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Posts Tagged ‘Don’

PC Games To Watch For In 2013

January 1st, 2013 01:07 admin View Comments

PC Games (Games)

An anonymous reader writes “PC Gamer has put together a huge list of PC games that are due to come out in 2013. They’ve broken out the lists by genre, and each list is pretty long. It looks like a good starting point for finding the games you want to keep an eye on. Here are some highlights: Star Wars 1313: ‘Early glimpses suggest the game will ignore lightsabers and force powers in favor of gadgetry and guns, and the claims are for a more grounded and gritty fiction, instead of the fruity pan-galactic melodrama to which we are accustomed.’ The Elder Scrolls Online: ‘The real reason to watch The Elder Scrolls Online is the talent behind it – the ex-Mythic developers responsible for the innovative Warhammer: Age of Reckoning and, before that, Dark Age of Camelot. Don’t write off the old-school MMO just yet.’ Mars: War Logs: ‘Say it with me: a cyberpunk RPG set on Mars. That’s all you need to know.’ Ring Runner: ‘Missions challenge you to escape exploding trenches, battle bosses bigger than your screen, race against NPC pilots and engage in spectacular space skirmishes in an engine modeled on the laws of Newtonian physics.’ There will also be new installments of Dragon Age, SimCity, Grand Theft Auto, StarCraft, Command & Conquer, and Everquest.”

Source: PC Games To Watch For In 2013

Steve Jobs Was Wrong About Touchscreen Laptops

December 1st, 2012 12:12 admin View Comments

Displays

theodp writes “Don’t believe everything Steve Jobs and Tim Cook tell you, advises The Verge’s Sean Hollister. Gunshy of touchscreen laptops after hearing the two Apple CEOs dismiss the technology (Jobs: ‘Touch surfaces don’t want to be vertical.’ Cook: ‘You can converge a toaster and a refrigerator, but those things are probably not gonna be pleasing to the user.’), Hollister was surprised to discover that Windows 8 touchscreen laptops actually don’t suck and that the dreaded ‘Gorilla Arm Syndrome’ did not materialize. ‘The more I’ve used Windows 8, despite its faults, the more I’ve become convinced that touchscreens are the future — even vertical ones,’ writes Hollister. ‘We’ve been looking at this all wrong. A touchscreen isn’t a replacement for a keyboard or mouse, it’s a complement.’ Echoing a prediction from Coding Horror’s Jeff Atwood that ‘it is only a matter of time before all laptops must be touch laptops,’ Hollister wouldn’t be surprised at all if Apple eventually embraces-and-extends the tech: ‘Microsoft might have validated the idea, but now Apple has another chance to swoop in, perfecting and popularizing the very interface that it strategically ridiculed just two years ago. It wouldn’t be the first time. After all, how many iPad minis come with sandpaper for filing fingers down?’”

Source: Steve Jobs Was Wrong About Touchscreen Laptops

Why Don’t Camels Have Diabetes or High Blood Pressure?

November 14th, 2012 11:57 admin View Comments

MOOC Mania

November 10th, 2012 11:37 admin View Comments

Education

theodp writes “Online education has had a fifty-year road to ‘overnight’ success. MIT Technology Review calls the emergence of free online education, particularly massive open online courses (MOOCs), The Most Important Education Technology in 200 Years. ‘If you were asked to name the most important innovation in transportation over the last 200 years,’ writes Antonio Regalado, ‘you might say the combustion engine, air travel, Henry Ford’s Model-T production line, or even the bicycle. The list goes on. Now answer this one: what’s been the single biggest innovation in education? Don’t worry if you come up blank. You’re supposed to.’ Writing about MOOC Mania in the Communications of the ACM, Moshe Y. Vardi worries that ‘the enormous buzz about MOOCs is not due to the technology’s intrinsic educational value, but due to the seductive possibilities of lower costs.’ And in MOOCs Will Eat Academia, Vivek Haldar writes, ‘MOOCs will almost certainly hollow out the teaching component of universities as it stands today…But all is not lost, because the other thing universities do is research, and that is arguably as important, if not more, than teaching.’ So, are MOOCs the best thing since sliced bread, or merely the second coming of 1920s Postal Course Mania?”

Source: MOOC Mania

Do Recreational Drugs Help Programmers?

November 8th, 2012 11:22 admin View Comments

Medicine

jfruh writes “Among the winners of last night’s election: marijuana users. Voters in both Washington and Colorado approved referenda that legalized marijuana for recreational use, though the drug remains illegal under federal law. There’s been a long-standing debate among programmers as to whether recreational drugs, including pot and hallucinagens like LSD, can actually help programmers code. Don’t forget, there was a substantial overlap between the wave of computer professionals who came of age in the ’60s and that era’s counterculture.” (There’s even a good book on that topic.)

Source: Do Recreational Drugs Help Programmers?

