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Posts Tagged ‘domain’

Turkish Registrar Enabled Phishing Attacks Against Google

January 3rd, 2013 01:32 admin View Comments

Google

tsu doh nimh writes “Google and Microsoft today began warning users about active phishing attacks against Google’s online properties. The two companies said the attacks resulted from a fraudulent digital certificate that was mistakenly issued by a domain registrar run by TURKTRUST Inc., a Turkish domain registrar. Google said that on Dec. 24, 2012, its Chrome Web browser detected and blocked an unauthorized digital certificate for the ‘.google.com’ domain. ‘TURKTRUST told us that based on our information, they discovered that in August 2011 they had mistakenly issued two intermediate CA certificates to organizations that should have instead received regular SSL certificates,’ Google said in a blog post today. Microsoft issued an advisory saying it is aware of active attacks using one of the fraudulent digital certificates issued by TURKTRUST, and that the fraudulent certificate could be used to spoof content, perform phishing attacks, or perform man-in-the-middle attacks against virtually any domain. The incident harkens back to another similar compromise that happened around the same time-frame. In September 2011, Dutch certificate authority Diginotar learned that a security breach at the firm had resulted in the fraudulent issuing of certificates.”

Source: Turkish Registrar Enabled Phishing Attacks Against Google

What Could Have Been In the Public Domain Today, But Isn’t

January 1st, 2013 01:09 admin View Comments

Media

An anonymous reader writes with an article from Duke Law on what would have entered the public domain today were it not for the copyright extensions enacted in 1978. From the article: “What could have been entering the public domain in the US on January 1, 2013? Under the law that existed until 1978, works from 1956. The films Godzilla, King of the Monsters!, The Best Things in Life Are Free, Forbidden Planet, The Ten Commandments, and Around the World in 80 Days; the stories 101 Dalmations and Phillip K. Dick’s The Minority Report; the songs ‘Que Sera, Sera’ and ‘Heartbreak Hotel’, and more. What is entering the public domain this year? Nothing. And Rick Falkvinge shares his predictions for what the copyright monopoly will try this year. As a bit of a music fan, excessive copyright hits home often: the entire discographies of many artists I like have been out of print for at least a decade. Should copyright even be as long as in the pre-1978 law? Is the Berne Convention obsolete and in need of breaking to actually preserve cultural history?

Source: What Could Have Been In the Public Domain Today, But Isn’t

ICANN Raffle Sets gTLD Processing Order

December 18th, 2012 12:23 admin View Comments

The Internet

judgecorp writes “ICANN has held a raffle to determine in what order it will examine new domain name applications. This doesn’t guarantee applicants will win the generic top-level domain (gTLD) they have set their hearts on, as the applications still have to be considered. There may be competition, or objections such as the South American governments’ objection to Amazon’s .amazon bid. None of the first batch is an English language domain, and the first one likely to make it through all the hurdles is an application by the Vatican, for a domain spelling ‘catholic’ in Chinese.”

Source: ICANN Raffle Sets gTLD Processing Order

Zoe Lofgren Wants To Slow Down Domain Seizures By ICE & DOJ

December 18th, 2012 12:50 admin View Comments

Government

GovTechGuy writes “Rep. Zoe Lofgren sat down with Roll Call to discuss her proposal to slow down the seizure of domain names accused of piracy by the federal government. Lofgren turned to Reddit for help formulating the bill, and also discussed whether her colleagues in Congress know enough about technology to make informed decisions on tech policy.”

Source: Zoe Lofgren Wants To Slow Down Domain Seizures By ICE & DOJ

Hotmail & Yahoo Mail Using Secret Domain Blacklist

December 13th, 2012 12:15 admin View Comments

Censorship

Frequent contributor Bennett Haselton writes: “Hotmail and Yahoo Mail are apparently sharing a secret blacklist of domain names such that any mention of these domains will cause a message to be bounced back to the sender as spam. I found out about this because — surprise! — some of my new proxy site domains ended up on the blacklist. Hotmail and Yahoo are stonewalling, but here’s what I’ve dug up so far — and why you should care.” Read on for much more on how Bennett figured out what’s going on, and why it’s a hard problem to solve.

