Archive

Posts Tagged ‘developer’

Linus Chews Up Kernel Maintainer For Introducing Userspace Bug

December 28th, 2012 12:57 admin View Comments

Bug

An anonymous reader points out just how thick a skin it takes to be a kernel developer sometimes, linking to a chain of emails on the Linux Kernel Mailing List in which Linus lets loose on a kernel developer for introducing a change that breaks userspace apps (in this case, PulseAudio). “Shut up, Mauro. And I don’t _ever_ want to hear that kind of obvious garbage and idiocy from a kernel maintainer again. Seriously. I’d wait for Rafael’s patch to go through you, but I have another error report in my mailbox of all KDE media applications being broken by v3.8-rc1, and I bet it’s the same kernel bug. And you’ve shown yourself to not be competent in this issue, so I’ll apply it directly and immediately myself. WE DO NOT BREAK USERSPACE! Seriously. How hard is this rule to understand? We particularly don’t break user space with TOTAL CRAP. I’m angry, because your whole email was so _horribly_ wrong, and the patch that broke things was so obviously crap. … The fact that you then try to make *excuses* for breaking user space, and blaming some external program that *used* to work, is just shameful. It’s not how we work,” writes Linus, and that’s just the part we can print. Maybe it’s a good thing, but there’s certainly no handholding when it comes to changes to the heart of Linux.

Source: Linus Chews Up Kernel Maintainer For Introducing Userspace Bug

Google Docs Vs. Microsoft Word: an Even Matchup?

December 26th, 2012 12:59 admin View Comments

Google

Nerval’s Lobster writes “Software developer Jeff Cogswell writes: ‘About a year ago, I decided to migrate my documents to Google Docs and start using it for all my professional writing. I quickly hit some problems; frankly, Google Docs wasn’t as good an option as I’d initially hoped. Now I use LibreOffice on my desktop, and it works well, but I had to go through long odysseys with Google Docs and Zoho Docs to reach this point. Is Microsoft Word actually better than Google Docs and Zoho Docs? For my work, the answer is “yes,” but this doesn’t make me particularly happy. In the following essay, I present my problems with Google Docs and Zoho Docs (as well as some possible solutions) from my perspective as both a professional writer and a software developer.’”

Source: Google Docs Vs. Microsoft Word: an Even Matchup?

Ask Slashdot: 2nd Spoken/Written Language For Software Developer?

December 19th, 2012 12:49 admin View Comments

Education

ichimunki writes “I am a mid-career software developer. I am from the Midwestern U.S. and my native language is English. I’ve studied a few languages over the years, both human and computer. Lately I’ve begun to wonder what is the best second (human) language for someone in this field to have. Or is there even any practical value in working to become fluent in a non-English language? I am not planning to travel or move/work abroad. But if I knew a second language, would I be able to participate in a larger programming community worldwide? Would I be able to work with those folks in some useful capacity? Perhaps building products for foreign markets?”

Source: Ask Slashdot: 2nd Spoken/Written Language For Software Developer?

Raspberry Pi Team Launches Pi Store

December 17th, 2012 12:23 admin View Comments

Debian

sfcrazy writes “Raspberry Pi developer team has introduced the Pi store, a place to get software for Raspberry Pi, in collaboration with IndieCity and Velocix. The team hopes that the store will become a one-stop-shop for Raspbian Pi users. The store already has 23 major applications available for users including LibreOffice and Asterisk. There are classic games like Freeciv and OpenTTD and Raspberry Pi exclusive Iridium Rising. The team also managed to get ‘one piece of commercial content: the excellent Storm in a Teacup from Cobra Mobile.’”

Source: Raspberry Pi Team Launches Pi Store

Qt Developer Days 2012 Videos Released

December 12th, 2012 12:40 admin View Comments

Programming

Via Planet KDE comes news that the videos from the 2012 Qt Developer Conference are available on youtube. This joins the slides released in late November. It looks like there’s some pretty interesting stuff in there.

Source: Qt Developer Days 2012 Videos Released

Ask Slashdot: Where Do You Draw the Line On GPL V2 Derived Works and Fees?