US Government: You Don’t Own Your Cloud Data So We Can Access It At Any Time

November 2nd, 2012 11:40 admin View Comments

Cloud

New submitter jest3r writes “On Tuesday the EFF filed a brief proposing a process for the Court in the Megaupload case to hold the government accountable for the actions it took (and failed to take) when it shut down Megaupload’s service and denied third parties access to their property. Many businesses used Megaupload’s cloud service to store and share files not related to piracy. The government is calling for a long, drawn-out process that would require individuals or small companies to travel to courts far away and engage in multiple hearings just to get their own property back. Additionally, the government’s argument that you lose all your property rights by storing your data on the cloud could apply to Amazon’s S3 or Google Apps or Apple iCloud services as well (see page 4 of their filing).”

Source: US Government: You Don’t Own Your Cloud Data So We Can Access It At Any Time

72% of Xbox 360 Gamers Approve of “More Military Drone Strikes”

October 25th, 2012 10:53 admin View Comments

The Military

An anonymous reader writes “During the latest presidential debate, Xbox 360 owners were being polled live, as the debate was progressing, on a number of different questions, and asked to answer ‘Yes,’ ‘No,’ or ‘Don’t Know’ using their gamepad. Out of these questions, one particular question produced a surprising result: Xbox 360 owners were asked ‘Do you support more use of drone aircraft to attack suspected terrorists?’ 20% answered this question with ‘No’. 8% answered ‘Don’t know.’ And a whopping 72% answered the question ‘Yes.’ This raises an interesting question in and of itself: Is the average Xbox 360 player at all aware that drone strikes in countries like Pakistan cause a serious number of civilian deaths on a regular basis? Or do Xbox 360 gamers live in a parallel, game-inspired universe, where a real world ‘Drone Strike’ is something seriously cool, just like it is cool to use it in popular games like Call of Duty? In other words, does playing simulated war games like COD on a game console on a daily basis, and enjoying these games, cause gamers to become blinkered to the at times seriously dire real world consequences of using military tactics like drone strikes for real?”

Source: 72% of Xbox 360 Gamers Approve of “More Military Drone Strikes”

AOL’s New Alto Client Is Visual Email, and You Don’t Need a New Address

October 18th, 2012 10:06 admin View Comments

America Online

pigrabbitbear writes “AOL, still looking to reboot itself from the dialup days, is shooting to actually change the way we deal with email. The company’s new service, called Alto, isn’t a new email client. You don’t have to sign up for yet another email address, because as David Temkin, AOL’s senior VP of mail said, ‘We need another email address like we need a hole in the head.’ Instead, Alto, which is in limited release starting today, is designed to be an intelligent aggregator of the email accounts you already have.”

Source: AOL’s New Alto Client Is Visual Email, and You Don’t Need a New Address

We Don’t Need More Highways

October 6th, 2012 10:25 admin View Comments

Transportation

Hugh Pickens writes “When it comes to infrastructure, politicians usually prefer shiny new projects over humdrum repairs. A brand-new highway is exciting: There’s a ribbon-cutting, and there’s less need to clog up existing lanes with orange cones and repair crews. So it’s not surprising that 57 percent of all state highway funding goes toward new construction, often stretching out to the suburbs, even though new roads represent just 1.3 percent of the overall system. Now Brad Plumer writes in the Washington Post that many transportation reformers think this is a wrong-headed approach and that we should focus our dollars on fixing and upgrading existing infrastructure rather than continuing to build sprawling new roads). UCLA economist Matthew Kahn and the University of Minnesota’s David Levinson made a more detailed case for a “fix-it first” strategy. They noted that, at the moment, federal highway spending doesn’t get subjected to strict cost-benefit analysis, and governments often build new roads when they arguably shouldn’t (PDF). And that’s to say nothing of data suggesting that poor road conditions are a “significant factor” in one-third of all fatal crashes, and cause extra wear and tear on cars.”

Source: We Don’t Need More Highways

Schneier: We Don’t Need SHA-3

September 25th, 2012 09:04 admin View Comments

Encryption

Trailrunner7 writes with this excerpt from Threatpost: “For the last five years, NIST, the government body charged with developing new standards for computer security, among other things, has been searching for a new hash function to replace the aging SHA-2 function. Fives years is a long time, but this is the federal government and things move at their own pace in Washington, but NIST soon will be announcing the winner from the five finalists that were chosen last year. Despite the problems that have cropped up with some versions of SHA-2 in the past and the long wait for the new function, there doesn’t seem to be much in the way of breathless anticipation for this announcement. So much so, in fact, that Bruce Schneier, a co-author of one of the finalists not only isn’t hoping that his entry wins, he’s hoping that none of them wins. … It’s not because Schneier doesn’t think the finalists are worthy of winning. In fact, he says, they’re all good and fast and perfectly capable. The problem is, he doesn’t think that the world needs a new hash function standard at all. SHA-512, the stronger version of the SHA-2 function that’s been in use for more than a decade, is still holding up fine, Schneier said, which was not what cryptographers anticipated would be the case when the SHA-3 competition was conceived. ‘I expect SHA-2 to be still acceptable for the foreseeable future. That’s the problem. It’s not like AES. Everyone knew that DES as dead — and triple-DES was too slow and clunky — and we needed something new. So when AES appeared, people switched as soon as they could. This will be different,’ Schneier said via email.”

Source: Schneier: We Don’t Need SHA-3

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