Archive

Posts Tagged ‘business’

Google, FTC Settle Antitrust Case

January 3rd, 2013 01:00 admin View Comments

Google

itwbennett writes “According to an ITworld report, ‘Google has agreed to change some of its business practices, including allowing competitors access to some standardized technologies, to resolve a U.S. Federal Trade Commission antitrust complaint against the company.’ This includes ‘allow[ing] competitors access to standards-essential patents the company acquired along with its purchase of Motorola Mobility.’ Also among the business practices Google has agreed to stop is ‘scraping Web content from rivals and allegedly passing it off as its own, said FTC Chairman Jon Leibowitz.’” SlashCloud has some more details, including links to the agreement itself and Google’s soft-pedaling description of “voluntary product changes.”

Source: Google, FTC Settle Antitrust Case

A Subscription-Based Movie Theater

January 1st, 2013 01:01 admin View Comments

Movies

When the local movie theater in Oakhurst, California went out of business, residents were stuck without a way to watch films on the big screen without driving for at least an hour beforehand. Now, three men are trying to resurrect the theater with one major change: instead of relying solely on ticket sales, their business model revolves around subscriptions. From the article: ‘They ran models of Nelson’s subscription-based theater idea, showing that to break even they would need 3,000 people, or 15% of the mountain communities, to sign up. For $19.95 per month, a member would be able to see each movie one time and buy individual tickets for friends. Non-members could buy a $16 day pass. While researching the theater business, Nelson learned that studios are transitioning to digital distribution. Thousands of independent theaters that couldn’t afford equipment upgrades have closed over the last 10 years, according to industry experts. Hundreds of others — which, like the Met, still show print films — remain on the brink. The subscription business model could pay for the new equipment.’

Source: A Subscription-Based Movie Theater

A Peek Into the Business Side of Online Publishing (Video)

December 28th, 2012 12:35 admin View Comments

Media

Mark Westlake is the Chief Revenue Office for TechMediaNetwork. Slashdot has often taken a mediawatch role, especially when it comes to technology coverage — which is what TechMediaNetork does for a living. As Chief Revenue Office, Mark is in charge of making sure enough money comes in to pay writers and editors, pay for bandwidth and servers, and hopefully have enough revenue over and above expenses to show a profit. We’ve interviewed editors and writers, and plenty of writers’ work gets linked from Slashdot, but we pay little or no (mostly no) attention to the business side of the publishing business. Like it or not, if we are going to have online news someone has to sell the ads and make decisions about whether to set up a paywall or not. That’s Mark’s job. Like him or not, he does a job somebody has to do, and has been doing it for 30 years. He knows he’s talking to a potentially hostile audience here, but he accepts that. As he says, near the end of the video, “…you can’t please everybody, right?”

Source: A Peek Into the Business Side of Online Publishing (Video)

Google Challenging Microsoft For Business Software

December 26th, 2012 12:38 admin View Comments

Businesses

SternisheFan tips a report at the NY Times about the progress Google is making in its quest to unseat Microsoft’s position atop the business software industry. From the article: It has taken years, but Google seems to be cutting into Microsoft’s stronghold — businesses. … In the last year Google has scored an impressive string of wins, including at the Swiss drug maker Hoffmann-La Roche, where over 80,000 employees use the package, and at the Interior Department, where 90,000 use it. One big reason is price. Google charges $50 a year for each person using its product, a price that has not changed since it made its commercial debut, even though Google has added features. In 2012, for example, Google added the ability to work on a computer not connected to the Internet, as well as security and data management that comply with more stringent European standards. That made it much easier to sell the product to multinationals and companies in Europe. … Microsoft says it does not yet see a threat. Google ‘has not yet shown they are truly serious,’ said Julia White, a general manager in Microsoft’s business division. ‘From the outside, they are an advertising company.’”

Source: Google Challenging Microsoft For Business Software

Rivalry Building Between Amazon and Google

December 25th, 2012 12:35 admin View Comments

Google

Amazon and Google, both giants in the online business world, started out as separate entities with two very different agendas. As each has grown into an empire, the overlapping areas of business between the two companies has grown as well. But with both companies moving strongly into the electronic device market, cloud services, and Amazon now building out its advertising network, they find themselves increasingly at odds, and 2013 may bring more direct battles.”Amazon wants to be the one place where you buy everything. Google wants to be the one place where you find everything, of which buying things is a subset. So when you marry those facts I think you’re going to see a natural collision,” said VC partner Chi-hua Chien. Adds Reuters, “Not long after Bezos learned of Google’s catalog plans, Amazon began scanning books and providing searchable digital excerpts. Its Kindle e-reader, launched a few years later, owes much of its inspiration to the catalog news, the executive said. Now, Amazon is pushing its online ad efforts, threatening to siphon revenue and users from Google’s main search website.”

