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Posts Tagged ‘Circuit’

Complex Logic Circuit Made From Bacterial Genes

October 14th, 2012 10:28 admin View Comments

Science

another random user writes “Just as electronic circuits are made from resistors, capacitors and transistors, biological circuits can be made from genes and regulatory proteins. Engineer Tae Seok Moon’s dream is to design modular ‘genetic parts’ that can be used to build logic controllers inside microbes that will program them to make fuel, clean up pollutants, or kill infectious bacteria or cancerous cells. The circuit Moon eventually built consisted of four sensors for four different molecules that fed into three two-input AND gates. If all four molecules were present, all three AND gates turned on and the last one produced a reporter protein that fluoresced red, so that the operation of the circuit could be easily monitored.”

Source: Complex Logic Circuit Made From Bacterial Genes

8th Circuit Upholds $220,000 Verdict In Jammie Thomas Case

September 11th, 2012 09:50 admin View Comments

Music

NewYorkCountryLawyer writes “The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit has upheld the initial jury verdict in the case against Jammie Thomas, Capitol Records v. Jammie Thomas-Rasset. This case was the first jury trial for a file-sharing suit brought by the major record labels, and focused on copyright infringement for 24 songs. The Court of Appeals has ruled that the award of $220,000, or $9250 per song, was not an unconstitutional violation of Due Process. The Court, in its 18-page decision (PDF), declined to reach the ‘making available’ issue, for procedural reasons.”

Source: 8th Circuit Upholds $220,000 Verdict In Jammie Thomas Case

A (Mostly) 3-D Printed Race Car Hits 140 Km/h

August 26th, 2012 08:32 admin View Comments

Transportation

An anonymous reader writes with an excerpt from a story describing the efforts of a 16-person team called “Group T” competing in the Formula Student 2012 challenge. They’ve created a car called the “Areion,” described as the world’s first 3D printed race car. “The Areion is not wholly 3D printed but most of it actually is. It was tested on Hockenheim race circuit and went from zero to 100km/h in just four seconds. Maximum speed Areion achieved on the same circuit was 141km/h.” The car features an electric drive train and bio-composite materials, and was created using a printing system called Materialise.

Source: A (Mostly) 3-D Printed Race Car Hits 140 Km/h

SCOTUS Refuses To Hear Tenenbaum Appeal

May 21st, 2012 05:38 admin View Comments

Music

quantr writes “The Supreme Court has declined to hear Joel Tenenbaum’s appeal. A jury in 2009 ordered Tenenbaum, of Providence, R.I., to pay $675,000 for illegally downloading and sharing 30 songs. A federal judge called the penalty constitutionally excessive, but the 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals reinstated it at the request of the Recording Industry Association of America. Tenenbaum’s attorney, Harvard law professor Charles Nesson, said he’s disappointed the high court won’t hear the case. But he said the 1st Circuit instructed a judge to consider reducing the award without deciding any constitutional challenge. Nesson said ‘Tenenbaum is just entering the job market and can’t pay the penalty.’”

Source: SCOTUS Refuses To Hear Tenenbaum Appeal

3D-Printed Circuit Boards, For Solder-Free Printable Electronics

May 6th, 2012 05:10 admin View Comments

Hardware

An anonymous reader writes “Check out the latest success of the OpenSCAD 3d-printed electronics library. To use it, you just need a 3D printer and some conductive thread. OpenSCAD generates a component holder, and conductive thread wraps it all together — no solder, no etching chemicals, no sending out for anything. The instructable takes you through all the steps from schematic to circuit, and includes a more useful example: the fully printed LED flashlight.”

Source: 3D-Printed Circuit Boards, For Solder-Free Printable Electronics

3D-Printed Circuit Boards, For Solder-Free Printable Electronics

May 6th, 2012 05:10 admin View Comments

Hardware

An anonymous reader writes “Check out the latest success of the OpenSCAD 3d-printed electronics library. To use it, you just need a 3D printer and some conductive thread. OpenSCAD generates a component holder, and conductive thread wraps it all together — no solder, no etching chemicals, no sending out for anything. The instructable takes you through all the steps from schematic to circuit, and includes a more useful example: the fully printed LED flashlight.”

