soldiers. In essence, the research team started with optical fibers made from glass — and then, using high-pressure chemical vapor deposition, injected n-, i-, and p-type silicon into the fiber, turning it into a solar cell (abstract). Functionally, these silicon-doped fiber-optic threads are identical to conventional solar cells, generating electricity from the photovoltaic effect. Whereas almost every solar cell on the market is crafted out of 2D, planar amorphous silicon on a rigid/brittle glass substrate, though, these fiber-optic solar cells have a 3D cross-section and retain the glass fiber’s intrinsic flexibility. The lead researcher, John Badding of Penn State University, says the team has already produced ‘meters-long fiber,’ and that their new technique could be used to create ‘bendable silicon solar-cell fibers of over 10 meters in length.’ From there, it’s simply a matter of weaving the thread into a fabric.”

Source: Flexible, Fiber-Optic Solar Cell Could Be Woven Into Clothing

New Skin? A Plastic That Heals Itself, Conducts Electricity, and is Sensitive To Touch

November 13th, 2012 11:43 admin View Comments

Germany Exports More Electricity Than Ever Despite Phasing Out Nuclear Energy

November 9th, 2012 11:56 admin View Comments

Power

An anonymous reader writes “Der Spiegel reports that Germany has exported more electricity this year than ever before, despite beginning to phase out nuclear power. In the first three quarters of 2012, Germany sent 12.3 terawatt hours of electricity across its borders. The country’s rapid expansion into renewable energy is credited with the growth. However, the boost doesn’t come without a price. The German government’s investments into its new energy policy will end up costing hundreds of billions of dollars over the next two decades, and it still relies on imports for its natural gas needs. It also remains to be seen whether winter will bring power shortages. Is Germany a good example of forward-looking energy policy?”

Source: Germany Exports More Electricity Than Ever Despite Phasing Out Nuclear Energy

Why Worms In the Toilet Might Be a Good Idea

October 5th, 2012 10:46 admin View Comments

Earth

derekmead writes “Billions worldwide still don’t have access to proper sanitation, and those of that do still require a ton of water and electricity to keep waste flowing. A French company is offering one solution: Use turd-eating worms to compost waste right at the source. Ecosphere Technologies has developed an outhouse that, rather than relying on chemicals like a port-a-john, relies on about a pound of red wiggler worms. A new installation in Quebec uses imported worms, placed inside of a mixture of dung and straw underneath to toilet, to devour feces delivered to them by a conveyor belt system. (When someone uses the toilet, pee filters through sand to wash away, while a pedal allows the user to transport their poo to the worm space.) The whole system uses no water or electricity, and a series of passive vents allegedly keeps the toilet smelling great. The company claims it can be used 10,000 times without servicing, which is far better than what a port-a-potty can boast, although with a current price tag of $40k for the worm system, port-a-potties are still a lot cheaper.”

Source: Why Worms In the Toilet Might Be a Good Idea

Electric Car Environmental Impact: Power Source Matters

October 5th, 2012 10:50 admin View Comments

Power

another random user writes with news of a study from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, which looked into the environmental impact of electric vehicles — not just how they do when driven, but how they are produced and by what means they are charged. The study pointed out that the production of EVs has twice as much of an environmental impact as the production of typical gas-powered cars, which must be taken into account when comparing the two. Also, they say it’s important to consider the source of the electricity used to charge the vehicles. In places like Europe, where a good chunk of the electricity comes from renewable sources, EVs do indeed provide a benefit to the environment. However, “In regions where fossil fuels are the main sources of power, electric cars offer no benefits and may even cause more harm.” The study says, “It is counterproductive to promote electric vehicles in regions where electricity is primarily produced from lignite, coal or even heavy oil combustion.”

Source: Electric Car Environmental Impact: Power Source Matters

Microsoft Pollutes To Avoid Fines

September 25th, 2012 09:22 admin View Comments

Microsoft

An anonymous reader writes “Microsoft’s Quincy data center, physical home of Bing and Hotmail, was fined $210,000 last year because the data center used too little electricity. To avoid similar penalties for ‘underconsumption of electricity’ this year, the data center burned through $70,000 worth of electricity in three days.”

Source: Microsoft Pollutes To Avoid Fines

How Internet Data Centers Waste Power

September 23rd, 2012 09:28 admin View Comments

Power

Rick Zeman writes “The New York Times has extensively surveyed and analyzed data center power usage and patterns. At their behest, the consulting firm McKinsey & Company analyzed energy use by data centers and found that, on average they were using only 6 percent to 12 percent of the electricity powering their servers to perform computations. The rest was essentially used to keep servers idling and ready in case of a surge in activity that could slow or crash their operations. ‘Worldwide, the digital warehouses use about 30 billion watts of electricity, roughly equivalent to the output of 30 nuclear power plants.’ In other words, ‘A single data center can take more power than a medium-size town.’ This is the price being paid to ensure everyone has instant access to every email they’ve ever received, or for their instant Facebook status update. Data Center providers are finding that they can’t rack servers fast enough to provide for users’ needs: A few companies say they are using extensively re-engineered software and cooling systems to decrease wasted power. Among them are Facebook and Google, which also have redesigned their hardware. Still, according to recent disclosures, Google’s data centers consume nearly 300 million watts and Facebook’s about 60 million watts. Many of these solutions are readily available, but in a risk-averse industry, most companies have been reluctant to make wholesale change, according to industry experts.”

Source: How Internet Data Centers Waste Power

Australian Smart Meter Data Shared Far and Wide

September 22nd, 2012 09:02 admin View Comments

Australia

New submitter ferrisoxide.com writes “In Victoria (Australia), detailed information about electricity customers’ power usage, which gives insights into when a house is occupied, is being shared with third parties including mail houses, debt collectors, data processing analysts and government agencies.”

Source: Australian Smart Meter Data Shared Far and Wide

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