Source: Rivalry Building Between Amazon and Google

Ask Slashdot: Facebook, Twitter For Business, Is It Worth the Privacy Trade-Off?

December 13th, 2012 12:28 admin View Comments

Businesses

cayenne8 writes “I’ve been a staunch advocate of NOT joining Facebook or Twitter or the other social networks to protect my privacy and to not voluntarily give all my personal information away to corporate America, or even the Government. However, I’m beginning to look into making money through various means on the side, one of them being photography/videography. With these mediums, being seen is critically important. Having a business facing site on Facebook/Google+ and even using Twitter can be great for self promotion, and can open up your business to a huge audience. If you were to open your FB and other social network accounts with business ONLY information, and keep your personal information (name, image, etc) off the Facebook account…will this keep your personal privacy still from them, or are their algorithms good enough to piece together who you are from the business only sites? Is the payoff worth the potential trade-off for generating potential customers for your business and guiding them to your primary website?”

Source: Ask Slashdot: Facebook, Twitter For Business, Is It Worth the Privacy Trade-Off?

Ask Slashdot: Do You Still Need a Phone At Your Desk?

December 6th, 2012 12:29 admin View Comments

Businesses

First time accepted submitter its a trappist! writes “When I started my career back in the early 1990s, everyone had a ‘business phone’ phone on their desk. The phone was how your co-workers, customers, friends and family got in touch with you during the business day. It had a few features that everyone used — basic calling, transfer, hold, mute, three-way calling (if you could figure it out). This was before personal mobile phones or corporate IM, so the phone was basically the one and only means of real-time communication in the office. Flash forward 20 years. Today I have a smart phone, corporate IM, several flavors of personal IM, the Skype client and several flavors of collaboration software including Google Apps/Docs, GoToMeeting. My wife and daughter call me or text me on the cell phone. My co-workers who are too lazy or passive aggressive to wander into my office use IM. My brother in Iraq uses Skype. I use GoToMeeting and its built-in VoIP with customers. The big black phone sits there gathering dust. I use it for conference calls a few times each month.I’m sure that there are sales people out there who would rather give up a body part than their trusty office phone, but do any of the rest of us need them? Around here, the younger engineers frequently unplug them and stick them in a cabinet to free up desk space. Are the days of the office phone (and the office phone system) at an end?”

Source: Ask Slashdot: Do You Still Need a Phone At Your Desk?

The Trouble With Bringing Your Business Laptop To China

December 4th, 2012 12:37 admin View Comments

China

snydeq writes “A growing trend faces business executives traveling to China: government or industry spooks stealing data from their laptops and installing spyware. ‘While you were out to dinner that first night, someone entered your room (often a nominal hotel staffer), carefully examined the contents of your laptop, and installed spyware on the computer — without your having a clue. The result? Exposure of information, including customer data, product development documentation, countless emails, and other proprietary information of value to competitors and foreign governments. Perhaps even, thanks to the spyware, there’s an ongoing infection in your corporate network that continually phones home key secrets for months or years afterward.’”

Source: The Trouble With Bringing Your Business Laptop To China

Mitsubishi Drops Bulky DLP TVs: End of an Era

December 1st, 2012 12:04 admin View Comments

Displays

An anonymous reader writes “Mitsubishi was the last hold-out in the big-screen rear-projection display business after Samsung left the category in 2009. Now Mitsubishi has dropped the dinosaur. Every big-brand CE manufacturer got their start in the big-TV business via rear projection sets from CRT to DLP to LCoS, eventually replacing them with modern-day flat screens. Mitsubishi did develop LCD flat-screens for a time, but dropped out of that market to focus on rear DLPs after Samsung gave it a monopoly. The author, a CE editor, takes a nostalgic and amusing look at her 15 years with three Mitsu rear pros, the only big-screen TV she’s known.”

Source: Mitsubishi Drops Bulky DLP TVs: End of an Era

Ad Blocking – a Coming Legal Battleground?

November 23rd, 2012 11:30 admin View Comments

Advertising

An anonymous reader writes “Computerworld asks: What will happen if big advertisers declare AdBlock Plus a clear and present danger to online business models? Hint: it will probably involve lawyers. From the article: ‘Could browser ad blocking one day become so prevalent that it jeopardises potentially billions of dollars of online ad revenue, and the primary business models of many online and new media businesses? If so, it will inevitably face legal attack.’”

Source: Ad Blocking – a Coming Legal Battleground?

YOYOYOOYOYOYO