Source: 3D-Printed Circuit Boards, For Solder-Free Printable Electronics

Schematics and Circuit Simulation In the Browser

February 28th, 2012 02:50 admin View Comments

Education

compumike writes CircuitLab today released a browser-based schematic editor and circuit simulator for the online electronics community. SPICE-like device models and mixed-mode simulation support allows engineers and hobbyists to tackle a wide range of board-level design problems. While most EDA software is Windows-only, CircuitLab is 100% web-based, Windows/Mac/Linux cross-platform, and requires no installation or plug-ins. Instead of today’s typical forum posts with static screenshots from different desktop tools, the online electronics community can now use CircuitLab to share useful URLs (as well as PNGs and PDFs) which link directly to interactive, editable, runnable schematics. In just a few clicks, another designer can open that circuit, make a change, simulate it, and post the new version back to the community.”

Source: Schematics and Circuit Simulation In the Browser

Rethinking the Social Media-Centric Classroom

February 12th, 2012 02:28 admin View Comments

Education

An anonymous reader writes “Michael Wesch has been on the lecture circuit for years touting new models of active teaching with technology. The associate professor of cultural anthropology at Kansas State University has given TED talks. Wired magazine gave him a Rave Award. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching once named him a national professor of the year. But now Mr. Wesch finds himself rethinking the fundamentals of teaching after hearing that other professors can’t get his experiments with Twitter and YouTube to work in their classes. Is the lecture best after all?”

Source: Rethinking the Social Media-Centric Classroom

Warrantless Wiretapping Decisions Issued By Ninth Circuit Court

December 30th, 2011 12:58 admin View Comments

Electronic Frontier Foundation

sunbird writes “The Ninth Circuit yesterday issued two decisions in the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s lawsuits against the National Security Agency (Jewel v. NSA) and the telecommunications companies (Hepting v. AT&T). EFF had argued in Hepting that the retroactive immunity passed by Congress was unconstitutional. The Ninth Circuit decision (PDF) upholds the immunity and the district court’s dismissal of the case. Short of an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court, this effectively ends the suit against the telecoms. In much better news, the same panel issued a decision (PDF) reversing the dismissal of the lawsuit against the N.S.A. and remanded the case back to the lower court for more proceedings. These cases have been previously discussed here.”

Source: Warrantless Wiretapping Decisions Issued By Ninth Circuit Court

Liquid Metal Capsules Used To Make Self-Healing Electronics

December 21st, 2011 12:25 admin View Comments

Hardware

MrSeb writes “A crack team of engineers at the University of Illinois has developed an electronic circuit that autonomously self-heals when its metal wires are broken. This self-healing system restores conductivity within ‘mere microseconds,’ which is apparently fast enough that operation can continue without interruption. The self-healing mechanism is delightfully simple: The engineers place a bunch of 10-micron (0.01mm) microcapsules along the length of a circuit. The microcapsules are full of liquid metal, a gallium-indium alloy, and if the circuit underneath cracks, so do the microcapsules (90% of the time, anyway — the tech isn’t perfect yet!). The liquid metal oozes into the circuit board, restoring up to 99% conductivity, and everything continues as normal. This even works with multi-layer printed circuit boards (PCBs), such the motherboard in your computer, too. There’s no word on whether this same technology could one day be used by Terminators to self-heal shotgun blasts to the face, but it certainly sounds quite similar. The immediate use-cases are in extreme environments (aerospace), and batteries (which can’t be taken apart to fix), but long term we might one day buy motherboards with these self-healing microcapsules built in.”

Source: Liquid Metal Capsules Used To Make Self-Healing Electronics

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