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Posts Tagged ‘e reader’

Rivalry Building Between Amazon and Google

December 25th, 2012 12:35 admin View Comments

Google

Amazon and Google, both giants in the online business world, started out as separate entities with two very different agendas. As each has grown into an empire, the overlapping areas of business between the two companies has grown as well. But with both companies moving strongly into the electronic device market, cloud services, and Amazon now building out its advertising network, they find themselves increasingly at odds, and 2013 may bring more direct battles.”Amazon wants to be the one place where you buy everything. Google wants to be the one place where you find everything, of which buying things is a subset. So when you marry those facts I think you’re going to see a natural collision,” said VC partner Chi-hua Chien. Adds Reuters, “Not long after Bezos learned of Google’s catalog plans, Amazon began scanning books and providing searchable digital excerpts. Its Kindle e-reader, launched a few years later, owes much of its inspiration to the catalog news, the executive said. Now, Amazon is pushing its online ad efforts, threatening to siphon revenue and users from Google’s main search website.”

Source: Rivalry Building Between Amazon and Google

Will Tablets Kill Off e-Readers?

December 14th, 2012 12:34 admin View Comments

Books

Nerval’s Lobster writes “Are e-readers doomed? A research note earlier this week from IHS iSuppli suggested that, after years of solid growth, the e-book reader market was ‘on an alarmingly precipitous decline’ thanks to the rise of tablets. The firm suggested that e-reader sales had declined from 23.2 million units in 2011 to 14.9 million this year — around 36 percent, in other words. The note blames tablets: ‘Single-task devices like the ebook are being replaced without remorse in the lives of consumers by their multifunction equivalents, in this case by media tablets.’ Even Amazon and Barnes & Noble, the reigning champs of the e-reader marketplace, have increasingly embraced full-color tablets as the best medium for selling their digital products. Backed by enormous cloud-based libraries that offer far more than just e-books, these devices are altogether more versatile than grayscale e-readers, provided their users want to do more than just read plain text.”

Source: Will Tablets Kill Off e-Readers?

Will Tablets Kill Off e-Readers?

December 14th, 2012 12:34 admin View Comments

Books

Nerval’s Lobster writes “Are e-readers doomed? A research note earlier this week from IHS iSuppli suggested that, after years of solid growth, the e-book reader market was ‘on an alarmingly precipitous decline’ thanks to the rise of tablets. The firm suggested that e-reader sales had declined from 23.2 million units in 2011 to 14.9 million this year — around 36 percent, in other words. The note blames tablets: ‘Single-task devices like the ebook are being replaced without remorse in the lives of consumers by their multifunction equivalents, in this case by media tablets.’ Even Amazon and Barnes & Noble, the reigning champs of the e-reader marketplace, have increasingly embraced full-color tablets as the best medium for selling their digital products. Backed by enormous cloud-based libraries that offer far more than just e-books, these devices are altogether more versatile than grayscale e-readers, provided their users want to do more than just read plain text.”

Source: Will Tablets Kill Off e-Readers?

Amazon Kindle Paperwhite Jailbroken

October 6th, 2012 10:26 admin View Comments

Books

hypnosec writes “Amazon’s latest Kindle Paperwhite is now officially jailbroken, giving users the ability to do things like turn their eReaders into weather station displays, or connect serially to a Raspberry Pi. To jailbreak the Paperwhite, the user needs to copy a file over to the root directory of the e-Reader and restart the device. The Kindle Paperwhite jailbreak is based on a previously known hack used on the Kindle Touch.”

Source: Amazon Kindle Paperwhite Jailbroken

Amazon Debuts Kindle Paperwhite, Kindle Fire HD In 2 Sizes

September 6th, 2012 09:05 admin View Comments

Handhelds

Nerval’s Lobster writes “Amazon used a Sept. 6 event in California to debut a range of products, including a backlit Kindle e-reader with a higher-resolution screen, an updated Kindle Fire, and the new Kindle Fire HD in two screen sizes. First, Bezos showed off a new version of the Kindle e-reader, the Kindle Paperwhite, complete with a backlit, higher-resolution screen (221 pixels-per-inch and 25 percent more contrast, according to Amazon). The device weighs 7.5 ounces and is 9.1mm thin; battery life is rated at eight weeks, and the screen brightness is adjustable. He then showed off the updated Kindle Fire, before moving to the Kindle Fire HD, which features a choice of 7-inch or 8.9-inch screens, dual stereo speakers with Dolby Digital Plus, two antennas for better W-iFi pickup, and a Texas Instruments OMAP 4470 processor (which Bezos claimed could out-perform the Tegra 3). The Kindle Fire HD’s 7-inch version will retail for $199 and ship Sept. 14, while the 8.9-inch version will cost $299 and ship Nov. 20. An 8.9-inch, 4G LTE-enabled version with 32GB storage will be available starting Nov. 20 for $499, paired with a $49.99-a-year data plan.”

