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Posts Tagged ‘clang’

FreeBSD Throws the Clang/LLVM Switch: Future Releases Use LLVM

November 7th, 2012 11:33 admin View Comments

BSD

An anonymous reader writes “Brooks Davis has announced that the FreeBSD Project has now officially switched to Clang/LLVM as C/C++ compiler. This follows several years of preparation, feeding back improvements to the Clang and LLVM source code bases, and nightly builds of FreeBSD using LLVM over two years. Future snapshots and all major FreeBSD releases will ship compiled with LLVM by default!”

Source: FreeBSD Throws the Clang/LLVM Switch: Future Releases Use LLVM

OpenBSD Fork Bitrig Announced

June 13th, 2012 06:30 admin View Comments

Open Source

With the goal of bringing more experimental development to the OpenBSD code base, a few developers have announced a fork named Bitrig. According to their FAQ, Bitrig aims to build a small system targeting only modern hardware and “be a very commercially friendly code base by using non-viral licenses where possible.” Their first step toward that goal was removing GCC in favor of LLVM/Clang. The project roadmap shows their future goals as adding FUSE support, improving multiprocessing, porting the system to ARM, and replacing the GNU C++ library with LLVM’s.

Source: OpenBSD Fork Bitrig Announced

FreeBSD 10 To Use Clang Compiler, Deprecate GCC

May 13th, 2012 05:12 admin View Comments

GNU is Not Unix

An anonymous reader writes “Shared in last quarter’s FreeBSD status report are developer plans to have LLVM/Clang become the default compiler and to deprecate GCC. Clang can now build most packages and suit well for their BSD needs. They also plan to have a full BSD-licensed C++11 stack in FreeBSD 10.” Says the article, too: “Some vendors have also been playing around with the idea of using Clang to build the Linux kernel (it’s possible to do with certain kernel configurations, patches, and other headaches).”

Source: FreeBSD 10 To Use Clang Compiler, Deprecate GCC

MINIX 3.2 Released With Some Major Changes

February 29th, 2012 02:06 admin View Comments

Operating Systems

An anonymous reader writes MINIX 3.2.0 was released today (alternative announcement). Lots of code has been pulled in from NetBSD, replacing libc, much of the userspace and the bootloader. This should allow much more software to be ported easily (using the pkgsrc infrastructure which was previously adopted) while retaining the microkernel architecture. Also Clang is now used as a default compiler and ELF as the default binary format, which should allow MINIX to be ported to other architectures in the near future (in fact, they are currently looking to hire someone with embedded systems experience to port MINIX to ARM). live CD is available.” The big highlight is the new NetBSD based userland — it replaces the incredibly old fashioned and limited Minix userland. There’s even experimental SMP support. Topping it all off, the project switched over to git which would make getting involved in development a bit easier for the casual hacker.

Source: MINIX 3.2 Released With Some Major Changes

New LLVM Debugger Subproject Already Faster Than GDB

June 10th, 2010 06:38 admin View Comments

kthreadd writes “The LLVM project is now working on a debugger called LLDB that’s already faster than GDB and could be a possible alternative in the future for C, C++, and Objective-C developers. With the ongoing success of Clang and other LLVM subprojects, are the days of GNU as the mainstream free and open development toolchain passé?” LLVM stands for Low Level Virtual Machine; Wikipedia as usual has a good explanation of the parent project.

Source: New LLVM Debugger Subproject Already Faster Than GDB

Ford’s New Cars To Be Wi-Fi Hotspots

December 21st, 2009 12:28 admin View Comments

clang_jangle writes “Autoblog and others are reporting on Ford’s planned extension to its in-vehicle SYNC multimedia systems — to enable SYNC-equipped Fords as rolling Wi-Fi hotspots. Customers would use their existing cellular USB modems, so for already equipped road warriers there would be no extra monthly charges. While there are other ways to get your car online (Autonet Mobile review here), the SYNC system does look especially simple and practical. Last year BMW made some noise about FOSS for their cars, but they seem to have since stopped talking about it. Will we see a FOSS option for automotive infotainment systems in the future?” The capabilities of SYNC even without W-Fi look potentially pretty distracting. Unless Wi-Fi is blacked out for the driver, the safety implications of this development are worrisome.

Source: Ford’s New Cars To Be Wi-Fi Hotspots

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