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Posts Tagged ‘Database’

New York Paper Uses Public Records To Publish Gun-Owner Map

December 25th, 2012 12:17 admin View Comments

Privacy

New submitter Isaac-1 writes “First it was the sex offenders being mapped using public records, not it seems to be gun owners — I wonder who will be next? It seems a newspaper in New York has published an interactive map with the names and addresses of people with [handguns].” It’s happened before: In 2007, Virginia’s Roanoke Times raised the ire of many gun owners by publishing a database of Virginia’s gun permit holders that it assembled based on public records inquiries. (The paper later withdrew that database.) Similarly, WRAL-TV in North Carolina published a database earlier this year with searchable map of (partially redacted) information about permit holders in that state, and Philadelphia made the news for a similar disclosure — complete with interactive map and addresses — of hundreds of gun permit applicants and holders.

Source: New York Paper Uses Public Records To Publish Gun-Owner Map

Some UK Councils Barred From Using Gov’t Vehicle Database

December 8th, 2012 12:03 admin View Comments

Government

Bruce66423 writes “A number of British councils are being banned from accessing the national Vehicle Database system. While sometimes this appears to be due to technical infractions, the banning of some ‘permanently’ seems to be as a result of more serious misdemeanours. Trust the government? Not a good idea…”

Source: Some UK Councils Barred From Using Gov’t Vehicle Database

Ask Slashdot: Which OSS Database Project To Help?

November 28th, 2012 11:51 admin View Comments

Databases

DoofusOfDeath writes “I’ve done a good bit of SQL development / tuning in the past. After being away from the database world for a while to finish grad school, I’m about ready to get back in the game. I want to start contributing to some OSS database project, both for fun and perhaps to help my employment prospects in western Europe. My problem is choosing which OSS DB to help with. MySQL is the most popular, so getting involved with it would be most helpful to my employment prospects. But its list of fundamental design flaws (video) seems so severe that I can’t respect it as a database. I’m attracted to the robust correctness requirements of PostgreSQL, but there don’t seem to be many prospective employers using it. So while I’d enjoy working on it, I don’t think it would be very helpful to my employment prospects. Any suggestions?”

Source: Ask Slashdot: Which OSS Database Project To Help?

Ask Slashdot: How To Both Mirror and Protect Crowdsourced Data?

October 21st, 2012 10:45 admin View Comments

Transportation

New submitter cellurl writes “I run wikispeedia, a database of speed limit signs. People approach us to mirror our data, but I am quite certain it will become a one-way street. So my question is: How can I give consumers peace of mind in using our data and not give up the ship? We want to be the clearing house for this information, at the same time following our charter of providing safety. Some thoughts that come to mind are creating a ‘Service Level Agreement’ which they will no doubt reject, or MySQL-clustering, or rsync. Any thoughts, (technically, logistically, legally) appreciated.”

Source: Ask Slashdot: How To Both Mirror and Protect Crowdsourced Data?

The UAE Claims To Hold the Worlds Largest Biometric Database

October 15th, 2012 10:50 admin View Comments

Privacy

another random user writes “The United Arab Emirates holds the largest biometric database in the world, the Emirates Identity Authority has announced. The population register of Emirates ID has over 103 million digital fingerprints and over 15 million digital facial recognition records, which includes multiple records of each UAE resident, and digital signatures as of October 11, senior officials said. Dr. Ali Al Khoury, Director General of Emirates ID, said the authority has submitted an official application to the World Record Academy to recognize this record. Asked about the confirmation of the authority’s claims about the world record, an official spokesman of the authority told Gulf News on Sunday: ‘We have made worldwide surveys and inquiries with the similar official authorities and agencies of the world governments holding such databases and confirmed that our database is the largest. The World Record Academy also confirmed to us that no other government or authority has made a similar claim for such a record,’ he said.”

Source: The UAE Claims To Hold the Worlds Largest Biometric Database

Oracle Open World: Ellison Preaches Cloud Religion

October 1st, 2012 10:03 admin View Comments

Cloud

Nerval’s Lobster writes “Oracle CEO Larry Ellison used his opening keynote at Oracle Open World (OOW) to unveil several initiatives to accelerate the cloud, including its own private cloud, Infrastructure-as-a-Service, and its latest database version—which, coincidentally, can be stored in memory within Oracle’s latest Exadata database machines. Ellison also paid tribute to Oracle hardware partner Fujitsu, which had earlier announced ‘Project Athena’: a server designed with a UltraSPARC chip that (he claimed) can run the Oracle database ‘faster than any microprocessor on the planet.’ Ellison opened OpenWorld with four key announcements: that Oracle is now offering infrastructure as a service; that it will complement the IaaS offering by allowing customers to run that same infrastructure behind their corporate firewall as a private cloud; the launch of Oracle database 12C (where the ‘c’ stands for ‘cloud’); and, finally, the new Exadata servers, which barely use disk drives at all in-favor of in-memory storage, with flash memory as a fallback.”