December 9th, 2012 12:20 admin View Comments

Android

First time accepted submitter Shifuimam writes “I downloaded a DOSBox port for Android recently to get back into all the games of my childhood. Turns out that the only free distribution available hasn’t been updated in nearly two years, so I looked for alternatives. There are two on Google Play — DOSBox Turbo and “DOSBot”. Both charge a fee — DOSBox Turbo is $3.99; DOSBot is $0.99. The developer of DOSBot says on his Google Play entry that he will not release the source code of his application because it’s not GPL, even though it’s derived from source released under GPL v2 — this is definitely a violation of the license. The developer of DOSBox Turbo is refusing to release the source for his application unless you pay the $3.99 to “buy” a license of it. The same developer explicitly states that the “small” fee (although one might argue that $3.99 is pretty expensive for an OSS Android app) is to cover the cost of development. Unless I’m misreading the text of GPL v2, a fee can only be charged to cover the cost of the distribution of a program or derived work, not the cost of development. And, of course, it doesn’t cost the developer anything for someone to log in to Google Play and download their app. In fact, from what I can tell, there’s a one-time $25 fee to register for Google Checkout, after which releasing apps is free. Where do you draw the line on this? What do you do in this kind of situation?”

Source: Ask Slashdot: Where Do You Draw the Line On GPL V2 Derived Works and Fees?

Ask Slashdot: Developer Or Software Engineer? Can It Influence Your Work?

November 10th, 2012 11:50 admin View Comments

Programming

ctrahey writes “Many of us disregard the impact of our titles on various aspects of our lives, both professional and otherwise. Perhaps it’s appropriate to ask two questions about the difference between a couple titles familiar to the Slashdot community: Developer vs Software Engineer. What are the factors to consider in the appropriate use of the titles? And (more interesting to me), what influence might the use of these titles have on the written code? Have you observed a difference in attitudes, priorities, or outlooks in talent as a corollary to their titles?”

Source: Ask Slashdot: Developer Or Software Engineer? Can It Influence Your Work?

Nokia “Suspends” Its Free Developer Program

November 5th, 2012 11:50 admin View Comments

Technology

jbernardo writes “Nokia has put in deep freeze its free developer program, the launchpad. Now, in the Developer Programs page, one can only see a pitch for a paid ‘Nokia Premium Developer Program,’ and below, in the Nokia Developer Pro and Developer Launchpad box, there is a text merely stating that Nokia are not currently accepting new applications for Nokia Developer Launchpad and Nokia Developer Pro programs. With most (if not all) Launchpad memberships already expired, seems like Nokia no longer is interested in the developer community, which once was one of the mainstays of its domination of the smartphone market. Of course, that domination was destroyed by Elop and its ‘burning platforms‘ memo, together with the failed bet on Windows Phone 7, so maybe giving up on developers would also be expectable.”

Source: Nokia “Suspends” Its Free Developer Program

Developer Gets OpenSUSE Running On $249 Google Chromebook

October 25th, 2012 10:41 admin View Comments

Google

sfcrazy writes “Andrew Wafaa an ARM developer who is responsible for porting openSUSE to ARM just got his hands on the Chromebook and he managed to run openSUSE on it.” Hopefully that means other distros can be soon ported to the Chromebook as well.

Source: Developer Gets OpenSUSE Running On $249 Google Chromebook

Stallman On Unity Dash: Canonical Will Have To Give Users’ Data To Governments

October 13th, 2012 10:40 admin View Comments

Privacy

Giorgio Maone writes “Ubuntu developer and fellow Mozillian Benjamin Kerensa chatted with various people about the new Amazon Product Results in the Ubuntu 12.10 Unity Dash. Among them, Richard Stallman told him that this feature is bad because: 1. ‘If Canonical gets this data, it will be forced to hand it over to various governments.’; 2. Amazon is bad. Concerned people can disable remote data retrieval for any lens and scopes or, more surgically, use sudo apt-get remove unity-lens-shopping.”

Source: Stallman On Unity Dash: Canonical Will Have To Give Users’ Data To Governments

YOYOYOOYOYOYO