Source: Amazon Debuts Kindle Paperwhite, Kindle Fire HD In 2 Sizes

Microsoft Said to Be Readying a Tablet of Its Own

June 15th, 2012 06:48 admin View Comments

For years Microsoft has left it to hardware manufacturers to build the smartphones, tablets and PCs running its software. Not anymore. According to published reports, the company plans to unveil a tablet of its own in Los Angeles on Monday.

According to reports in The New York Times and elsewhere, the device will run a new version of Windows and mark the first time Microsoft has sold its own computer, assuming one categorizes the Xbox as a video-game console. But others have speculated the new device will be more of an entertainment-oriented e-reader, perhaps not running Windows at all.

Strategic Shift

The move – originally reported by The Wrap – would mark a major strategic change for Microsoft, conceding that its old business model that reaped billions over almost four decades is falling apart in a world that is quickly becoming dominated by tablets and smartphones.

A Microsoft tablet also implies that Apple has it right with its model of tightly controlling software and hardware with the Mac, iPhone and iPad. Such control has made it possible for Apple to provide customers with a combination of industrial designs and user experiences that have yet to be matched in the Windows world.

Apple Envy Is Contagious

Microsoft is not the only company with Apple envy. Google too has abandoned its software-only approach with the $12.5 billion acquisition last year of mobile phone maker Motorola Mobility.

Given that Apple is now the most highly valued company in the world, it’s no surprise that more competitors are trying to emulate its business model.

But there are important differences. Even with its own tablet, Microsoft would continue selling Windows to hardware manufacturers, just as Google continues to make Android available to a wide variety of manufacturers. This dual approach, though, puts software makers in the uncomfortable position of creating hardware that competes with their software customers.

A Spotty Record

Microsoft also has a spotty record in building consumer hardware. While the Xbox is a success today, it took years for Microsoft to take it there. Microsoft’s Zune music player failed to win many fans in the company’s bid to unseat the Apple iPod. The product line was discontinued last year. And in 2011, Microsoft killed its Courier tablet project before launching it.

Nevertheless, Microsoft has little choice but to do something dramatic. Apple iPad sales are clearly cutting into the PC market, and there are no signs that trend is going to stop.

Whither Intel?

The Microsoft tablet is expected to run Windows RT, the Windows 8 version built specifically for tablets running ARM processors, not the Intel chips that power PCs, according to The Times. ARM chips power the vast majority of tablets and smartphones today.

If Microsoft has indeed chosen ARM, the next question concerns the impact on longtime partner Intel, which is also trying hard to transition from PCs to mobile devices. If Microsoft has decided ARM is better, then what effect would that have on other tablet makers?

Bottom line: Microsoft’s failure to keep the PC at the center of the tech universe is shaking up the industry’s old guard. And it’s far from clear how a Microsoft tablet will end the chaos.

Source: Microsoft Said to Be Readying a Tablet of Its Own

Microsoft Said to Be Readying a Tablet of Its Own

June 15th, 2012 06:48 admin View Comments

For years Microsoft has left it to hardware manufacturers to build the smartphones, tablets and PCs running its software. Not anymore. According to published reports, the company plans to unveil a tablet of its own in Los Angeles on Monday.

According to reports in The New York Times and elsewhere, the device will run a new version of Windows and mark the first time Microsoft has sold its own computer, assuming one categorizes the Xbox as a video-game console. But others have speculated the new device will be more of an entertainment-oriented e-reader, perhaps not running Windows at all.

Strategic Shift

The move – originally reported by The Wrap – would mark a major strategic change for Microsoft, conceding that its old business model that reaped billions over almost four decades is falling apart in a world that is quickly becoming dominated by tablets and smartphones.

A Microsoft tablet also implies that Apple has it right with its model of tightly controlling software and hardware with the Mac, iPhone and iPad. Such control has made it possible for Apple to provide customers with a combination of industrial designs and user experiences that have yet to be matched in the Windows world.

Apple Envy Is Contagious

Microsoft is not the only company with Apple envy. Google too has abandoned its software-only approach with the $12.5 billion acquisition last year of mobile phone maker Motorola Mobility.

Given that Apple is now the most highly valued company in the world, it’s no surprise that more competitors are trying to emulate its business model.

But there are important differences. Even with its own tablet, Microsoft would continue selling Windows to hardware manufacturers, just as Google continues to make Android available to a wide variety of manufacturers. This dual approach, though, puts software makers in the uncomfortable position of creating hardware that competes with their software customers.