Source: Oracle Open World: Ellison Preaches Cloud Religion

Google Spanner: First Globally Scalable Database With External Consistency

September 18th, 2012 09:04 admin View Comments

Databases

vu1986 writes with this bit from GigaOm: “Google has made public the details of its Spanner database technology, which allows a database to store data across multiple data centers, millions of machines and trillions of rows. But it’s not just larger than the average database, Spanner also allows applications that use the database to dictate where specific data is stored so as to reduce latency when retrieving it. Making this whole concept work is what Google calls its True Time API, which combines an atomic clock and a GPS clock to timestamp data so it can then be synched across as many data centers and machines as needed.” Original paper. The article focuses a lot of the Time API, but external consistency on a global scale seems to be the big deal here. From the paper: “Even though many projects happily use Bigtable, we have also consistently received complaints from users that Bigtable can be difficult to use for some kinds of applications: those that have complex, evolving schemas, or those that want strong consistency in the presence of wide-area replication. … Many applications at Google have chosen to use Megastore (PDF) because of its semi-relational data model and support for synchronous replication, despite its relatively poor write throughput. As a consequence, Spanner has evolved from a Bigtable-like versioned key-value store into a temporal multi-version database. Data is stored in schematized semi-relational tables; data is versioned, and each version is automatically timestamped with its commit time; old versions of data are subject to configurable garbage-collection policies; and applications can read data at old timestamps. Spanner supports general-purpose transactions, and provides a SQL-based query language.”

Source: Google Spanner: First Globally Scalable Database With External Consistency

FBI Launches $1 Billion Nationwide Face Recognition System

September 7th, 2012 09:56 admin View Comments

Privacy

MrSeb writes “The U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation has begun rolling out its new $1 billion biometric Next Generation Identification (NGI) system. In essence, NGI is a nationwide database of mugshots, iris scans, DNA records, voice samples, and other biometrics that will help the FBI identify and catch criminals — but it is how this biometric data is captured, through a nationwide network of cameras and photo databases, that is raising the eyebrows of privacy advocates. Until now, the FBI relied on IAFIS, a national fingerprint database that has long been due an overhaul. Over the last few months, the FBI has been pilot testing a face recognition system, which will soon be scaled up (PDF) until it’s nationwide. In theory, this should result in much faster positive identifications of criminals and fewer unsolved cases. The problem is, the FBI hasn’t guaranteed that the NGI will only use photos of known criminals. There may come a time when the NGI is filled with as many photos as possible, from as many sources as possible, of as many people as possible — criminal or otherwise. Imagine if the NGI had full access to every driving license and passport photo in the country — and DNA records kept by doctors, and iris scans kept by businesses. The FBI’s NGI, if the right checks and balances aren’t in place, could very easily become a tool that decimates civilian privacy and freedom.”

Source: FBI Launches $1 Billion Nationwide Face Recognition System

Don’t Build a Database of Ruin

August 28th, 2012 08:08 admin View Comments

Privacy

Hugh Pickens writes “Paul Ohm writes in Harvard Business Review that businesses today are building perfect digital dossiers of their customers, massive data stores containing thousands of facts about every member of our society. He says these databases will grow to connect every individual to at least one closely guarded secret. ‘This might be a secret about a medical condition, family history, or personal preference. It is a secret that, if revealed, would cause more than embarrassment or shame; it would lead to serious, concrete, devastating harm,’ writes Ohm. ‘And these companies are combining their data stores, which will give rise to a single, massive database. I call this the Database of Ruin. Once we have created this database, it is unlikely we will ever be able to tear it apart.’ Consider the most famous recent example of big data’s utility in invading personal privacy: Target’s analytics team can determine which shoppers are pregnant, and even predict their delivery dates, by detecting subtle shifts in purchasing habits. ‘In the absence of intervention, soon companies will know things about us that we do not even know about ourselves. This is the exciting possibility of Big Data, but for privacy, it is a recipe for disaster.’ According to Ohm, if we stick to our current path, the Database of Ruin will become an inevitable fixture of our future landscape, one that will be littered with lives ruined by the exploitation of data assembled for profit. The only way we avoid this is if companies learn to say, ‘no’ to some of the privacy-invading innovations they’re pursuing. ‘The lesson is plain: compete vigorously and beat your competitors in every legitimate way, except when it comes to privacy invasion. Too many companies have learned this lesson the hard way, launching invasive new services that have triggered class action lawsuits, Congressional inquiries, and media firestorms.’”

Source: Don’t Build a Database of Ruin

EFF: Americans May Not Know It, But Many Are In a Face Recognition Database Now

July 19th, 2012 07:08 admin View Comments

Facebook

colinneagle writes “People are not going to, nor should they have to, start walking around outside with a bag over their head to avoid security cameras capturing images of them. Yet ‘face recognition allows for covert, remote and mass capture and identification of images — and the photos that may end up in a database include not just a person’s face but also how she is dressed and possibly whom she is with. This creates threats to free association and free expression not evident in other biometrics,’ testified EFF Staff Attorney Jennifer Lynch. There are 32 states that use some form of facial recognition for DMV photos. Every day, Facebook happily slurps up and automatically scans with facial recognition software about 300 million photos that users upload to the social networking giant. ‘Face recognition is here to stay, and, though many Americans may not realize it, they are already in a face recognition database,’ Lynch said. In fact, when you stop to consider Facebook “at least 54% of the United States population already has a face print.” Now it purchased Face.com which had 31 billion face images profiled.”

Source: EFF: Americans May Not Know It, But Many Are In a Face Recognition Database Now

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