Source: Hotmail & Yahoo Mail Using Secret Domain Blacklist

Federal Officials Take Down 132 Websites In “Cyber Monday” Crackdown

November 26th, 2012 11:19 admin View Comments

Government

coondoggie writes “A team of world-wide law enforcement agencies took out 132 domain names today that were illegally selling counterfeit merchandise online. The group, made up of US Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) and law enforcement agencies from Belgium, Denmark, France, Romania, United Kingdom and the European Police Office (Europol), targeted alleged counterfeiters selling everything from professional sports jerseys, DVD sets, and a variety of clothing to jewelry and luxury goods.”

Source: Federal Officials Take Down 132 Websites In “Cyber Monday” Crackdown

Brazil and Peru Dispute .Amazon TLD

November 21st, 2012 11:41 admin View Comments

Government

judgecorp writes “Amazon.com could lose the .amazon domain, as Brazil and Peru have disputed the retailer’s application to ICANN, backed by other South American governments, who want to protect use of that domain for ‘purposes of public interest related to the protection, promotion, and awareness raising on issues related to the Amazon biome.’”

Source: Brazil and Peru Dispute .Amazon TLD

Free Registrar co.cc Goes the Way of the Dodo

November 15th, 2012 11:16 admin View Comments

The Internet

First time accepted submitter Nexus Unplugged writes “Free domain provider co.cc seems to have quietly and mysteriously disappeared. No official explanation has yet been provided, but a cached copy suggest that they stopped accepting new registrations some time ago. Speculation, however, seems to come to a single conclusion. From the article: ‘Due to its free nature (and it’s $10 for as many as you want), Co.CC was abused and used for scams and spamming and was even de-listed by Google at one point although they did re-enable it. Getting back to the article on hand a few days ago Co.CC seems to have removed its DNS records which ultimately has stops its own site from working and every sub domain it provided.’ It’s worth noting that free domains are still easily obtainable from places like DotTK.”

Source: Free Registrar co.cc Goes the Way of the Dodo

CyanogenMod Domain Hijacked

November 14th, 2012 11:26 admin View Comments

Android

An anonymous reader writes “The team behind CyanogenMod, one of the most popular community-driven, Android-based operating systems for phones and tablets, has announced that they’re moving to Cyanogenmod.org after their .com domain was held ransom by a community member. He had been in control of the .com domain name for some time, but the team found out he was impersonating Cyanogen to make deals with community sites. When they removed his access to other parts of the CM infrastructure, he demanded $10,000 to relinquish control of the domain and threatened to change the DNS entries. When they refused to pay, he went through with it. The team is now disputing control of the domain with ICANN. They said, ‘We will continue to be open about the what, when, how, but unfortunately, we may never know the “why” – though greed comes to mind. The team itself has not made a profit off of CM and that is not our goal. But to have one of our own betray the community like this is beyond our comprehension.’”

Source: CyanogenMod Domain Hijacked

Mega Finds New Home, Dotcom Says

November 12th, 2012 11:25 admin View Comments

Piracy

hypnosec writes “Kim Dotcom has revealed that Megaupload’s successor Mega, which is reportedly launching on January 20, 2012, will be operating through a new domain name Mega.co.nz. Through a tweet Dotcom announced that Mega has found a new home and that the new domain name is protected by the law. Dotcom also revealed that lobbyists won’t be able to do anything about this as “Judges are not influenced by politics in New Zealand“. Recent announcements about Mega’s domain – Me.ga didn’t go as planned following a decision by the Government of Gabon to suspend the domain name. Dotcom had announced at the time that despite the blockage, Mega would launch as planned.”

Source: Mega Finds New Home, Dotcom Says

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