A Spotty Record

Microsoft also has a spotty record in building consumer hardware. While the Xbox is a success today, it took years for Microsoft to take it there. Microsoft’s Zune music player failed to win many fans in the company’s bid to unseat the Apple iPod. The product line was discontinued last year. And in 2011, Microsoft killed its Courier tablet project before launching it.

Nevertheless, Microsoft has little choice but to do something dramatic. Apple iPad sales are clearly cutting into the PC market, and there are no signs that trend is going to stop.

Whither Intel?

The Microsoft tablet is expected to run Windows RT, the Windows 8 version built specifically for tablets running ARM processors, not the Intel chips that power PCs, according to The Times. ARM chips power the vast majority of tablets and smartphones today.

If Microsoft has indeed chosen ARM, the next question concerns the impact on longtime partner Intel, which is also trying hard to transition from PCs to mobile devices. If Microsoft has decided ARM is better, then what effect would that have on other tablet makers?

Bottom line: Microsoft’s failure to keep the PC at the center of the tech universe is shaking up the industry’s old guard. And it’s far from clear how a Microsoft tablet will end the chaos.

Source: Microsoft Said to Be Readying a Tablet of Its Own

Microsoft Invests $300 Million In Nook e-Readers

April 30th, 2012 04:56 admin View Comments

Android

First time accepted submitter NGTechnoRobot writes “In a turn for the books the BBC reports that Microsoft’s have invested £300 million in Barnes and Nobles Nook e-reader. The new Nook reader will integrate with Microsoft’s yet to be released Windows 8 operating system. From the article:’ The deal could make Barnes and Noble’s Nook e-book reader available to millions of new customers, integrating it with the Microsoft’s new Windows 8 operating system. The as-yet unnamed new company will be 82.4% owned by Barnes and Noble, with Microsoft getting a 17.6% stake’ Guess the lawsuits over folks.”

Source: Microsoft Invests $300 Million In Nook e-Readers

Kindle Fire Grabs Over Half of the U.S. Android Tablet Market

April 28th, 2012 04:03 admin View Comments

Android

New submitter DillyTonto writes “Amazon got shelled by analysts and the press after releasing a buggy first iteration of the Fire edition of the Kindle e-reader. Three weeks later the Kindle Fire owned 14 percent of the whole market for tablets. Three months later, more than half of all Android tablets sold in the U.S. are seven-inch Kindle Fires, despite a huge bias among buyers for 10-inch tablets. How could a heavily modded e-reader beat full-size tablets by major PC vendors? It’s cheaper than any other tablet or e-reader on the market, for one thing. Also important is its focus on being an e-reader, ‘because people buy hardware to have access to one app or function, then take the other things it can do as an additional benefit.’”

Source: Kindle Fire Grabs Over Half of the U.S. Android Tablet Market

Amazon Is Thinking About Real-World Stores

February 6th, 2012 02:28 admin View Comments

bezos-kindle-fire-150x150.jpgGood E-Reader reports today that Amazon plans to launch a retail store in its hometown of Seattle “within the next few months.” It will be a small boutique emphasizing its Kindle e-readers and physical copies of its Amazon Exclusives book titles. It will also stock accessories for Kindles, such as cases, screen protectors and USB chargers.

It’s not a new rumor (it dates as far back as 2009), and it would be a departure from Amazon’s strategy thus far. In December, LAUNCH reported the retail store rumor, adding that Amazon plans to sell its own branded merchandise. Amazon is better known for threatening real-world retail than for promoting it. But Amazon’s moves in the past few months make the strategy seem more sensible.

The $199 Kindle Fire is an important service for Amazon’s digital content, but it needs to be in physical hands first. That’s why Amazon cut deals to put the Kindle family in over 16,000 partner stores over the holidays.

Amazon’s key competitor, Barnes & Noble, already has hundreds of its own stores, and they have their own showroom for the Nook readers and tablets, so the boutique model reported by Good E-Reader sounds reasonable.

Did the retail boost work for Amazon? Who knows? As usual, Amazon did not disclose how many Kindles it sold last quarter with any kind of specificity. Amazon typically spins statistics that sound good, but it won’t provide hard numbers about devices.

kindlefamily.jpg

Devices are not Amazon’s core business; content is. Kindles are sold at a loss, and Amazon makes the money back on books, movies, apps and other media. The Kindle is a delivery mechanism, and putting the devices in stores would give customers a chance to try out the interface.

Amazon has avoided sales taxes by remaining a purely online retailer, giving its customers the incentive of the lowest price. But lately, sales taxes on online purchases have started to seem inevitable, as Amazon’s deal with the state of California shows. Once Amazon resigns itself to sales taxes, that’s one fewer reason not to bring its retail might into physical stores.

Source: Amazon Is Thinking About Real-World Stores

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