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Book Review: Metasploit The Penetration Tester’s Guide

September 14th, 2011 09:15 admin View Comments

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eldavojohn writes “The Metasploit Framework has come a long way and currently allows just about anyone to configure and execute exploits effortlessly. Metasploit: The Penetration Tester’s Guide takes current documentation further and provides a valuable resource for people who are interested in security but don’t have the time or money to take a training class on Metasploit. The highlights of the book rest on the examples provided to the reader as exercises in exploiting several older versions of operating systems like Windows XP and Ubuntu while at the same time avoiding triggering antivirus or detection. The only weak point of this book is that a couple chapters refer the reader to external texts (on stacks and registers) in order to meet requirements for crafting exploits. The book also gives the reader a brief warning on ethics as many of these exploits and techniques would most likely work on many sites and networks. If you’re wondering how seemingly inexperienced groups like lulzsec constantly claim victims, this would be an excellent read.” Keep reading for the rest of eldavojohn’s review.

Metasploit The Penetration Tester’s Guide
author David Kennedy, Jim O’Gorman, Devon Kearns, and Mati Aharoni
pages 300
publisher No Starch Press, Inc.
rating 10/10
reviewer eldavojohn
ISBN 978-1593272883
summary A thorough guide to penetration testing with the Metasploit Framework.

Source: Book Review: Metasploit The Penetration Tester’s Guide

Book Review: Metasploit The Penetration Tester’s Guide

September 14th, 2011 09:15 admin View Comments

Image

eldavojohn writes “The Metasploit Framework has come a long way and currently allows just about anyone to configure and execute exploits effortlessly. Metasploit: The Penetration Tester’s Guide takes current documentation further and provides a valuable resource for people who are interested in security but don’t have the time or money to take a training class on Metasploit. The highlights of the book rest on the examples provided to the reader as exercises in exploiting several older versions of operating systems like Windows XP and Ubuntu while at the same time avoiding triggering antivirus or detection. The only weak point of this book is that a couple chapters refer the reader to external texts (on stacks and registers) in order to meet requirements for crafting exploits. The book also gives the reader a brief warning on ethics as many of these exploits and techniques would most likely work on many sites and networks. If you’re wondering how seemingly inexperienced groups like lulzsec constantly claim victims, this would be an excellent read.” Keep reading for the rest of eldavojohn’s review.

Metasploit The Penetration Tester’s Guide
author David Kennedy, Jim O’Gorman, Devon Kearns, and Mati Aharoni
pages 300
publisher No Starch Press, Inc.
rating 10/10
reviewer eldavojohn
ISBN 978-1593272883
summary A thorough guide to penetration testing with the Metasploit Framework.

Source: Book Review: Metasploit The Penetration Tester’s Guide

In Rural UK, Old 2G Phones Beat 3G Smarphones For Connectivity

August 13th, 2011 08:26 admin View Comments

Cellphones

hypnosec writes “A new research has showed that Smartphones are worse in connectivity than 2G enabled mobile phones in remote areas in the United Kingdom. The research conducted by telecom watchdog OfCom has revealed that users should invest in mobile phones different than latest Smartphones, if they prioritize best reception for calls. ‘As would be expected, all the 2G operators have widespread coverage of the roads that were surveyed with relatively few not-spots. 3G coverage is much lower on the roads driven, likely reflecting the stage of network roll out in Devon at the time of the study,’ the OfCom has reported.”

Source: In Rural UK, Old 2G Phones Beat 3G Smarphones For Connectivity

Online Poker Chip Thief Gets Two Years In Jail

March 22nd, 2011 03:39 admin View Comments

Crime

jhernik writes “A 29-year-old gambler from Paignton, Devon, has been sentenced to two years in jail after hacking into an online gambling site and stealing billions of poker chips. Ashley Mitchell admitted to hacking into the servers of American gaming company Zynga Corporation in 2009 and making off with $12 million (£7.5 million) worth of gambling chips.”

Source: Online Poker Chip Thief Gets Two Years In Jail

“Science Is Cool And Fun”: 8-Year-Old Kids Get Their Bee Study Published

December 22nd, 2010 12:31 admin View Comments

Do bees prefer certain colors or shapes in the flowers from which they forage? And can they learn on the fly to go to certain colors or shapes that prove to be more lucrative?

That was the question for the students of Blackawton Primary School in Devon, England. And by devising a clever experiment to find out, these kids became the youngest authors ever to have a study published in a journal of Britain’s Royal Society.

From Ed Yong:

Their paper, based on fieldwork carried out in a local churchyard, describes how bumblebees can learn which flowers to forage from with more flexibility than anyone had thought. It’s the culmination of a project called ‘i, scientist’, designed to get students to actually carry out scientific research themselves. The kids received some support from Beau Lotto, a neuroscientist at UCL, and David Strudwick, Blackawton’s head teacher. But the work is all their own.

The class (including Lotto’s son, Misha) came up with their own questions, devised hypotheses, designed experiments, and analysed data.  They wrote the paper themselves (except for the abstract), and they drew all the figures with colouring pencils.

For all the details about this class experiment turned published study, check out the rest of Ed’s post at Not Exactly Rocket Science.

Image: Wikimedia Commons

Source: “Science Is Cool And Fun”: 8-Year-Old Kids Get Their Bee Study Published

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